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Appendiceal Abscess | Percutaneous Catheter Drainage (Transgluteal)
Appendiceal Abscess | Percutaneous Catheter Drainage (Transgluteal)
2016angledapproachavoidscathetercleancreatedeepdemonstratingflushimagingpelvicreliablesheathSIRsuturetechniquetransglutealtransrectaltransvaginalultrasounduterusutilize
How To Treat By EVAR Complex Aorto-Iliac AAAs In Patients With Renal Transplants, Horseshoe Or Pelvic Kidneys: Technical Tips
How To Treat By EVAR Complex Aorto-Iliac AAAs In Patients With Renal Transplants, Horseshoe Or Pelvic Kidneys: Technical Tips
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DEBATE: All SFA Lesions Can Be Treated Endovascularly: Should They Be: Open Bypass Should Rarely Be Used
DEBATE: All SFA Lesions Can Be Treated Endovascularly: Should They Be: Open Bypass Should Rarely Be Used
AbbottangiogramballooncanalizationdiameterendovascularevarfemoropoplitealhematomaintroducerlesionsocclusionpatencyperformPeripheral stent systempoplitealpunctureretrogradestentsubintimalSuperatechniquetherapeuticthrombosistotaltreatVeith
4D Ultrasound Evaluation Of AAAs: What Is It; How Can It Help To Predict Growth And Rupture Rates
4D Ultrasound Evaluation Of AAAs: What Is It; How Can It Help To Predict Growth And Rupture Rates
analysisaneurysmassessmentbasedbiomechanicalcontourdatadiagnosticdistalfieldgrowthimagesimaginglimitationslongitudinalmechanicalmergednephrotoxicparametersperformperformedpredictpredictorpropertiesproximalrupturesegmentationstressultrasoundvalidateviewwall
How To Obtain Percutaneous Axillary Access For F/B/EVAR: It Is Not Simple But It Can Be Safe: How To Prevent Bleeding And Nerve Injury
How To Obtain Percutaneous Axillary Access For F/B/EVAR: It Is Not Simple But It Can Be Safe: How To Prevent Bleeding And Nerve Injury
accessapproacharterialarteryaxillaryaxillary arteryAxillary Ecoguided punctureB-FEVARballooncollateralsdeploydiameterDouble proglide techniqueenhancefemoralfrenchpercutaneousproglidepuncturepuncturedrenalsegmentsheathstentvesselswire
Robotic Assisted Left Renal Vein Transposition For The Treatment Of Nutcracker Syndrome (Video)
Robotic Assisted Left Renal Vein Transposition For The Treatment Of Nutcracker Syndrome (Video)
abdominalcavaCavotomyclampclipclipscompressioncontralateraldissectionepigastricincisionsivusOpen Transposition of the Left Renal VeinovarianrenalRenal Nutcracker Syndromerenal veinretroperitoneumRobotic Assisted Open Transposition of the Renal Veinsuturetherapeutictranspositionveinvertebral
Contralateral Deep Vein Thrombosis After Iliac Vein Stenting: A Clear And
Contralateral Deep Vein Thrombosis After Iliac Vein Stenting: A Clear And
cavacontralateralCook MedicalCook-Zdeepexperienceexplantedextendediliaciliac veininferiorintroduceripsilateraljvirpatencypatientsstentstentingtherapeuticthrombosedthrombosisTracheobronchial StentveinvenawallstentWallstent (Boston Scientific) - Endoprosthesiswallstents
Current Management Of Bleeding Hemodialysis Fistulas: Can The Fistula Be Salvaged
Current Management Of Bleeding Hemodialysis Fistulas: Can The Fistula Be Salvaged
accessaneurysmalapproachArtegraftavoidbleedingbovineBovine Carotid Artery Graft (BCA)carotidcentersDialysisemergencyexperiencefatalFistulafistulasflapgraftgraftshemodialysishemorrhageinfectioninterpositionlesionLimberg skin flapnecrosispatencypatientpatientsptfeskinStent graftsubsequentsuturetourniquetulceratedulcerationsvascular
Value Of Intraprocedural Completion Cone Beam CT After Standard EVARs And Complex EVARs (F/B/EVARs): What To Do If One Does Not Have The Technology
Value Of Intraprocedural Completion Cone Beam CT After Standard EVARs And Complex EVARs (F/B/EVARs): What To Do If One Does Not Have The Technology
4-Vessel FEVARangiographyaortoiliacarchaxialbeamBEVARbifurcatedcalcificationcatheterizecatheterizedcompletionconecone beamcoronaldetectablediagnosticdilatordissectionDissection FlapendoleakevaluatesevarfemorofenestratedFEVARfindingsfusionGE HealthcareinterventionmesentericocclusionoperativelypositiveproceduresprospectiveproximalradiationRadiocontrast agentrotationalstentstudytechnicalthoracoabdominaltriggeredunnecessaryVisipaque
Cloud Based System For Image Fusion Techniques With Mobile C-Arms (The Cydar System): How Does It Work And Advantages For All Vascular Interventions
Cloud Based System For Image Fusion Techniques With Mobile C-Arms (The Cydar System): How Does It Work And Advantages For All Vascular Interventions
anatomyaorticaortoiliacAortoiliac occlusive diseasebasedBilateral Kissing StentsbodiesclinicalcontrastCydar EV (Cydar Medical) - Cloud SoftwaredecreasesderivedendovascularevarFEVARfluorofluoroscopyfusionhardwarehybridiliacimageimagesimagingmechanicaloverlaypatientpostureprocedureproximalqualityradiationreductionscanstandardstatisticallytechnologyTEVARTherapeutic / DiagnostictrackingvertebralZiehm ImagingZiehm RFD C-arm
With Adjuncts (Chimney Grafts And Onyx) 100% Of RAAAs Can Be Treated By EVAR With Low 30-Day Mortality And Turn Down Rates: Technical Tips
With Adjuncts (Chimney Grafts And Onyx) 100% Of RAAAs Can Be Treated By EVAR With Low 30-Day Mortality And Turn Down Rates: Technical Tips
abdominaladjunctsanesthesiaaorticBEVARBEVAR / Selective Gutter embolizationbrachcatheterchimneyChimney grafts with sealing below SMAcoagulationcohortcontraindicationsdeploydeployeddistalevarextendfavorableiliaclandingMedtronicmortalityNon adhesive liquid embolic agentocclusiononyxOnyx EmbolizationparallelpatientpatientsPercutaneous combined PG EVARperfusionproximalrupturedsealsealingsuprarenalSuprerenal Aneurysm / rPRAAtherapeuticthomastreatedtriplevisceral
Conformable Sheaths And Other New Techniques To Simplify And Improve The Outcomes Of F/B/EVAR: Upper Extremity Access May Become Largely Unnecessary
Conformable Sheaths And Other New Techniques To Simplify And Improve The Outcomes Of F/B/EVAR: Upper Extremity Access May Become Largely Unnecessary
(Flex introducer sheeth(Steerable guiding sheethaccessaneurysmapproachAptus TourguideballoonBEVARborebrachialceliaccontralateralDestino TwistdownwardDry SealFfenestrationFEVARfrenchglideGORE MedicalMedtronicOscor inc.renalrosenselectionsheathsheathsSteerable guiding sheathstentstrengthsSuprarenal AAA+Duplicated renal arteriestargettechniquetherapeuticvesselvesselswirewires
Value Of CO2 DSA For Abdominal And Pelvic Trauma: Why And How To Use CO2 Angiography With Massive Bleeding And When To Supplement It With Iodinated Contrast
Value Of CO2 DSA For Abdominal And Pelvic Trauma: Why And How To Use CO2 Angiography With Massive Bleeding And When To Supplement It With Iodinated Contrast
abdominalangiographyanterioraortaaorticarteriogrambasicallybleedingcarboncatheterceliaccoilcontrastdiaphragmdioxideembolizationholeimaginginjectinjectioninjectionsiodinatedliverlowmultiplepatientpelvicrenalruptureselectivesolublesplenictraumavascularizationveinvesselvesselsvolumes
More Effective Techniques Of Thrombolysis With Microbubbles And Ultrasound: Feasibility, Safety And Effectiveness In A Clinical Study (The MUST Trial)
More Effective Techniques Of Thrombolysis With Microbubbles And Ultrasound: Feasibility, Safety And Effectiveness In A Clinical Study (The MUST Trial)
acuteadversealteplaseangiographyarterialboluscontrastduplexendothelialfeasibilityhypersensitivityinfarctionintensityischaemiaischemiclimbmechanicalmicrobubblesmilligrammyocardialnanoparticlesnativeoccludedpatientsperipheralprostheticrevascularizationrutherfordsafetyTherapeutic / DiagnosticthrombolysisthrombolyticthrombolyticsthrombosedthrombustreatedtrialultrasoundurokinaseVeithvenous
Routine Use Of Ultrasound To Avoid Complications During Placement Of Tunneled Dialysis Catheters: Analysis Of 2805 Cases
Routine Use Of Ultrasound To Avoid Complications During Placement Of Tunneled Dialysis Catheters: Analysis Of 2805 Cases
angioplastyarteryballoonBalloon angioplastycannulationcathetercentralchronicallycomplicationsDialysisguidancejugularlesionliteraturemechanicaloccludedpatientsperformedplacementportionroutineroutinelystenoticsubsequenttunneledultrasoundunderwentveinwire
New Devices For False Lumen Obliteration With TBADs: Indications And Results
New Devices For False Lumen Obliteration With TBADs: Indications And Results
aneurysmangiographyaortaballooningCcentimeterdilatorendograftendovascularEndovascular DevicefenestratedgraftiliacimplantedlumenoccludeoccluderoccludersoccludesremodelingstentStent graftstentstechniqueTEVARtherapeuticthoracicthoracoabdominalVeithy-plugyplug
Sandwich Technique For Treating AAAs Involving The Common Iliac Bifurcations: Experience With 151 Hypogastric Revascularizations: Lessons Learned
Sandwich Technique For Treating AAAs Involving The Common Iliac Bifurcations: Experience With 151 Hypogastric Revascularizations: Lessons Learned
aneurysmarterybrachialcathetercentimeterclaudicationcomorbiditycomplicationsdiameterendograftendoleaksgorehypogastriciliaciliac arteryischemialatexlimblumenmajoritymidtermmortalityocclusionorthostaticpatientsperformedreinterventionrevascularizationssandwichstenttechniquetherapeutictreattypeviabahnwish Technique
Preloaded Catheters And Guidewires To Facilitate Branch Access During F/B/EVAR: How Do They Work: Advantages And Disadvantages
Preloaded Catheters And Guidewires To Facilitate Branch Access During F/B/EVAR: How Do They Work: Advantages And Disadvantages
accessaorticaxillarybranchbranchescathetercatheterizationcatheterschroniccomplexcontralateraldeviceevarevolvedexposureF/BEVARfenestratedfenestrationfenestrationsiliacindwellinginfrarenalischemialooplumensplacingpreexistingpreloadedRedo EVARrenalsheathwirewires
Update On Experience With The Valiant MONA LSA Single Branched TEVAR Device (From Medtronic) To Treat Lesions Involving The Aortic Arch
Update On Experience With The Valiant MONA LSA Single Branched TEVAR Device (From Medtronic) To Treat Lesions Involving The Aortic Arch
12mm BSG34 & 26 mm Distal Extentions to Celiac Artery34mm MSGaccessaneurysmangiogramaorticarteryballoonceliaccenterscomorbiditiesDescending Thoracic Aneurysm 55mmdevicedevicesdiametersendovascularenrollenrollmentfeasibilitygrafthelicalinvestigationalischemialeftmainMedtronicnitinolpatientpatientspivotalproximalrevascularizationstentstent graft systemsubclavianTEVARtherapeuticthoracicthrombusValiant Mona LSAwire
How To Use Hybrid Operating Rooms Optimally Beyond Vascular Procedures: How The Availability Of Mobile C-Arms Can Help
How To Use Hybrid Operating Rooms Optimally Beyond Vascular Procedures: How The Availability Of Mobile C-Arms Can Help
accessAscending Aortic Repair - Suture line DehiscenceaugmentbasicallyDirect Percutaneous Puncture - Percutaneous EmbolizationembolizationembolizefusionguidancehybridimagingincisionlaserlocalizationlungmodalitypatientscannedscannerTherapeutic / Diagnostictraumavascular
How Can Medical Holograms And 3D Imaging Be Helpful During Endovascular Procedures
How Can Medical Holograms And 3D Imaging Be Helpful During Endovascular Procedures
3D medical imagingaortaaugmentedcardiaccatheterCoreValve (Medtronic) - Transcatheter Aortic Valve Delivery Catheter System / TAVIguide (FEops) - Simulation technology / Holoscope (RealView Imaging) - 3D medical imagingDigital Light ShapingdynamicfloatingfocalfocusinteractmitralneedlepatientRealView ImagingsliceTherapeutic / DiagnosticvalveVeith
Technical Tips For Open Conversion After Failed EVAR
Technical Tips For Open Conversion After Failed EVAR
AAAacuteantibioticaortaaorticAorto-Venous ECMOballooncirculatoryclampCoil Embolization of IMAcoilingconverteddeviceendarterectomyendograftendoleakendovascularentiregraftgraftsiliacinfectedinjection of gluepatientproximalRelining of EndograftremoveremovedrenalresectedRifampicin soaked dacron graftsupersutureTEVARtherapeutictranslumbartype
How To Decrease Radiation Exposure To Operators And Assistants During Standard And Complex EVARs
How To Decrease Radiation Exposure To Operators And Assistants During Standard And Complex EVARs
advancedavoidingceliacdeclineddiagnosticdiscoverydoseendovascularevarfenestratedfindingfluoroscopicfluoroscopyframesfusionidealimagingminimizeminimizingoperatorpreoperativeradiationseptumstentsystem
Emerging REBOA Technologies: Lower Profile And Improved Balloon Catheters; Simpler Insertion Methods Without Imaging (Fluoro) And Partial Balloon Occlusion Techniques (6-Minute Talk)
Emerging REBOA Technologies: Lower Profile And Improved Balloon Catheters; Simpler Insertion Methods Without Imaging (Fluoro) And Partial Balloon Occlusion Techniques (6-Minute Talk)
activelyacuteballoonbleedingcathetercentersclinicaldefinitivedistalendovascularER-REBOAevolvinghemorrhageoptimalpatientpatientsportpressureprovidersPrytime MedicalREBOA (Resuscitative endovascular balloon occlusion of the aorta)resuscitationspectrumsurgeonsurgicaltechnologiestherapeutictitratetraumautilizeutilizedutilizing
"Acquired" AVMs: More Common Than We Think
acquiredarterialarteriogramarteriovenousavmscoilcollateralsconnectionsDeep vein trombosisduralDVTentityepisodeevarextensiveextremityfemoralFistulahistoryiliacinflammatorylesionlesionsocclusionpelvicpriorstentingstimulationswellingthrombosistreatedtreatmentuterineveinvenouswayne
Bailout Rescue Procedures When CEA Is Failing In A Critical Unstable Patient: ICA Stent Or Gore Hybrid Graft Or Standard PTFE Bypass: Indications For Each
Bailout Rescue Procedures When CEA Is Failing In A Critical Unstable Patient: ICA Stent Or Gore Hybrid Graft Or Standard PTFE Bypass: Indications For Each
anastomosisangiogrambailbypasscarotidCarotid bypassCEACFAdurableembolicendarterectomygoregrafthybridHybrid vascular graftinsertedlesionnitinolpatencypatientperioperativeproximalPTAptferestenosisstenosistechniquetransmuralvascular graft
Right Axillary Access For Complex EVARs And TEVARs: Advantages, Technical Tips And Preventing Strokes
Right Axillary Access For Complex EVARs And TEVARs: Advantages, Technical Tips And Preventing Strokes
accessaorticarcharteryaxillaryCHEVARchimneydevicesendovascularextremityfenestratedFEVARFEVARChminimizemortalitypatientRt Axillary Artery ConduitsheathsheathsstrokesutureTEVARvisceralzone
Technical Tips For The Management Of Cervical And Mediastinal Iatrogenic Artery Injuries: How To Avoid Disasters
Technical Tips For The Management Of Cervical And Mediastinal Iatrogenic Artery Injuries: How To Avoid Disasters
9F Sheath in Lt SCAAbbottaccessarterybrachialcarotidcatheterCordisDual Access (Rt Femora + SC sheath) ttt with suture mediated proglid over 0.035 inch wireendovascularfemoralfrenchgraftiatrogenicimaginginjuriesleftPer-Close suture mediated ProgliderangingsheathstentsubclaviantreatedvarietyvascularvenousvertebralVessel Closure Devicewire
Fully Percutaneous EVAR For RAAAs: Advantages, Contraindications And Technical Tips
Fully Percutaneous EVAR For RAAAs: Advantages, Contraindications And Technical Tips
abdominalaccessanesthesiaaneurysmaneurysmsaorticarterybaselinecolorconventionalcREVARcutdowndecreasedendovascularevarexposurefemoralimagingincreasedlengthMicropuncture TechniqueneedleoperativeoutcomespatientspercutaneousPEVARplacingregardrepairrepairsREVARRumel mediated Techniquerupturedsheathstatisticallysurgicalsuturestargettechniqueunderwentutilizing
Blueleaf Endovenous Valve: Potential Benefits Of An All-Autogenous Solution
Blueleaf Endovenous Valve: Potential Benefits Of An All-Autogenous Solution
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A RCT Comparing Medical Treatment vs. Thrombolysis And First Rib Resection For Venous TOS - Paget Schroetter Syndrome With Subclavian Vein Thrombosis
A RCT Comparing Medical Treatment vs. Thrombolysis And First Rib Resection For Venous TOS - Paget Schroetter Syndrome With Subclavian Vein Thrombosis
anticoagulationapproachbaselinecatheterCatheter-directed thrombolysisconservativedecompressiondeependpointextremityfavorFirst Rib Resectioninvasivemulticenterpatientpatientsprimaryrandomizationrandomizedrethrombosissyndrometherapythrombolysisthrombosistreatmenttrialupperveinvenographyvenousvillalta
Transcript

The other thing to do is in this deep pelvis,

other ways to get around bony structures is to take a transgluteal approach. The mantra for transgluteal approach in my mind is to hug the sacrum and stay below the piriformis as much as you can, in which this case demonstrates.

In order to minimize the risk of vascular injury to gluteal vessels, as well as entry into the cyatic nerves so hug the sacrum, and stay below the piriformis not quite below the piriformis here, but based on the anatomy this is where we had to go, and this allowed us to get to the small collection in the deep pelvis again, we're anteriorly, and posteriole/g [INAUDIBLE] Would

have been blocked by bone, and a variant to this technique, or an extension of this technique if you will. Is to utilize the power of the angled gantry. And as radiologists we always tend to think in 90 degrees. AP or lateral, frontal or lateral, but

we don't have to think. This gets us a little bit closer to ultrasound real time imaging we have a wide variety of angles to which you can approach lesions. With most CT scanners you can get about a 20 to 25 degree angulation. And sometimes anything within that range is enough to create a window

that avoids ball, avoids vessel, avoids bone. And so in this example that we utilize that angle again, the technique to find a window that gives us what we though was the most optimal approach to these deep pelvic lesions.

So just a series of cases really to think a little bit outside the box, how to dissection, moving things away, creating different angles and different approaches to get out some deep pelvic lesions. And thank you for your attention. I'm happy if

to take questions. Okay [BLANK_AUDIO] One last section which is the other way to get access to these deep pelvic lesions are transrectal or transvaginal approaches. Demonstrating sort of a technique that we use, an ultrasound probe cover over a transvaginal or prostate ultrasound

probe. This is the sheath of a pillow. The sheath that we affix using some elastic rubber bands. And use it in the transrectal or transvaginal approach. We gain access to give us very close proximity to deep pelvic lesions, and here's a case here demonstrating a collection behind the uterus

and to the rectum. And by ultrasound imaging you can see a needle coming in and there's our catheter finally in place, running into that colder sack behind the uterus and enter into the rectum. And the thing to keep in mind

this technique is often utilized at least the transrectal approach in pediatric patients. For the transvarginal approach, one thing to keep in mind is that the vaginal cuff is very, very, thick very muscular and certainly require some force to get through that.

Discussing this case with Dr. Agostino a few days ago he emphasized the point of minimizing the use of a speculum if you can. Because the speculum often times displaces and pushes your target further away just adding another element of challenge. So hydrodissection angled entry transvaginal transgluteal approaches.

Things to keep in mind, when you are approaching [UNKNOWN] Often times it migrate down into the pelvis. Can we have our IT, are they available? Looks like we've lost our signal here. Let me see.

[BLANK_AUDIO] Sorry about that we'll find somebody here in a moment. [SOUND] Any questions or clarifications or disagreements? >> How many of you do transvaginal and rectal drainages? [SOUND]

Do you use speculum or you do it without speculum? Who does it with speculum? >> [INAUDIBLE] >> It cannot clean and you can clean the vagina, well, you're gonna clean this rectum.

>> [INAUDIBLE] [BLANK_AUDIO] >> They're trying to find somebody [INAUDIBLE] >> Okay. Any questions regarding any of the previous discussions?

>> [INAUDIBLE] So we suture all our tubes into the skin, and one of the advantages of having a big tube, and it's a little bit of a selfish reason, but sometimes they do fall out and they fall out we're usually

on call on a Saturday night and we happen to be in the ER and when you have a tract that has been occupied by 24 French tube for several weeks, that is unblood type tract. And so I've gone down to ER, taken the tube, it's usually straight shot into the cavity,

advanced the tube without a wire without anything straight into the tract. And then the pus starts coming, coming right out. But to answer the main question I do suture directly to the skin. We've evolved a little bit,

we do [INAUDIBLE] And switch it to the disk, butterfly, start lock devices and that sort of thing for all sorts of drain/g. Nothing is as reliable as a [INAUDIBLE] Although that's as you know not 100% reliable as well. >> [INAUDIBLE]

>> No, no. We just create a mesentery, just one strike through the skin, create a little mesentery and just wrap around. >> Question?

>> [INAUDIBLE] At the time [INAUDIBLE] >> Yeah our usual protocol at the time of drainage is to evacuate everything that we can and then flush with three or four [UNKNOWN] Of normal saline just to clean things up. And then for the period of time the catheter remains,

we'll flush at least twice a day about 10 CCs. Of that 10 CCs about 5 go into keeping the catheter clear and the

- Good morning, thank you, Dr. Veith, for the invitation. My disclosures. So, renal artery anomalies, fairly rare. Renal ectopia and fusion, leading to horseshoe kidneys or pelvic kidneys, are fairly rare, in less than one percent of the population. Renal transplants, that is patients with existing

renal transplants who develop aneurysms, clearly these are patients who are 10 to 20 or more years beyond their initial transplantation, or maybe an increasing number of patients that are developing aneurysms and are treated. All of these involve a renal artery origin that is

near the aortic bifurcation or into the iliac arteries, making potential repair options limited. So this is a personal, clinical series, over an eight year span, when I was at the University of South Florida & Tampa, that's 18 patients, nine renal transplants, six congenital

pelvic kidneys, three horseshoe kidneys, with varied aorto-iliac aneurysmal pathologies, it leaves half of these patients have iliac artery pathologies on top of their aortic aneurysms, or in place of the making repair options fairly difficult. Over half of the patients had renal insufficiency

and renal protective maneuvers were used in all patients in this trial with those measures listed on the slide. All of these were elective cases, all were technically successful, with a fair amount of followup afterward. The reconstruction priorities or goals of the operation are to maintain blood flow to that atypical kidney,

except in circumstances where there were multiple renal arteries, and then a small accessory renal artery would be covered with a potential endovascular solution, and to exclude the aneurysms with adequate fixation lengths. So, in this experience, we were able, I was able to treat eight of the 18 patients with a fairly straightforward

endovascular solution, aorto-biiliac or aorto-aortic endografts. There were four patients all requiring open reconstructions without any obvious endovascular or hybrid options, but I'd like to focus on these hybrid options, several of these, an endohybrid approach using aorto-iliac

endografts, cross femoral bypass in some form of iliac embolization with an attempt to try to maintain flow to hypogastric arteries and maintain antegrade flow into that pelvic atypical renal artery, and a open hybrid approach where a renal artery can be transposed, and endografting a solution can be utilized.

The overall outcomes, fairly poor survival of these patients with a 50% survival at approximately two years, but there were no aortic related mortalities, all the renal artery reconstructions were patented last followup by Duplex or CT imaging. No aneurysms ruptures or aortic reinterventions or open

conversions were needed. So, focus specifically in a treatment algorithm, here in this complex group of patients, I think if the atypical renal artery comes off distal aorta, you have several treatment options. Most of these are going to be open, but if it is a small

accessory with multiple renal arteries, such as in certain cases of horseshoe kidneys, you may be able to get away with an endovascular approach with coverage of those small accessory arteries, an open hybrid approach which we utilized in a single case in the series with open transposition through a limited

incision from the distal aorta down to the distal iliac, and then actually a fenestrated endovascular repair of his complex aneurysm. Finally, an open approach, where direct aorto-ilio-femoral reconstruction with a bypass and reimplantation of that renal artery was done,

but in the patients with atypical renals off the iliac segment, I think you utilizing these endohybrid options can come up with some creative solutions, and utilize, if there is some common iliac occlusive disease or aneurysmal disease, you can maintain antegrade flow into these renal arteries from the pelvis

and utilize cross femoral bypass and contralateral occlusions. So, good options with AUIs, with an endohybrid approach in these difficult patients. Thank you.

- Thank you very much, Mr. Chairman. Thank you Frank Veith for the invitation, talking about, "SFA lesions can be treated endovascularly: "Should they be?" I do not have any potential conflict of interest for this presentation, and I would like to share with you. We have two ways: Is it technically feasible

to perform always reverse canalization by endovascular technique, and the SFA, and should we do it? And I would like to immediately conclude by it's possible for me to treat all the lesions by endovascular technique in the SFA and popliteal lesion, and for me, I think, for us it's always the first choice.

So, next: What we do to really need an SFA re-canalization and a SFA repair? To be well armed with guides and catheter to perform re-canalization, and it's necessary how to get by unusual ways:

retrograde puncture of each over. And the difficulty is to know if we perform subintimal re-canalization or not, and the success of this technique is always the reentry. So for me, I think it's very important to have a right and clear process when

you perform a re-canalization, and to treat by endovascular therapy, SFA, and popliteal lesion, and I think we can perform a first dilation with POVAR with a balloon superior of 1 mm, compared to the diameter of the SFA.

And it's very important to perform an inflation during three minutes and to follow with a slow deflation and a gentle removal. And stent to the diameter of the SFA, and maybe it's important to use, in certain cases of the DEB.

So the success keys: Is a good experience of re-canalization, a good knowledge of the devices, and a preparation of the vessel. For me, it's very important and the quality of the angiogram tube,

so I would like to share you some example. Here is the example, and a thrombosis occlusion of the whole SFA, and for me you can see on the angiogram the results and it's very important to have a disparation of the decrease of the collateral injection

on the angiogram. This is a case with a total occlusion of SFA in the stent And you can see on the angiogram thrombosis of the stent at the anterior, and I performed for this patient retrograde puncture inside the stent,

and I take the guide wire with the retrograde puncture with the snare and I treat the artery. So, to avoid an hematoma at the puncture it's necessary to inflate before the balloon inside the stent

after the re-canalization, and to remove the introducer and to let the inflation during five minutes. And so, another cases with the total occlusion of the SFA and a very good result, and a very difficult case with a lot of calcification, and it's possible to perform SFA endovascular repair with these techniques.

Okay, and a case, total occlusion SFA, popliteal artery, and the leg artery, and we perform a re-canalization and we use a third-generation stent, Supera, and to have a very good result. And in terms of results, what do the studies say? Analysis of endovascular therapy for femoropopliteal disease

with the Supera stent in Journal of Vascular Surgery shows primary patency is very good, at 90% at one year. Another study, the study with my colleagues, we've used a third-generation of stent with a very good result at 24 months. And open surgery and the estimated

five-year primary patency was 64%. Okay, and in conclusion: For me, "There is no impregna "There are only badly attacked citadels." Thank you very much for your attention.

- Thank you very much. After these beautiful two presentations a 4D ultrasound, it might look very old-fashioned to you. These are my disclosures. Last year, I presented on 4D ultrasound and the way how it can assess wall stress. Now, we know that from a biomechanical point,

it's clear that an aneurysm will rupture when the mechanical stress exceeds the local strength. So, it's important to know something about the state of the aortic wall, the mechanical properties and the stress that's all combined in the wall.

And that could be a better predictor for growth and potential rupture of the aneurysm. It has been performed peak wall stress analysis, using finite element analysis based on CT scan. Now, there has been a test looking at CT scans with and without rupture and given indication

what wall stress could predict in growth and rupture. Unfortunately, there has been no longitudinal studies to validate this system because of the limitations in radiation and nephrotoxic contrast. So, we thought that we could overcome these problems and building the possibilities for longitudinal studies

to do this similar assessment using ultrasound. As you can see here in this diagram in CT scan, mechanical properties and the wall thickness is fixed data based on the literature. Whereas with 3D ultrasound, you can get these mechanical properties from patient-specific imaging

that could give a more patient-specific mechanical AA model. We're still performing a longitudinal study. We started almost four years ago. We're following 320 patients, and every time when they come in surveillance, we perform a 3D ultrasound. I presented last year that we are able to,

with 3D ultrasound, we get adequate anatomy and the geometry is comparable to CT scan, and we get adequate wall stressors and mechanical parameters if we compare it with CT scan. Now, there are still some limitations in 3D ultrasound and that's the limited field of view and the cumbersome procedure and time-consuming procedures

to perform all the segmentation. So last year, we worked on increased field of view and automatic segmentation. As you can see, this is a single image where the aneurysm fits perfectly well in the field of view. But, when the aneurysm is larger, it will not fit

in a single view and you need multi-perspective imaging with multiple images that should be fused and so create one image in all. First, we perform the segmentation of the proximal and distal segment, and that's a segmentation algorithm that is

based on a well-established active deformable contour that was published in 1988 by Kass. Now, this is actually what we're doing. We're taking the proximal segment of the aneurysm. We're taking the distal segment. We perform the segmentation based on the algorithms,

and when we have the two images, we do a registration, sort of a merging of these imaging, first based on the central line. And then afterwards, there is an optimalisation of these images so that they finally perfectly fit on each other.

Once we've done that, we merge these data and we get the merged ultrasound data of a much larger field of view. And after that, we perform the final segmentation, as you can see here. By doing that, we have an increased field of view and we have an automatic segmentation system

that makes the procedure's analysis much and much less time-consuming. We validate it with CT scan and you can see that on the geometry, we have on the single assessment and the multi assessments, we have good similarity images. We also performed a verification on wall stress

and you can see that with these merged images, compared to CT scan, we get very good wall stress assessment compared to CT scan. Now, this is our view to the future. We believe that in a couple of years, we have all the algorithms aligned so that we can perform

a 3D ultrasound of the aorta, and we can see that based on the mechanical parameters that aneurysm is safe, or is maybe at risk, or as you see, when it's red, there is indication for surgery. This is where we want to go.

I give you a short sneak preview that we performed. We started the analysis of a longitudinal study and we're looking at if we could predict growth and rupture. As you can see on the left side, you see that we're looking at the wall stresses. There is no increase in wall stress in the patient

before the aneurysm ruptures. On the other side, there is a clear change in the stiffness of the aneurysm before it ruptures. So, it might be that wall stress is not a predictor for growth and rupture, but that mechanical parameters, like aneurysm stiffness, is a much better predictor.

But we hope to present on that more solid data next year. Thank you very much.

- Thank you again, Dr. Veith, for the kind invitation to talk about this topic. This year, these are my disclosure. In the last five years, we treated 76 cases of Fenestrated and Branched repair for torque abdominal unfit for open surgery. And we soon realized that the upper extremity access

is needed in almost up to 90% of the cases. The first cases were managed by standard cut down in high-brachial and brachial region, but as soon as we improved our skills in percutaneous approach for the groins, we moved also in a transaxillary and percutaneous access

in the area. What we learned from the tanvis group of Hamburg is that the best spot to puncture the artery is the first segment, so the segment within the clavicula and the pectoralis minor. And to do so it is mandatory to use an echoguidance

during the procedure. Here you can see how nicely you can evaluate your axillary artery and avoid puncture the artery through the pectoralis minor where there are nerves and collaterals and also collaterals of the vein. Here is short video you can see I'm puncturing

the axillary artery just below the clavicula with a short guide wire, we introduce 6 French sheath and then we place two proglides according to the instruction for use of the device for the femoral artery. And at the end we usually put a 9 French short sheet

and then we start the procedure. As soon as we are finished with the main body of the, finished with the graft and we have bridged all the vessels from below, we downsize the femoral access but we keep in one groin a 7 French sheath

in order to perform then the final closure. What we do as soon as we are finished the complete procedure we snare a wire from the femoral artery we push the seven French sheath in the axillary artery, we pull back the 12 French sheath in the axillary artery and then we are ready to unlink the two sheath

and so we push a wire in the axillary, from the axillary in the aorta, and one wire in the arm. So that we can deploy a balloon which is sized according to the axillary artery diameter we inflate the balloon and we remove the 12 French sheath and now it is possible to tie the knot of the proglide

over the balloon without any worry to have bleeding and we check with the wire then we remove the wire and then we tie the know of the proglide again. And we ensure that there is no defect and leaking on this region. We have done so far 50 cases and they are

enrolled in this study which is almost completed. And here you can see the results. We have mainly punctured the left side of the axillary, you can see that nicely the diameter of the axillary artery in this region is 8.9 millimeter the sheath size was mainly the 12 French

but we also use sometime the 16 in cases which on iliac was not available. And we also punctured the artery if there was a pacemaker or previous scar for cardiac operation. And here are the results you can see we had no open conversion, the technical success

was 92% of the cases because we are to deploy three cover stent to achieve complete sealing and one bare stent to treat dissection distally to the puncture site. We didn't have any false aneurysm on the follow up and arterial thrombosis and no nerve injuries

in the follow up. So for the discussion, if you look on the research where there are different approach in the discussion is called either to go for the first or the third segment we believe that the first segment is better because it is bigger, is more proximal

and there are no nerves in this region. And by proximalizing the approach you can also work from the right side of your patient so you don't need the guy left side of the table. Moreover, by having the 12 and the standard 19 seven french sheath you can enhance your pushability

here you can see that the 12 french sheath arrives close to the branch of renal artery and the seven french sheath is well within the renal branch. And here you can see where the hands of the operator are. Of course if you enhance this technique you can downsize contra arterial femoral sheath

needed to reach three vessels so maybe lowering your risk of limb ischemia and paraplegia and if you insert this approach in the femoral percutaneous approach, you can see that you can cut down your procedural time your OR occupation time and also

the need of post operative transfusion. So dear chairman and colleagues in conclusion, in our experience the first segment is the way to go. Echo guided puncture is mandatory. Balloon assisted removal is the safest way to do it. Our results prove that it's feasible and safe.

There are different potential advantages over branchial and cutdown. And we hope to collect more data to have more robust data to support this approach. Thank you.

- Nothing to disclose. This is a 19 year old female who was referred to us with abdominal pain. The pain had lasted a year and a half. She had epigastric pain. She had microscopic hematuria. Work up was done.

Notice the compression of the renal vein. Notice a selective venogram, and you can see it refluxes down. Here's an IVUS that demonstrates the narrowing. So, as most of you know, Nutcracker's compression of the left renal vein between the SMA and the aorta,

or the aorta and the vertebral body. Open transposition of left renal vein has been the conventional surgical therapy for this. The head is up here, feet are down here. The retroperitoneum has been taken back and reflected on to the abdominal wall

and you see the dissection proceeding here. I have to admit that this is speed up to about 1 1/2 times so that we could squeeze this in in under five minutes. You see the dissection, how nice it's cut out. Remember this is magnified 10 times.

Here you see the SMA and here's the area of the compression. Here you see the dissection of the contralateral vein. Cava is over here in the middle. Care is taken to identify and ligate the lumbar veins. We used to put clips on them,

but occasionally we've had a clip that slipped and it's a lot easier simply just to tie them off and divide them. Here you see one of the lumbars being tied off. This is really an important point we've learned in doing these cases.

Control is obtained vessel loops. Small clips placed on them and you can see where we are here, you see cava. We always sort of ... Here you'll see the adrenal vein being divided. That always mobilization.

We usually suture ligate the part on the cava because of the amount of bleeding that would cause if the clip popped off. We always leave a small clamp in here in the belly before we ligate anything,

before we open anything, that's sort of a just in case. Here we are immobilizing and dividing gonadals, ovarian veins and you can see the renal vein is basically skeletonized over here.

Here's cava over here and up top, flipped in the air, is your SMA. Now we're going to open the vein and you'll see us open and close it, but I want you to look at some point, in about a few seconds, we're actually going to show

you the web inside the vein after we close the cavotomy where the vein was just dissected off. We've switched from Prolene to Gore-tex. Here is the actual web being pulled out. She had an actual web right there and here is the more distal cavotomy.

Again we've sort of moved away from Prolene because we're fearful of the Prolene snapping. Because one of the problems with the robot is you really don't realize how hard you're pulling sometimes because there's no tactile feedback as you're using the robot.

Here's that extra clamp that I was talking about. The "just in case" as we call it. Here's your completed transposition of the renal vein. Incisions for ports. It's feasible, it's safe, it's effective. She went home the next day and I saw here in follow up.

She is about two years out now with no recurrent symptoms and doing well. Thank you very much.

- Thank you very much Tony, It's an honor to be part of this distinguished faculty. This is a landmark paper that truly revolutionized the management of Iliac vein disease, and you can see in this great experience of Doctor Raju and Neglen,

that primary disease, May-Thurner syndrome, can be treated with a secondary patency of 100% at five years and even in post traumatic patients, the secondary patency rate in this series was 86%. Now it was not immediately recognized that Contralateral Deep Vein Thrombosis is a problem.

In this paper, the authors mentioned that Contralateral Iliac Vein Thrombosis was generally benign and infrequent, 1%. The same group however with increasing experience recognized that some patients, who undergo Iliac Vein stenting have a problem if the stent is extended into the iliac vein.

And they did a comparative series where one group included wallstents that were extended into the inferior vena cava because of the underlying anatomy to correctly treat the disease. And the control group had Z-Stent on top of the wallstent which as you could see in the previous presentation

has much larger gaps between the metal struts. Wallstent in critical areas like under the compression of the right common iliac artery or even the groin can be compressed because of the construction of the stent. And you can see that there was a significant difference from Ipsilateral Deep Vein Thrombosis

if you used a stronger Z-Stent than if you used just a wall stent. But obviously the important finding is that there was a significantly higher rate of Contralateral Deep Vein Thrombosis if you extended the wall stent without protection

of the Z-Stent. Now there are additional papers that have come out since this publication. This is a combined European experience that, oh no actually, this is just the conclusion of the study that obviously

the Z-Stent modifications provides protection. But this is the European experience that only show that 4% had identified multiple factors in addition to extension like Acute disease, previous Contralateral Deep Vein Thrombosis or non-compliance with anticoagulation.

This paper however didn't really differentiate between extension and coverage, complete coverage of the Contralateral outflow. This is another paper from Dr. Gillespie group that again, thought that those patients who were non-compliant with anticoagulation,

those had an increased risk of Contralateral Deep Vein Thrombosis. Now this is a very important paper. It's 111 patients that was just recently published in the Jvir What is interesting in this patient

that Contralateral Deep Vein Thrombosis developed in 10 patients at a median time of 40 month after the operation. And I think that's very important. That this is not an early complication. This is a late complication.

And it's obvious from their findings, that you may not find a significant difference as long as you partially cover the iliac vein. But if you completely cover the iliac vein, 32% of these patients had Contralateral Deep Vein Thrombosis with a significant difference.

We found that in our experience too that when we explanted a stent that the outflow was practically already halfway thrombosed and you can see the pseudointima that really depends on the poor size of the stent. And that's why actually any stent

that has this small size has a problem. And so we called to abandon on extending the wallstent into the inferior vena cava. I think the take home message now that you should remember is that overextension of the iliac vein stent into the IVC and completely covering the inflow

from the Contralateral Iliac Vein is obviously a clear and present danger of delayed, not early, delayed Contralateral Deep Vein Thrombosis. Thank you.

- We are talking about the current management of bleeding hemodialysis fistulas. I have no relevant disclosures. And as we can see there with bleeding fistulas, they can occur, you can imagine that the patient is getting access three times a week so ulcerations can't develop

and if they are not checked, the scab falls out and you get subsequent bleeding that can be fatal and lead to some significant morbidity. So fatal vascular access hemorrhage. What are the causes? So number one is thinking about

the excessive anticoagulation during dialysis, specifically Heparin during the dialysis circuit as well as with cumin and Xarelto. Intentional patient manipulati we always think of that when they move,

the needles can come out and then you get subsequent bleeding. But more specifically for us, we look at more the compromising integrity of the vascular access. Looking at stenosis, thrombosis, ulceration and infection. Ellingson and others in 2012 looked at the experience

in the US specifically in Maryland. Between the years of 2000/2006, they had a total of sixteen hundred roughly dialysis death, due to fatal vascular access hemorrhage, which only accounted for about .4% of all HD or hemodialysis death but the majority did come

from AV grafts less so from central venous catheters. But interestingly that around 78% really had this hemorrhage at home so it wasn't really done or they had experienced this at the dialysis centers. At the New Zealand experience and Australia, they had over a 14 year period which

they reviewed their fatal vascular access hemorrhage and what was interesting to see that around four weeks there was an inciting infection preceding the actual event. That was more than half the patients there. There was some other patients who had decoags and revisional surgery prior to the inciting event.

So can the access be salvaged. Well, the first thing obviously is direct pressure. Try to avoid tourniquet specifically for the patients at home. If they are in the emergency department, there is obviously something that can be done.

Just to decrease the morbidity that might be associated with potential limb loss. Suture repairs is kind of the main stay when you have a patient in the emergency department. And then depending on that, you decide to go to the operating room.

Perera and others 2013 and this is an emergency department review and emergency medicine, they use cyanoacrylate to control the bleeding for very small ulcerations. They had around 10 patients and they said that they had pretty good results.

But they did not look at the long term patency of these fistulas or recurrence. An interesting way to kind of manage an ulcerated bleeding fistula is the Limberg skin flap by Pirozzi and others in 2013 where they used an adjacent skin flap, a rhomboid skin flap

and they would get that approximal distal vascular control, rotate the flap over the ulcerated lesion after excising and repairing the venotomy and doing the closure. This was limited to only ulcerations that were less than 20mm.

When you look at the results, they have around 25 AV fistulas, around 15 AV grafts. The majority of the patients were treated with percutaneous angioplasty at least within a week of surgery. Within a month, their primary patency was running 96% for those fistulas and around 80% for AV grafts.

If you look at the six months patency, 76% were still opened and the fistula group and around 40% in the AV grafts. But interesting, you would think that rotating an adjacent skin flap may lead to necrosis but they had very little necrosis

of those flaps. Inui and others at the UC San Diego looked at their experience at dialysis access hemorrhage, they had a total 26 patients, interesting the majority of those patients were AV grafts patients that had either bovine graft

or PTFE and then aneurysmal fistulas being the rest. 18 were actually seen in the ED with active bleeding and were suture control. A minor amount of patients that did require tourniquet for a shock. This is kind of the algorithm when they look at

how they approach it, you know, obviously secure your proximal di they would do a Duplex ultrasound in the OR to assess hat type of procedure

they were going to do. You know, there were inciting events were always infection so they were very concerned by that. And they would obviously excise out the skin lesion and if they needed interposition graft replacement they would use a Rifampin soak PTFE

as well as Acuseal for immediate cannulation. Irrigation of the infected site were also done and using an impregnated antibiotic Vitagel was also done for the PTFE grafts. They were really successful in salvaging these fistulas and grafts at 85% success rate with 19 interposition

a patency was around 14 months for these patients. At UCS, my kind of approach to dealing with these ulcerated fistulas. Specifically if they bleed is to use

the bovine carotid artery graft. There's a paper that'll be coming out next month in JVS, but we looked at just in general our experience with aneurysmal and primary fistula creation with an AV with the carotid graft and we tried to approach these with early access so imagine with

a bleeding patient, you try to avoid using catheter if possible and placing the Artegraft gives us an opportunity to do that and with our data, there was no significant difference in the patency between early access and the standardized view of ten days on the Artegraft.

Prevention of the Fatal Vascular Access Hemorrhages. Important physical exam on a routine basis by the dialysis centers is imperative. If there is any scabbing or frank infection they should notify the surgeon immediately. Button Hole technique should be abandoned

even though it might be easier for the patient and decreased pain, it does increase infection because of that tract The rope ladder technique is more preferred way to avoid this. In the KDOQI guidelines of how else can we prevent this,

well, we know that aneurysmal fistulas can ulcerate so we look for any skin that might be compromised, we look for any risk of rupture of these aneurysms which rarely occur but it still needs to taken care of. Pseudoaneurysms we look at the diameter if it's twice the area of the graft.

If there is any difficulty in achieving hemostasis and then any obviously spontaneous bleeding from the sites. And the endovascular approach would be to put a stent graft across the pseudoaneurysms. Shah and others in 2012 had 100% immediate technical success They were able to have immediate access to the fistula

but they did have around 18.5% failure rate due to infection and thrombosis. So in conclusion, bleeding to hemodialysis access is rarely fatal but there are various ways to salvage this and we tried to keep the access viable for these patients.

Prevention is vital and educating our patients and dialysis centers is key. Thank you.

- [Speaker] Good morning everybody thanks for attending the session and again thanks for the invitation. These are my disclosures. I will start by illustrating one of the cases where we did not use cone beam CT and evidently there were numerous mistakes on this

from planning to conducting the case. But we didn't notice on the completion of geography in folding of the stent which was very clearly apparent on the first CT scan. Fortunately we were able to revise this and have a good outcome.

That certainly led to unnecessary re intervention. We have looked at over the years our usage of fusion and cone beam and as you can see for fenestrated cases, pretty much this was incorporated routinely in our practice in the later part of the experience.

When we looked at the study of the patients that didn't have the cone beam CT, eight percent had re intervention from a technical problem that was potentially avoidable and on the group that had cone beam CT, eight percent had findings that were immediately revised with no

re interventions that were potentially avoidable. This is the concept of our GE Discovery System with fusion and the ability to do cone beam CT. Our protocol includes two spins. First we do one without contrast to evaluate calcification and other artifacts and also to generate a rotational DSA.

That can be also analyzed on axial coronal with a 3D reconstruction. Which essentially evaluates the segment that was treated, whether it was the arch on the arch branch on a thoracoabdominal or aortoiliac segment.

We have recently conducted a prospective non-randomized study that was presented at the Vascular Annual Meeting by Dr. Tenario. On this study, we looked at findings that were to prompt an immediate re intervention that is either a type one

or a type 3 endoleak or a severe stent compression. This was a prospective study so we could be judged for being over cautious but 25% of the procedures had 52 positive findings. That included most often a stent compression or kink in 17% a type one or three endoleak

in 9% or a minority with dissection and thrombus. Evidently not all this triggered an immediate revision, but 16% we elected to treat because we thought it was potentially going to lead to a bad complication. Here is a case where on the completion selective angiography

of the SMA this apparently looks very good without any lesions. However on the cone beam CT, you can see on the axial view a dissection flap. We immediately re catheterized the SMA. You note here there is abrupt stop of the SMA.

We were unable to catheterize this with a blood wire. That led to a conversion where after proximal control we opened the SMA. There was a dissection flap which was excised using balloon control in the stent as proximal control.

We placed a patch and we got a good result with no complications. But considerably, if this patient was missed in the OR and found hours after the procedure he would have major mesenteric ischemia. On this study, DSA alone would have missed

positive findings in 34 of the 43 procedures, or 79% of the procedures that had positive findings including 21 of the 28 that triggered immediate revision. There were only four procedures. 2% had additional findings on the CT

that were not detectable by either the DSA or cone beam CT. And those were usually in the femoro puncture. For example one of the patients had a femoro puncture occlusion that was noted immediately by the femoro pulse.

The DSA accounts for approximately 20% of our total radiation dose. However, it allows us to eliminate CT post operatively which was done as part of this protocol, and therefore the amount of radiation exposed for the patient

was decreased by 55-65% in addition to the cost containment of avoiding this first CT scan in our prospective protocol. In conclusion cone beam CT has allowed immediate assessment to identify technical problems that are not easily detectable by DSA.

These immediate revisions may avoid unnecessary re interventions. What to do if you don't have it? You have to be aware that this procedure that are complex, they are bound to have some technical mistakes. You have to have incredible attention to detail.

Evidently the procedures can be done, but you would have to have a low threshold to revise. For example a flared stent if the dilator of the relic gleam or the dilator of you bifurcated devise encroach the stent during parts of the procedure. Thank you very much.

(audience applauding)

- Thank you. I have two talks because Dr. Gaverde, I understand, is not well, so we- - [Man] Thank you very much. - We just merged the two talks. All right, it's a little joke. For today's talk we used fusion technology

to merge two talks on fusion technology. Hopefully the rest of the talk will be a little better than that. (laughs) I think we all know from doing endovascular aortic interventions

that you can be fooled by the 2D image and here's a real life view of how that can be an issue. I don't think I need to convince anyone in this room that 3D fusion imaging is essential for complex aortic work. Studies have clearly shown it decreases radiation,

it decreases fluoro time, and decreases contrast use, and I'll just point out that these data are derived from the standard mechanical based systems. And I'll be talking about a cloud-based system that's an alternative that has some advantages. So these traditional mechanical based 3D fusion images,

as I mentioned, do have some limitations. First of all, most of them require manual registration which can be cumbersome and time consuming. Think one big issue is the hardware based tracking system that they use. So they track the table rather than the patient

and certainly, as the table moves, and you move against the table, the patient is going to move relative to the table, and those images become unreliable. And then finally, the holy grail of all 3D fusion imaging is the distortion of pre-operative anatomy

by the wires and hardware that are introduced during the course of your procedure. And one thing I'd like to discuss is the possibility that deep machine learning might lead to a solution to these issues. How does 3D fusion, image-based 3D fusion work?

Well, you start, of course with your pre-operative CT dataset and then you create digitally reconstructed radiographs, which are derived from the pre-op CTA and these are images that resemble the fluoro image. And then tracking is done based on the identification

of two or more vertebral bodies and an automated algorithm matches the most appropriate DRR to the live fluoro image. Sounds like a lot of gobbledygook but let me explain how that works. So here is the AI machine learning,

matching what it recognizes as the vertebral bodies from the pre-operative CT scan to the fluoro image. And again, you get the CT plus the fluoro and then you can see the overlay with the green. And here's another version of that or view of that.

You can see the AI machine learning, identifying the vertebral bodies and then on your right you can see the fusion image. So just, once again, the AI recognizes the bony anatomy and it's going to register the CT with the fluoro image. It tracks the patient, not the table.

And the other thing that's really important is that it recognizes the postural change that the patient undergoes between the posture during the CT scan, versus the posture on the OR table usually, or often, under general anesthesia. And here is an image of the final overlay.

And you can see the visceral and renal arteries with orange circles to identify them. You can remove those, you can remove any of those if you like. This is the workflow. First thing you do is to upload the CT scan to the cloud.

Then, when you're ready to perform the procedure, that is downloaded onto the medical grade PC that's in your OR next to your fluoro screen, and as soon as you just step on the fluoro pedal, the CYDAR overlay appears next to your, or on top of your fluoro image,

next to your regular live fluoro image. And every time you move the table, the computer learning recognizes that the images change, and in a couple of seconds, it replaces with a new overlay based on the obliquity or table position that you have. There are some additional advantages

to cloud-based technology over mechanical technology. First of all, of course, or hardware type technology. Excuse me. You can upgrade it in real time as opposed to needing intermittent hardware upgrades. Works with any fluoro equipment, including a C-arm,

so you don't have to match your 3D imaging to the brand of your fluoro imaging. And there's enhanced accuracy compared to mechanical registration systems as imaging. So what are the clinical applications that this can be utilized for?

Fluoroscopy guided endovascular procedures in the lower thorax, abdomen, and pelvis, so that includes EVAR and FEVAR, mid distal TEVAR. At present, we do need two vertebral bodies and that does limit the use in TEVAR. And then angioplasty stenting and embolization

of common iliac, proximal external and proximal internal iliac artery. Anything where you can acquire a vertebral body image. So here, just a couple of examples of some additional non EVAR/FEVAR/TEVAR applications. This is, these are some cases

of internal iliac embolization, aortoiliac occlusion crossing, standard EVAR, complex EVAR. And I think then, that the final thing that I'd like to talk about is the use with C-arm, which is think is really, extremely important.

Has the potential to make a very big difference. All of us in our larger OR suites, know that we are short on hybrid availability, and yet it's difficult to get our institutions to build us another hybrid room. But if you could use a high quality 3D fusion imaging

with a high quality C-arm, you really expand your endovascular capability within the operating room in a much less expensive way. And then if you look at another set of circumstances where people don't have a hybrid room at all, but do want to be able to offer standard EVAR

to their patients, and perhaps maybe even basic FEVAR, if there is such a thing, and we could use good quality imaging to do that in the absence of an actual hybrid room. That would be extremely valuable to be able to extend good quality care

to patients in under-served areas. So I just was mentioning that we can use this and Tara Mastracci was talking yesterday about how happy she is with her new room where she has the use of CYDAR and an excellent C-arm and she feels that she is able to essentially run two rooms,

two hybrid rooms at once, using the full hybrid room and the C-arm hybrid room. Here's just one case of Dr. Goverde's. A vascular case that he did on a mobile C-arm with aortoiliac occlusive disease and he places kissing stents

using a CYDAR EV and a C-arm. And he used five mils of iodinated contrast. So let's talk about a little bit of data. This is out of Blain Demorell and Tara Mastrachi's group. And this is use of fusion technology in EVAR. And what they found was that the use of fusion imaging

reduced air kerma and DSA runs in standard EVAR. We also looked at our experience recently in EVAR and FEVAR and we compared our results. Pre-availability of image based fusion CT and post image based fusion CT. And just to clarify,

we did have the mechanical product that Phillip's offers, but we abandoned it after using it a half dozen times. So it's really no image fusion versus image fusion to be completely fair. We excluded patients that were urgent/emergent, parallel endographs, and IBEs.

And we looked at radiation exposure, contrast use, fluoro time, and procedure time. The demographics in the two groups were identical. We saw a statistically significant decrease in radiation dose using image based fusion CT. Statistically a significant reduction in fluoro time.

A reduction in contrast volume that looks significant, but was not. I'm guessing because of numbers. And a significantly different reduction in procedure time. So, in conclusion, image based 3D fusion CT decreases radiation exposure, fluoro time,

and procedure time. It does enable 3D overlays in all X-Ray sets, including mobile C-arm, expanding our capabilities for endovascular work. And image based 3D fusion CT has the potential to reduce costs

and improve clinical outcomes. Thank you.

- Thank you very much. I take over the presentation from Thomas Larzon, we, and different other people have the same approach to a ruptured triple A, trying to extend the advantages we have seen now, of an EVAR procedure in patients with inadequate anatomy, and to extend the limitation,

to patients with the less favorable anatomy. So, the concept of a ruptured EVAR has been already proven, with good research of three years, and I will build up, Thomas built up this presentation, on our so common experience that we published for fourteen years experience of two university centers,

performing EVAR on 100% of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms, over a 32 months period. So what we can see, is on the right side, this was the period where a part of the patient was treated by EVAR,

and the one that had not favorable anatomy were opened. On the left side, there is EVAR only, this a period 2009 to 11, you can see the effect of this change, is the operative cohort mortality moved from 26 to 24%, and total cohort mortality,

including to exclude the patient that are on feet, reduced from 33 to 27%. What changed also, is the protocol for anesthesia, so from a few patients that were treated under local anesthesia, actually, there are very few patients treated

just with general anesthesia primarily. What changed is the rejection rate, decreased from 10% to 4%, the age of the population treated increased, the part of women treated increased by 10%, and the amount of patients that are instable,

and treated, increased too. So, how to extend the limitation, the one is by using parallel grafts, or on table physician modified, extend graft to achieve what Benjamin does in his practice, a good seal proximal,

this is a three parallel graft, that worked very well. The other option, is to use Onyx for the distal landing zone, this is a technique that Thomas does use more liberally than we,

but is a good solution for patients where an IBD, for example, would not be possible, it doesn't require any special catheter, there is no contraindications due to tortuosity, and sealing is immediately obtained. Here, an example,

the aortoiliac, the main trunk, has been deployed here, then a (mumbles), the iliac extension is parked, can be deployed later, and as a Buddy catheter,

you can take a Bernstein catheter, you just position it in the origin of the hypogastric, or in the common iliac artery. Then, you deploy the distal extension, there is no more flow, slowly you'll stepwise,

5-10cc of Onyx can be applied, this allows to preserve the distal perfusion of the hypogastric, and to seal it. Sealing can also, with Onyx, can also be used in the proximal landing zone, there are two options,

here, the option with an instable patient that gets two parallel graphs with the remaining type 1 endoleak, you introduce your catheter through the leak, or the catheter inside the sack that is perfused, step wise, you will apply your Onyx.

Here, in another patient, of our experience, this is a suprarenal arteries after a triple A repair with EVAR that comes with the rupture, we combined here a chimney for the SMA, with a double brach device from Biotech,

deploy this, and you can see here there will be some leak. So, three days later, because the leak didn't have to do coagulation correct, once correct it didn't seal, we just very selectively, improvised with Onyx, the gap,

this is a three months outcome. Then, here a case of some Post EVAR with a type 1A endoleak, to extend this on the visceral aorta would have been very complex, this is why doctor Larson decided here just

to fill the whole sac with 60cc of Onyx, which worked very well. So, in Orebro, you can see that the 30-day mortality is 27%, the 90-day mortality is 30%, then the whole cohort,

including the 10% that have been excluded, has a mortality of 37 and 34%. From the different factor that was significant, you can see that local anesthesia works good, Aortic Balloon Occlusion works good, mortality in patients

with abdominal compartment syndrome is increased, mortality of patients in shock is increased, and finally, the mortality of patients having this adjunct procedure is not significantly increased, this holds true for the long-term outcomes.

So, we can see that by using adjuncts, every patient with a ruptured triple A can be offered an EVAR, eventually as a bridging procedure, chimney grafts can extend landing zones, Onyx can offer additional sealing options,

and valid long-term results for adjuncts has been proven. Thank you very much for your attention.

- Thank you Dr. Veith and Dr. Helan for the honor of the podium and for being included in this very prestigious panel. I appreciate it greatly. These are my disclosures. So there's a number of established strategies with fenestrated EVAR to overcome some of the challenges

that we face during these procedures. For downward oriented target arteries we employ brachial access, we deflect wires and catheters off of the top cap or a balloon that can be inflated. Fixed angle sheaths,

getting access into the target vessels can be accomplished by swallowing the balloon or replace a balloon into the target vessel first, inflate it and then deflate it while we're pushing forward on the sheath. And also the large bore femoral access

on the contralateral side allows us to have multiple access sites, multiple sheaths, but this oftentimes requires 20, 22 French sheaths to accomplish this. Well this standard FEVAR technique is what I adopted when I first went out into practice

and as often is the case, necessity becomes the mother of invention. And when we lost access to the beacon tip Van Schie catheters, we had to come up with alternative techniques for gaining access to these vessels

and for accomplishing these procedures. And what this strategy has eventually evolved in to is what I've coined as next generation FEVAR, and I take a slightly different approach from the well-established techniques. And these are the ancillaries that you need

to perform these procedures. The main thing is the conformable sheaths which has completely changed my approach to doing these procedures. And I'll show you a single case that illustrates many of the strengths of these conformable sheaths

and the strengths of this technique. But the conformable sheaths that are available in the United States are twofold. The Oscor Destino Twist, which is available in 6.5, seven French, and 8.5 French. There's also a 12 French sheath available as well

with variable deflection curves. The Aptus TourGuide is actually manufactured by Oscor and sold through an OEM to now Medtronic, but it is exactly the same type of the conformable sheath available in the same sizes and deflectable curves.

As far as our contralateral sheath, what I've found with this technique is that we've been able to significantly downsize the contralateral sheath to allow access by only using Rosen wires and leaving Rosen wires only behind in most of

the selected and wired vessels. This is a 16 French and now what I employ is a 14 French dry seal in almost all of our cases. So this is a patient with a juxtarenal aneurysm that had an accessory lower pole or duplicated left renal and a rather large IMA

that we incorporated through a PMAG design in the, in his repair. And this video shows the conformable sheath acting as not only the sheath but the selection catheter as it goes in to the fenestration and out into the target artery.

As we move to the next step, the glide wire then is passed into the vessel followed by a quick cross catheter, and then we exchange the glide wire for a Rosen, and then leave the Rosen behind and move on to the next vessel.

This is selection of the celiac and then selection of the right renal. And then the left renal. And actually we were able to get the second renal as well with this setup. This is one of the,

so this is delivering the stent to the celiac as we move back up and we kind of just reverse the order as we go back to one of the first vessels that we selected. And we would never attempt this maneuver with a fixed angled sheath. But the strength of the conformable sheath

allows it to maintain its shape and actually throw the stent across the fenestration and into the vessel rather than having the sheath into the target vessel and unsheathing it. We then can use the conformable sheath to select downward deflected branches as the IMAs illustrates.

And on the one month post-CTA all vessels are stented, widely patent, aneurysm sac has actually begun to shrink, and this is our 3D rendering of that one month CTA. So with my move I started keeping track of the amount of time it takes to catheterize these vessels. Real time from the start of catheterization to the end

of the final vessel being catheterized. And we did this in 57 consecutive cases with a total of 215 total fenestrations. I used brachial access not at all during any of these cases and we recorded this time. And what we found in those 57 cases

is that we had a mean of 30 minutes from the time we put the conformable sheath in to the time we were done selecting all of the vessels, that all the target vessels and had Rosen wires in those vessels. When we subtracted out the few outliers that we had

with high grade stenoses or extreme angulated origins, we ended up with a mean and a median that came together at about 21 minutes. The cost comparison has been raised as an issue, but when you actually only use one sheath it's actually cheaper to use the conformable approach

and it doesn't take into account the billed hybrid OR time which can be upwards of $200 per minute. The cost of brachial access and decreased target cannulation wire time. So in summary FEVAR with this approach and with conformable sheaths

facilitates selection of fenestrations, downward deflected branches and target arteries. It avoids the complications of brachial access and large bore contralateral sheaths. It provides additional stability to allow delivery of appropriately sized covered stents

and it simplifies the technique and decreases the costs. Thank you.

- Thank you very much for the opportunity to speak carbon dioxide angiography, which is one of my favorite topics and today I will like to talk to you about the value of CO2 angiography for abdominal and pelvic trauma and why and how to use carbon dioxide angiography with massive bleeding and when to supplement CO2 with iodinated contrast.

Disclosures, none. The value of CO2 angiography, what are the advantages perhaps? Carbon dioxide is non-allergic and non-nephrotoxic contrast agent, meaning CO2 is the only proven safe contrast in patients with a contrast allergy and the renal failure.

Carbon dioxide is very highly soluble (20 to 30 times more soluble than oxygen). It's very low viscosity, which is a very unique physical property that you can take advantage of it in doing angiography and CO2 is 1/400 iodinated contrast in viscosity.

Because of low viscosity, now we can use smaller catheter, like a micro-catheter, coaxially to the angiogram using end hole catheter. You do not need five hole catheter such as Pigtail. Also, because of low viscosity, you can detect bleeding much more efficiently.

It demonstrates to the aneurysm and arteriovenous fistula. The other interesting part of the CO2 when you inject in the vessel the CO2 basically refluxes back so you can see the more central vessel. In other words, when you inject contrast, you see only forward vessel, whereas when you inject CO2,

you do a pass with not only peripheral vessels and also see more central vessels. So basically you see the vessels around the lesions and you can use unlimited volumes of CO2 if you separate two to three minutes because CO2 is exhaled by the respirations

so basically you can inject large volumes particularly when you have long prolonged procedures, and most importantly, CO2 is very inexpensive. Where there are basically two methods that will deliver CO2. One is the plastic bag system which you basically fill up with a CO2 tank three times and then empty three times

and keep the fourth time and then you connect to the delivery system and basically closest inject for DSA. The other devices, the CO2mmander with the angio assist, which I saw in the booth outside. That's FDA approved for CO2 injections and is very convenient to use.

It's called CO2mmander. So, most of the CO2 angios can be done with end hole catheter. So basically you eliminate the need for pigtail. You can use any of these cobra catheters, shepherd hook and the Simmons.

If you look at this image in the Levitor study with vascular model, when you inject end hole catheter when the CO2 exits from the tip of catheter, it forms very homogenous bolus, displaces the blood because you're imaging the blood vessel by displacing blood with contrast is mixed with blood, therefore as CO2

travels distally it maintains the CO2 density whereas contrast dilutes and lose the densities. So we recommend end hole catheter. So that means you can do an arteriogram with end hole catheter and then do a select arteriogram. You don't need to replace the pigtail

for selective injection following your aortographies. Here's the basic techniques: Now when you do CO2 angiogram, trauma patient, abdominal/pelvic traumas, start with CO2 aortography. You'll be surprised, you'll see many of those bleeding on aortogram, and also you can repeat, if necessary,

with CO2 at the multiple different levels like, celiac, renal, or aortic bifurcation but be sure to inject below diaphragm. Do not go above diaphragm, for example, thoracic aorta coronary, and brachial, and the subclavian if you inject CO2, you'll have some serious problems.

So stay below the diaphragm as an arterial contrast. Selective injection iodinated contrast for a road map. We like to do super selective arteriogram for embolization et cetera. Then use a contrast to get anomalies. Super selective injection with iodinated contrast

before embolization if there's no bleeding then repeat with CO2 because of low viscocity and also explosion of the gas you will often see the bleeding. That makes it more comfortable before embolization. Here is a splenic trauma patient.

CO2 is injected into the aorta at the level of the celiac access. Now you see the extra vascularization from the low polar spleen, then you catheterize celiac access of the veins. You microcatheter in the distal splenic arteries

and inject the contrast. Oops, there's no bleeding. Make you very uncomfortable for embolizations. We always like to see the actual vascularization before place particle or coils. At that time you can inject CO2 and you can see

actual vascularization and make you more comfortable before embolization. You can inject CO2, the selective injection like in here in a patient with the splenic trauma. The celiac injection of CO2 shows the growth, laceration splenic with extra vascularization with the gas.

There's multiple small, little collection. We call this Starry Night by Van Gogh. That means malpighian marginal sinus with stagnation with the CO2 gives multiple globular appearance of the stars called Starry Night.

You can see the early filling of the portal vein because of disruption of the intrasplenic microvascular structures. Now you see the splenic vein. Normally, you shouldn't see splenic vein while following CO2 injections.

This is a case of the liver traumas. Because the liver is a little more anterior the celiac that is coming off of the anterior aspect of the aorta, therefore, CO2 likes to go there because of buoyancy so we take advantage of buoyancy. Now you see the rupture here in this liver

with following the aortic injections then you inject contrast in the celiac axis to get road map so you can travel through this torus anatomy for embolizations for the road map for with contrast. This patient with elaston loss

with ruptured venal arteries, massive bleeding from many renal rupture with retro peritoneal bleeding with CO2 and aortic injection and then you inject contrast into renal artery and coil embolization but I think the stent is very dangerous in a patient with elaston loss.

We want to really separate the renal artery. Then you're basically at the mercy of the bleeding. So we like a very soft coil but basically coil the entire renal arteries. That was done. - Thank you very much.

- Time is over already? - Yeah. - Oh, OK. Let's finish up. Arteriogram and we inject CO2 contrast twice. Here's the final conclusions.

CO2 is a valuable imaging modality for abdominal and pelvic trauma. Start with CO2 aortography, if indicated. Repeat injections at multiple levels below diaphragm and selective injection road map with contrast. The last advice fo

t air contamination during the CO2 angiograms. Thank you.

- So thank you ladies and gentleman, thank you Doctor Veith for inviting me again this year. These are my disclosures. So more effective thrombolysis by microbubbles and ultrasound has been proven actually effective in earlier studies, treating a myocardial infarction or acute ischemic stroke.

But what are these microbubbles? These are 1 to 10 micrometers, gas-filled bubbles with a lipid shell. It oscillate when subjected to low intensity ultrasound, and can cavitate when subjected to high intensity ultrasound. Initially they were designed for diagnostic use

as intravascular contrast enhancers. However, they have many advantages, non-specifical mechanical effects, to induce thrombus breakdown due to mechanical force of microbubbles if they are subjected to ultrasound. So we conducted the first human trial

in peripheral arterial diseases in Microbubbles and UltraSound-accelerated Thrombolysis, the MUST study for peripheral arterial occlusions. Which is a single phase two trial for actually safety and feasibility study. The MUST-TRIAl consist out of 20 patients

for safety and feasibility, which in 10 patients will be treated with Urokinase, and 10 with Alteplase. And then added, for the first hour, microbubbles and we evaluated the VAS pain scores, duplex echography for circulation or revascularization, microcirculation and daily angiography as usual.

Included were men and women 18 to 85 years. A maximum of two weeks of symptoms of lower limb ischaemia due to thrombosed or occluded lower limb peripheral native arteries or venous or prosthetic bypass grafts. And Rutherford class 1 or 2A. They have to understand the nature of the procedure

and written informed consent. And excluded were all known factors that exclude standard thrombolysis therapy, hypersensitivity to contrast enhanced agents, a recent acute coronary syndrome. Endpoints, again, it's a safety

and then a technical feasibility trial. Also we looked at the organisation, and the treatment duration for technical, angiographic, and clinical success. We looked at the severe adverse event and mortality rates, VAS-pain scores and microcirculation.

If the patients came in, we inform them about the MUST trail, we performed an ECG analysis and informed consent. They fill out some questionnaires and when they come in to the angio-room, we started a thrombolysis with a catheter, the Mc Nemara.

And the first group, the Urokinase 10 patients, we treated with 500 units of bolus and then continued with a 50,000 units of Urokinase per hour. The Alteplase group had started with a 5 milligram bolus and then they continued with 1 milligram per hour

for the first 24 hours. And then, the ultrasound room, they got a bubble infusion for the first hour of treatment. Then we would continue with thrombolysis on a surgical ward, every sixth hour we'd look at if there was revascularization at the duplex ultrasound.

And if signs of revascularization are observed on the duplex ultrasound or on the next day, we routinely perform the angiography. Then we could cessate the thrombolytic therapy, and if necessary, acute or elective additional intervention to correct underlying lesions,

or to establish patencies. We check the wound and then we follow-up these patients every six weeks, three months, 6 months, and one year after thrombolytic therapy. So these are the patient characteristics, mostly of these were male, 70 years,

and five of them were native bypass, and five were a bypass occlusion, venous or prosthetic. And two of them had multiple occlusions, whether Rutherford class 1 or 2A. And these were the first 10 patients that were treated with Urokinase and I will present here

the results of these 10 patients first. So, very important, there were no deaths, no severe adverse events, and it was technical feasible. The flow at the duplex examination was there after 24 hours, but most of our patients actually had it already after 6 hours.

The amputation rate, right now, is zero. And also no bypasses were now needed. So we will continue this MUST trial right now and January we probably will have the inclusion of the group with the Alteplase, which I'll present next year.

And we think that microbubbles with Urokinase is a safe combination right now. We will further include the groups of adults placed and further optimalisation of the microbubbles technique with nanobubbles. Had a talk about that yesterday, so you can look it up.

And nanobubbles are nanoparticles of 5 to 500 nanometers, which are very small, they do not penetrate the endothelial barrier of the doubt and it damage. And it can carry the thrombolytics actually to the side the aorta catheter need it. You can also make the magnetic paste,

which means you can paste these patients on the MRI. Then you can have local treatment of thrombolytic therapy. So thank you for your attention.

- I want to thank the organizers for putting together such an excellent symposium. This is quite unique in our field. So the number of dialysis patients in the US is on the order of 700 thousand as of 2015, which is the last USRDS that's available. The reality is that adrenal disease is increasing worldwide

and the need for access is increasing. Of course fistula first is an important portion of what we do for these patients. But the reality is 80 to 90% of these patients end up starting with a tunneled dialysis catheter. While placement of a tunneled dialysis catheter

is considered fairly routine, it's also clearly associated with a small chance of mechanical complications on the order of 1% at least with bleeding or hema pneumothorax. And when we've looked through the literature, we can notice that these issues

that have been looked at have been, the literature is somewhat old. It seemed to be at variance of what our clinical practice was. So we decided, let's go look back at our data. Inpatients who underwent placement

of a tunneled dialysis catheter between 1998 and 2017 reviewed all their catheters. These are all inpatients. We have a 2,220 Tesio catheter places, in 1,400 different patients. 93% of them placed on the right side

and all the catheters were placed with ultrasound guidance for the puncture. Now the puncture in general was performed with an 18 gauge needle. However, if we notice that the vein was somewhat collapsing with respiratory variation,

then we would use a routinely use a micropuncture set. All of the patients after the procedures had chest x-ray performed at the end of the procedure. Just to document that everything was okay. The patients had the classic risk factors that you'd expect. They're old, diabetes, hypertension,

coronary artery disease, et cetera. In this consecutive series, we had no case of post operative hemo or pneumothorax. We had two cut downs, however, for arterial bleeding from branches of the external carotid artery that we couldn't see very well,

and when we took out the dilator, patient started to bleed. We had three patients in the series that had to have a subsequent revision of the catheter due to mal positioning of the catheter. We suggest that using modern day techniques

with ultrasound guidance that you can minimize your incidents of mechanical complications for tunnel dialysis catheter placement. We also suggest that other centers need to confirm this data using ultrasound guidance as a routine portion of the cannulation

of the internal jugular veins. The KDOQI guidelines actually do suggest the routine use of duplex ultrasonography for placement of tunnel dialysis catheters, but this really hasn't been incorporated in much of the literature outside of KDOQI.

We would suggest that it may actually be something that may be worth putting into the surgical critical care literature also. Now having said that, not everything was all roses. We did have some cases where things didn't go

so straight forward. We want to drill down a little bit into this also. We had 35 patients when we put, after we cannulated the vein, we can see that it was patent. If it wasn't we'd go to the other side

or do something else. But in 35%, 35 patients, we can put the needle into the vein and get good flashback but the wire won't go down into the central circulation.

Those patients, we would routinely do a venogram, we would try to cross the lesion if we saw a lesion. If it was a chronically occluded vein, and we weren't able to cross it, we would just go to another site. Those venograms, however, gave us some information.

On occasion, the vein which is torturous for some reason or another, we did a venogram, it was torturous. We rolled across the vein and completed the procedure. In six of the patients, the veins were chronically occluded

and we had to go someplace else. In 20 patients, however, they had prior cannulation in the central vein at some time, remote. There was a severe stenosis of the intrathoracic veins. In 19 of those cases, we were able to cross the lesion in the central veins.

Do a balloon angioplasty with an 8 millimeter balloon and then place the catheter. One additional case, however, do the balloon angioplasty but we were still not able to place the catheter and we had to go to another site.

Seven of these lesions underwent balloon angioplasty of the innominate vein. 11 of them were in the proximal internal jugular vein, and two of them were in the superior vena cava. We had no subsequent severe swelling of the neck, arm, or face,

despite having a stenotic vein that we just put a catheter into, and no subsequent DVT on duplexes that were obtained after these procedures. Based on these data, we suggest that venous balloon angioplasty can be used in these patients

to maintain the site of an access, even with the stenotic vein that if your wire doesn't go down on the first pass, don't abandon the vein, shoot a little dye, see what the problem is,

and you may be able to use that vein still and maintain the other arm for AV access or fistular graft or whatever they need. Based upon these data, we feel that using ultrasound guidance should be a routine portion of these procedures,

and venoplasty should be performed when the wire is not passing for a central vein problem. Thank you.

- Thank you (mumbles) and thank you Dr. Veith for the kind invitation to participate in this amazing meeting. This is work from Hamburg mainly and we all know that TEVAR is the first endovascular treatment of choice but a third of our patients will fail to remodel and that's due to the consistent and persistent

flow in the false lumen over the re-entrance in the thoracoabdominal aorta. Therefore it makes sense to try to divide the compartments of the aorta and try to occlude flow in the false lumen and this can be tried by several means as coils, plug and glue

but also iliac occluders but they all have the disadvantage that they don't get over 24 mm which is usually not enough to occlude the false lumen. Therefore my colleague, Tilo Kolbel came up with this first idea with using

a pre-bulged stent graft at the midportion which after ballooning disrupts the dissection membrane and opposes the outer wall and therefore occludes backflow into the aneurysm sac in the thoracic segment, but the most convenient

and easy to use tool is the candy-plug which is a double tapered endograft with a midsegment that is 18 mm and once implanted in the false lumen at the level of the supraceliac aorta it occludes the backflow in the false lumen in the thoracic aorta

and we have seen very good remodeling with this approach. You see here a patient who completely regressed over three years and it also answers the question how it behaves with respect to true and false lumen. The true lumen always wins and because once

the false lumen thrombosis and the true lumen also has the arterial pressure it does prevail. These are the results from Hamburg with an experience of 33 patients and also the international experience with the CMD device that has been implanted in more than 20 cases worldwide

and we can see that the interprocedural technical success is extremely high, 100% with no irrelevant complications and also a complete false lumen that is very high, up to 95%. This is the evolvement of the candy-plug

over the years. It started as a surgeon modified graft just making a tie around one of the stents evolving to a CMD and then the last generation candy-plug II that came up 2017 and the difference, or the new aspect

of the candy-plug II is that it has a sleeve inside and therefore you can retrieve the dilator without having to put another central occluder or a plug in the central portion. Therefore when the dilator is outside of the sleeve the backflow occludes the sleeve

and you don't have to do anything else, but you have to be careful not to dislodge the whole stent graft while retrieving the dilator. This is a case of a patient with post (mumbles) dissection.

This is the technique of how we do it, access to the false lumen and deployment of the stent graft in the false lumen next to the true lumen stent graft being conscious of the fact that you don't go below the edge of the true lumen endograft

to avoid (mumbles) and the final angiography showing no backflow in the aneurysm. This is how we measure and it's quite simple. You just need about a centimeter in the supraceliac aorta where it's not massively dilated and then you just do an over-sizing

in the false lumen according to the Croissant technique as Ste-phan He-lo-sa has described by 10 to 30% and what is very important is that in these cases you don't burn any bridges. You can still have a good treatment

of the thoracic component and come back and do the fenestrated branch repair for the thoracoabdominal aorta if you have to. Thank you very much for your attention. (applause)

- Thank you. I have a little disclosure. I've got to give some, or rather, quickly point out the technique. First apply the stet graph as close as possible to the hypogastric artery.

As you can see here, the end of distal graft. Next step, come from the left brachial you can lay the catheter in the hypogastric artery. And then come from both

as you can see here, with this verge catheter and you put in position the culver stent, and from the femoral you just put in position the iliac limb orthostatic graft.

The next step, apply the stent graft, the iliac limb stent graft, keep the viabahn and deployed it in more the part here. What you have here is five centimeter overlap to avoid Type I endoleak.

The next step, use a latex balloon, track over to the iliac limb, and keep until the, as you can see here, the viabahn is still undeployed. In the end of the procedure,

at least one and a half centimeters on both the iliac lumen to avoid occlusion to viabahn. So we're going to talk about our ten years since I first did my first description of this technique. We do have the inclusion criteria

that's very important to see that I can't use the Sandwich Technique with iliac lumen unless they are bigger than eight millimeters. That's one advantage of this technique. I can't use also in the very small length

of common iliac artery and external iliac artery and I need at least four millimeters of the hypogastric artery. The majority patients are 73 age years old. Majority males. Hypertension, a lot of comorbidity of oldest patients.

But the more important, here you can see, when you compare the groups with the high iliac artery and aneurismal diameter and treat with the Sandwich Technique, you can see here actually it's statistically significant

that I can treat patient with a very small real lumen regarding they has in total diameter bigger size but I can treat with very small lumen. That's one of the advantages of this technique. You can see the right side and also in the left side. So all situations, I can treat very small lumen

of the aneurysm. The next step so you can show here is about we performed this on 151 patients. Forty of these patients was bilateral. That's my approach of that. And you can see, the procedure time,

the fluoroscope time is higher in the group that I performed bilaterally. And the contrast volume tends to be more in the bilateral group. But ICU stay, length of stay, and follow up is no different between these two groups.

The technical success are 96.7%. Early mortality only in three patients, one patient. Late mortality in 8.51 patients. Only one was related with AMI. Reintervention rate is 5, almost 5.7 percent. Buttock claudication rate is very, very rare.

You cannot find this when you do Sandwich Technique bilaterally. And about the endoleaks, I have almost 18.5% of endoleaks. The majority of them was Type II endoleaks. I have some Type late endoleaks

also the majority of them was Type II endoleaks. And about the other complications I will just remark that I do not have any neurological complications because I came from the left brachial. And as well I do not have colon ischemia

and spinal cord ischemia rate. And all about the evolution of the aneurysm sac. You'll see the majority, almost two-thirds have degrees of the aneurysm sac diameter. And some of these patients

we get some degrees but basically still have some Type II endoleak. That's another very interesting point of view. So you can see here, pre and post, decrease of the aneurysm sac.

You see the common iliac artery pre and post decreasing and the hypogastric also decreasing. So in conclusion, the Sandwich Technique facilitates safe and effective aneurysm exclusion

and target vessel revascularization in adverse anatomical scenarios with sustained durability in midterm follow-up. Thank you very much for attention.

- Thank you, Doctor Chuter. So, as you saw in Eric's presentation, really indwelling catheters and wires have become more or less routine for us. And they're nothing new to this era of complex and vascular repair. We've seen them a long time and

we started using them, of course, for iliac branch devices, as you can see here. And the concept is the same when you use them for other branches or fenestrations, as I'll show you. And here, an iliac branch is coming over with that indwelling catheter and snaring

from the contralateral end to be able to get that sheath. This is a helical-helical device, so putting that sheath over to get access to the contralateral side. So why and when do we need preloaded grafts with wires or catheters for complex aortic repair? Well, sometimes we have access issues

and it alleviates that, as I'll show you. Having the fenestrations or branches pre-catheterized will intuitively reduce X-ray exposure times and operating times, and also help catheterization in difficult anatomy, as Eric alluded to, and thereby

keeping the procedure down and avoiding large sheaths in both groins, at the same time minimizing lower-extremity ischemia time. This is an example of putting a fenestrated device in a previous infrarenal device. And the multitude of markers here

makes it very difficult to actually locate the fenestrations on the new graft, so it's very advantageous in these settings to have the fenestrations preloaded. This was first described by Krassi Ivancev back in 2010, and this is the original

preloaded design for a juxtarenal fenestrated device. And you can see a loop wire going through the top of that device. And a very simple handle with a couple of wires and things coming out of it, and some technical difficulties with wire catches

and other things made us move away from that design. It was later evolved into this bi-port delivery system, which allows you to have access to two fenestrations from a unilateral approach with indwelling renal wires and then sheaths, and having

those wires go through the renal fenestrations. And this evolved into the p-branch off-the-shelf fenestrated device from Cook, as you can see here. And you can see that loop wire coming out through that right renal fenestration

going through the top of the graft. And this is the catheter just describing how you then can use a double-puncture technique to access that renal artery and place the sheath there. The advantages of the technique

was described by Doctor Torsello's group in Munster here, showing that it does in fact reduce the amount of radiation in contrast during these procedures as well as bringing the procedure time down. And this was described by Mark Farber as well

in the experience of the off-the-shelf p-branch devices. We modified the preloaded device a little bit further by taking away that very top stent, and instead of having the loop wire is on the p-branch, just placing catheters through those fenestrations,

but still using the triport handle, and then replacing those with 018 wires to achieve stable positions. Of course, preloaded catheters and wires can then be used for branch procedures as well, as Eric Verhoeven just showed you. And in this case, just using these

indwelling catheters to allowing wires to be snared from above and then advanced into the specific branches and distal arteries. And of course, if you use a fenestrated device for thoraco-abdominal repair, the same applies. And this is from Carlos Timaran's paper

just showing how he places these wires from above in these discrete fenestrations. This is a combined device of a two-branch, two-fen device, if you would like, that has indwelling wires going through the fenestrations and out

through the branches, which we use on occasion. You can then bring that out through the axillary artery, and you get access directly from above to the branches from below for the fenestrations. And we found it very useful in the setting of narrow aortic

lumens and chronic aortic dissections, as in this case. And you can see here, then, on the wires placing the sheath, catheterizing the renals, and then at the same time, having these access catheters in the branches so you don't have to access those for a nice end result.

So in summary, Chairman, ladies and gentlemen, preloaded wire I think reduces the operative time and the X-ray exposure during these procedures. It's very useful, particularly in complex torturous aortas, during redo EVAR cases with preexisting devices, and

compromised iliac access, and in the situations of narrow aortas, like in chronic aortic dissections. Thank you very much.

- Relevant disclosures are shown in this slide. So when we treat patients with Multi-Segment Disease, the more segments that are involved, the more complex the outcomes that we should expect, with regards to the patient comorbidities and the complexity of the operation. And this is made even more complex

when we add aortic dissection to the patient population. We know that a large proportion of patients who undergo Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair, require planned coverage of the left subclavian artery. And this also been demonstrated that it's an increase risk for stroke, spinal cord ischemia and other complications.

What are the options when we have to cover the left subclavian artery? Well we can just cover the artery, we no that. That's commonly performed in emergency situations. The current standard is to bypass or transpose the artery. Or provide a totally endovascular revascularization option

with some off-label use , such as In Situ or In Vitro Fenestration, Parallel Grafting or hopefully soon we will see and will have available branched graft devices. These devices are currently investigational and the focus today's talk will be this one,

the Valiant Mona Lisa Stent Graft System. Currently the main body device is available in diameters between thirty and forty-six millimeters and they are all fifteen centimeters long. The device is designed with flexible cuff, which mimics what we call the "volcano" on the main body.

It's a pivotal connection. And it's a two wire pre-loaded system with a main system wire and a wire through the left subclavian artery branch. And this has predominately been delivered with a through and through wire of

that left subclavian branch. The system is based on the valiant device with tip capture. The left subclavian artery branch is also unique to this system. It's a nitinol helical stent, with polyester fabric. It has a proximal flare,

which allows fixation in that volcano cone. Comes in three diameters and they're all the same length, forty millimeters, with a fifteen french profile. The delivery system, which is delivered from the groin, same access point as the main body device. We did complete the early feasibility study

with nine subjects at three sites. The goals were to validate the procedure, assess safety, and collect imaging data. We did publish that a couple of years ago. Here's a case demonstration. This was a sixty-nine year old female

with a descending thoracic aneurysm at five and a half centimeters. The patient's anatomy met the criteria. We selected a thirty-four millimeter diameter device, with a twelve millimeter branch. And we chose to extend this repair down to the celiac artery

in this patient. The pre-operative CT scan looks like this. The aneurysm looks bigger with thrombus in it of course, but that was the device we got around the corner of that arch to get our seal. Access is obtained both from the groin

and from the arm as is common with many TEVAR procedures. Here we have the device up in the aorta. There's our access from the arm. We had a separate puncture for a "pigtail". Once the device is in position, we "snare" the wire, we confirm that we don't have

any "wire wrap". You can see we went into a areal position to doubly confirm that. And then the device is expanded, and as it's on sheath, it does creep forward a bit. And we have capture with that through and through wire

and tension on that through and through wire, while we expand the rest of the device. And you can see that the volcano is aligned right underneath the left subclavian artery. There's markers there where there's two rings, the outer and the inner ring of that volcano.

Once the device is deployed with that through and through wire access, we deliver the branch into the left subclavian artery. This is a slow deployment, so that we align the flair within the volcano and that volcano is flexible. In some patients, it sort of sits right at the level of

the aorta, like you see in this patient. Sometimes it protrudes. It doesn't really matter, as long as the two things are mated together. There is some flexibility built in the system. In this particular patient,

we had a little leak, so we were able to balloon this as we would any others. For a TEVAR, we just balloon both devices at the same time. Completion Angiogram shown here and we had an excellent result with this patient at six months and at a year the aneurysm continued

to re-sorb. In that series, we had successful delivery and deployment of all the devices. The duration of the procedure has improved with time. Several of these patients required an extension. We are in the feasibility phase.

We've added additional centers and we continue to enroll patients. And one of the things that we've learned is that details about the association between branches and the disease are critical. And patient selection is critical.

And we will continue to complete enrollment for the feasibility and hopefully we will see the pivotal studies start soon. Thank you very much

- So Beyond Vascular procedures, I guess we've conquered all the vascular procedures, now we're going to conquer the world, so let me take a little bit of time to say that these are my conflicts, while doing that, I think it's important that we encourage people to access the hybrid rooms,

It's much more important that the tar-verse done in the Hybrid Room, rather than moving on to the CAT labs, so we have some idea basically of what's going on. That certainly compresses the Hybrid Room availability, but you can't argue for more resources

if the Hybrid Room is running half-empty for example, the only way you get it is by opening this up and so things like laser lead extractions or tar-verse are predominantly still done basically in our hybrid rooms, and we try to make access for them. I don't need to go through this,

you've now think that Doctor Shirttail made a convincing argument for 3D imaging and 3D acquisition. I think the fundamental next revolution in surgery, Every subspecialty is the availability of 3D imaging in the operating room.

We have lead the way in that in vascular surgery, but you think how this could revolutionize urology, general surgery, neurosurgery, and so I think it's very important that we battle for imaging control. Don't give your administration the idea that

you're going to settle for a C-arm, that's the beginning of the end if you do that, this okay to augment use C-arms to augment your practice, but if you're a finishing fellow, you make sure you go to a place that's going to give you access to full hybrid room,

otherwise, you are the subservient imagers compared to radiologists and cardiologists. We need that access to this high quality room. And the new buzzword you're going to hear about is Multi Modality Imaging Suites, this combination of imaging suites that are

being put together, top left deserves with MR, we think MR is the cardiovascular imaging modality of the future, there's a whole group at NIH working at MR Guided Interventions which we're interested in, and the bottom right is the CT-scan in a hybrid op

in a hybrid room, this is actually from MD Anderson. And I think this is actually the Trauma Room of the future, makes no sense to me to take a patient from an emergency room to a CT scanner to an and-jure suite to an operator it's the most dangerous thing we do

with a trauma patient and I think this is actually a position statement from the Trauma Society we're involved in, talk about how important it is to co-localize this imaging, and I think the trauma room of the future is going to be an and-jure suite

down with a CT scanner built into it, and you need to be flexible. Now, the Empire Strikes Back in terms of cloud-based fusion in that Siemans actually just released a portable C-arm that does cone-beam CT. C-arm's basically a rapidly improving,

and I think a lot of these things are going to be available to you at reduced cost. So let me move on and basically just show a couple of examples. What you learn are techniques, then what you do is look for applications to apply this, and so we've been doing

translumbar embolization using fusion and imaging guidance, and this is a case of one of my partners, he'd done an ascending repair, and the patient came back three weeks later and said he had sudden-onset chest pain and the CT-scan showed that there was a

sutured line dehiscence which is a little alarming. I tried to embolize that endovascular, could not get to that tiny little orifice, and so we decided to watch it, it got worse, and bigger, over the course of a week, so clearly we had to go ahead and basically and fix this,

and we opted to use this, using a new guidance system and going directly parasternal. You can do fusion of blood vessels or bones, you can do it off anything you can see on flu-roid, here we actually fused off the sternal wires and this allows you to see if there's

respiratory motion, you can measure in the workstation the depth really to the target was almost four and a half centimeters straight back from the second sternal wire and that allowed us really using this image guidance system when you set up what's called the bullseye view,

you look straight down the barrel of a needle, and then the laser turns on and the undersurface of the hybrid room shows you where to stick the needle. This is something that we'd refined from doing localization of lung nodules

and I'll show you that next. And so this is the system using the C-star, we use the breast, and the localization needle, and we can actually basically advance that straight into that cavity, and you can see once you get in it,

we confirmed it by injecting into it, you can see the pseudo-aneurism, you can see the immediate stain of hematoma and then we simply embolize that directly. This is probably safer than going endovascular because that little neck protects about

the embolization from actually taking place, and you can see what the complete snan-ja-gram actually looked like, we had a pig tail in the aura so we could co-linearly check what was going on and we used docto-gramming make sure we don't have embolization.

This patient now basically about three months follow-up and this is a nice way to completely dissolve by avoiding really doing this. Let me give you another example, this actually one came from our transplant surgeon he wanted to put in a vas,

he said this patient is really sick, so well, by definition they're usually pretty sick, they say we need to make a small incision and target this and so what we did was we scanned the vas, that's the hardware device you're looking at here. These have to be

oriented with the inlet nozzle looking directly into the orifice of the mitro wall, and so we scanned the heart with, what you see is what you get with these devices, they're not deformed, we take a cell phone and implant it in your chest,

still going to look like a cell phone. And so what we did, image fusion was then used with two completely different data sets, it mimicking the procedure, and we lined this up basically with a mitro valve, we then used that same imaging guidance system

I was showing you, made a little incision really doing onto the apex of the heart, and to the eur-aph for the return cannula, and this is basically what it looked like, and you can actually check the efficacy of this by scanning the patient post operatively

and see whether or not you executed on this basically the same way, and so this was all basically developed basing off Lung Nodule Localization Techniques with that we've kind of fairly extensively published, use with men can base one of our thoracic surgeons

so I'd encourage you to look at other opportunities by which you can help other specialties, 'cause I think this 3D imaging is going to transform what our capabilities actually are. Thank you very much indeed for your attention.

- Good morning, thank you very much to Dr. Veith and Professor Veith and the organizers. So this is real holography. It's not augmented reality. It's not getting you separated from the environment that you're in. This is actually taking the 3D out of the screen

so the beating heart can be held in the palm of your hand without you having to wear any goggles or anything else and this is live imaging. It can be done intra-procedure. This is the Holoscope-i and the other one is the Holoscope-x

where in fact you can take that actually 3D hologram that you have and you can implant it in the patient and if you co-register it correctly then you can actually do the intervention in the patient

make a needle tract to the holographic needle and I'm going to limit this to just now what we're actually doing at the moment and not necessarily what the future can be. This is ultimate 3D visualization, true volumes floating in the air.

This is a CT scan. So it started working, So we get rid of the auto-segmented and you can just interact. It's floating 45 centimeters away from you and you can just hold the patient's anatomy here and you can slice into the anatomy.

This is for instance a real CT of an aorta with the aortic valve which they wanted to analyze for a core valve procedure. This is done by Phelps. If you take the information

and they've looked at the final element analysis and interaction between the stem and the tissue. So here you can make measurements in real time. So if you did the 3D rotation and geography and you had the aorta and you wanted to put in a stent graft EVAR TVAR, and you would see,

and you could put in a typical tuber that you would do, and you could see how it, and this is a dynamic hologram, so you can see how it would open up, you can mark where your fenestration's chimney is and all that type of stuff would be. And you can move it around, and you have

a complete intuitive understanding of a, can we go to the next slide please, I can't, it seems to be clicking, thank you. So how do we do all this? Well, to create a hologram, what you need to do is just conceptualize it as printing in light.

Like if you had plastic and you took the XYZ data and you just put it into a 3D printer, and it would print it for you in light, then you'd go, Okay, so I understand, if it was printed for you in plastic then you'd understand. But imagine it's printing in light.

So we have every single piece of light focused, each photon is focused so that you can see it with a naked eye, in a particular place, but the difference is that it's totally sterile, you don't have to take off your gloves, you don't have to use a mouse,

you can interact with it directly. And all the XYZ data is 100% in place, so we've just seen a beautiful demonstration of augmented reality, and in augmented reality, you have to wear something, it isolates you from the environment that you're in, and it's based on

stereoscopy, and stereoscopy is how you see 3D movies, and how you see augmented reality, is by taking two images and fusing them in one focal plane. But you can't touch that image, because if you look at me now, you can see me very well, but if you hold your finger up 45 centimeters

and you focus on your finger, I become blurred. And so, you can only focus in one plane, you can't touch that image, because that image is distant from you, and it's a fused image, so you have the focus plane and you have the convergence plane, and this is an illusion

of 3D, and it's very entertaining, and it can be very useful in medical imaging, but in intra-operative procedures it has to be 100% accurate. So you saw a very beautiful example in the previous talk of augmented reality, where you have gesturing, where you can actually gesture with the image,

you can make it bigger, you can make it smaller. But what RealView does by creating real holography, which is all the XYZ data, is having it in the palm of your hand, with having above 20 focal planes, here, very very close to your eye, and that in another way, of having all those focal planes not only actually lets you

do the procedure but prevents nausea and having a feeling of discomfort because the image is actually there as of having the illusion of the images there. So just to go back, all RealView imaging is doing, is it's not changing your 3D RA cone, BMCT, MRI,

we can do all those XYZ datas and we can use them and we can present them, all we're doing, so you use your acquisition, we're just taking that, and we're breaking open the 3D displays and seeing all that 3D data limited in the 2D screen, let's set it free and have it floating in the air.

So we have the holoscope-i for structural cardiology and electrophysiology, and obviously the holoscope-x, which makes the patient x-rayed, completely visible. So its an over the head, this is now, obviously, free-standing when somebody buys us like Phillips or Siemens, it will be integrated into your lab,

come down from the ceiling, it's an independent system, and you just have a visor that you look through, which just goes up and down whenever you want to use it. You can interact with it the same as you do with your iPhone you can visualize, you can rotate, you can mark, you can slice, you can measure, as I showed you

some examples of it, and you can do this by voice as well, you just talk to it, you say slice and you slice it with your hand, it recognizes everybody's hand, there's no delay for whatever you're imaging. So structural cardiac procedures, this is what

a mitral valve will look like, floating in the air in front of you, you can see the anterior leaflet, the posterior leaflet. And once the catheter is inside and you're guiding the catheter inside the procedure, you can turn on your doppler, you'll be able to see that the catheter

movements, so for someone doing a mitral clip, or whatever, this would be very very useful. This is an electrophysiological procedure, and you can see how the catheter moves, when the catheter will move, and obviously, as my previous speaker was saying, you are appreciating 3D in a 2D screen,

so it's very difficult to appreciate, you'll have to take my word for it. But I think you can see dynamic colography at this quality, that you can interact with, that is something that is very special, we've presented at a number of conferences,

including at Veith, and we've already done a first in man, and the most exciting thing for now, is just this week, the first machine was installed at Toronto general, at the Peter Munk Cardiac Center, and they've done their first case, and so now we are launching and clinical trials in 2018, and hopefully,

I'll have something which is more vascular relevant, at the next time, Veith 2019, thank you very much.

- Thank you Dr. Albaramum, it's a real pleasure to be here and I thank you for being here this early. I have no disclosures. So when everything else fails, we need to convert to open surgery, most of the times this leads to partial endograft removal,

complete removal clearly for infection, and then proximal control and distal control, which is typical in vascular surgery. Here's a 73 year old patient who two years after EVAR had an aneurism growth with what was thought

to be a type II endoleak, had coiling of the infermius mesenteric artery, but the aneurism continued to grow. So he was converted and what we find here is a type III endoleak from sutures in the endograft.

So, this patient had explantations, so it is my preference to have the nordic control with an endovascular technique through the graft where the graft gets punctured and then we put a 16 French Sheath, then we can put a aortic balloon.

And this avoids having to dissect the suprarenal aorta, particularly in devices that have super renal fixation. You can use a fogarty balloon or you can use the pruitt ballon, the advantage of the pruitt balloon is that it's over the wire.

So here's where we removed the device and in spite of the fact that we tried to collapse the super renal stent, you end up with an aortic endarterectomy and a renal endarterectomy which is not a desirable situation.

So, in this instance, it's not what we intend to do is we cut the super renal stent with wire cutters and then removed the struts individually. Here's the completion and preservation of iliac limbs, it's pretty much the norm in all of these cases,

unless they have, they're not well incorporated, it's a lot easier. It's not easy to control these iliac arteries from the inflammatory process that follows the placement of the endograft.

So here's another case where we think we're dealing with a type II endoleak, we do whatever it does for a type II endoleak and you can see here this is a pretty significant endoleak with enlargement of the aneurism.

So this patient gets converted and what's interesting is again, you see a suture hole, and in this case what we did is we just closed the suture hole, 'cause in my mind,

it would be simple to try and realign that graft if the endoleak persisted or recurred, as opposed to trying to remove the entire device. Here's the follow up on that patient, and this patient has remained without an endoleak, and the aneurism we resected

part of the sack, and the aneurism has remained collapsed. So here's another patient who's four years status post EVAR, two years after IMA coiling and what's interesting is when you do delayed,

because the aneurism sacks started to increase, we did delayed use and you see this blush here, and in this cases we know before converting the patient we would reline the graft thinking, that if it's a type III endoleak we can resolve it that way

otherwise then the patient would need conversion. So, how do we avoid the proximal aortic endarterectomy? We'll leave part of the proximal portion of the graft, you can transect the graft. A lot of these grafts can be clamped together with the aorta

and then you do a single anastomosis incorporating the graft and the aorta for the proximal anastomosis. Now here's a patient, 87 years old, had an EVAR,

the aneurism grew from 6 cm to 8.8 cm, he had coil embolization, translumbar injection of glue, we re-lined the endograft and the aneurism kept enlarging. So basically what we find here is a very large type II endoleak,

we actually just clip the vessel and then resected the sack and closed it, did not remove the device. So sometimes you can just preserve the entire device and just take care of the endoleak. Now when we have infection,

then we have to remove the entire device, and one alternative is to use extra-anatomic revascularization. Our preference however is to use cryo-preserved homograft with wide debridement of the infected area. These grafts are relatively easy to remove,

'cause they're not incorporated. On the proximal side you can see that there's a aortic clamp ready to go here, and then we're going to slide it out while we clamp the graft immediately, clamp the aorta immediately after removal.

And here's the reconstruction. Excuse me. For an endograft-duodenal fistula here's a patient that has typical findings, then on endoscopy you can see a little bit of the endograft, and then on an opergy I series

you actually see extravasation from the duodenal. In this case we have the aorta ready to be clamped, you can see the umbilical tape here, and then take down the fistula, and then once the fistula's down

you got to repair the duodenal with an omental patch, and then a cryopreserved reconstruction. Here's a TEVAR conversion, a patient with a contained ruptured mycotic aneurysm, we put an endovascular graft initially, Now in this patient we do the soraconomy

and the other thing we do is, we do circulatory support. I prefer to use ECMO, in this instances we put a very long canula into the right atrium, which you're anesthesiologist can confirm

with transassof forgeoligico. And then we use ECMO for circulatory support. The other thing we're doing now is we're putting antibiotic beads, with specific antibiotic's for the organism that has been cultured.

Here's another case where a very long endograft was removed and in this case, we put the device offline, away from the infected field and then we filled the field with antibiotic beads. So we've done 47 conversions,

12 of them were acute, 35 were chronic, and what's important is the mortality for acute conversion is significant. And at this point the, we avoid acute conversions,

most of those were in the early experience. Thank you.

- Thank you very much for having me speak and thank you for coming this late in the day for this talk. These are my disclosures. This is our current operating system with advanced imaging and this is GE Discovery IGS 740. You can see you have fusion imaging,

you have the capacity to use combined CT. What I would like to talk to you today is about how we were significantly decrease radiation over the years. What you are seeing on this graph is my personal volume of endovascular cases. In the solid bullets you've the number of fenestrated cases

which have steadily increased over the years and in the empty rounds you've the number of any endovascular case. So what this is saying is that I am doing more fenestrated than more standard endovascular cases. And nowadays these cases are becoming more complex.

You're seeing here the number of vessels incorporated went from 2.9 all the way to 3.7 per patient. Now, at the same time, I did get better over the years. You can see that the fluoroscopy time for the procedures declined after two or three years of experience but it plateaued in 2012.

So, basically, since 2012, I am not doing these cases any faster with any last fluoroscopy time. So any change in the operator or in the patient radiation exposure would be attributed to other factors but the technique. You can see here the effective dose over the years

has dramatically declined from system 1 to system 2 to now system 3 in the blue that is the GE Discovery system to approximately 1/3rd to 1/4th of our baseline dose in the first beginning of the experience. We also recorded the operator dose over the year and you can see here that my radiation dose

has significantly declined again to about 1/3rd to 1/4th of the beginning of the experience. So, how did we achieve this improvement? I will go for eight golden rules, first is doing your work ahead of time, finding out the ideal work positions, using and leveraging all preoperative cross-sectional

imaging that you've, numerous of speakers have already talked about that, our highlights the importance of lead shooting with the work of Dijon which has a thing being remarkable contribution to the understanding of this. Optimize the system geometry, I think is very important avoiding work with the detector too high, the table low

as the abstracted on these illustration or the opposite with the table too high and really finding your way to the optimal geometry. I am sorry I advanceed, the slide is wrong way. Using the ideal dose rate, you can see here that the ideal dose rate in most operators has been down

now to 7.5 frames per second, and in some systems even 3.75 frames per second. We tend to use 7.5, we found this to be the soft spot with our system. ONLAY fusion has been also an important aspect in terms of facilitating the procedure, you're seeing

a segment of a patient before chronic dissection where you're leveraging the fusion to find the septum of trolloming using a reentrance device and really minimizing the amount of contrast and minimizing fluoroscopy, finding your ideal work position or with the use of these landmark markings

than with the fusion. Finally, nice feature of the system is the digital zoom. We really rarely magnify. What you're seeing here is a basically, digitally zoom different than magnification, so that really has allowed us to keep the dose very low

coupled with the collimation. And I think, this is a nice feature. We really avoid using DSAs unless you've to interrogate vessel. It is important to remember that 1 DSA is equivalent to approximately 500 fluoroscopic look.

So, what you're seeing here is the interrogation of a left renal stent done with a fluoroscopic loop as opposed to DSA. And, that is again a very important aspect. Avoiding high angulations wave when you're working in the sma or the celiac axis, we actually tend to that often

with the AP as opposed to the lateral view as soon as you can, you kind of transfer the image to the AP view to minimize radiation. So, in summary, we came a long ways, in terms of standard and complex EVAR where living now in a narrate that we've better devices, we've cross sectional imaging and we've

advanced image and I think we need to leverage all these three aspects to minimize radiation. Thank you very much

- Again, I think I'm going to continue the theme here on talking about REBOA technologies and techniques, so thank you, Dr. Veith, again for allowing us this format. No disclosures on my part. Everyone by now has heard this term multiple times and I think this is a community that understands

Resuscitative Endovascular Balloon Occulsion of the Aorta. Not new technology, very familiar to everyone in this audience who frequently is called upon to deal with the ultimate model of noncompressible hemorrhage,

that of the rupturing abdominal aortic aneurysm. Dr. Veith showed us many years ago that we could get appreciable outcomes improvement with endovascular balloon occlusions here, and the military was certainly listening. Colonel Rasmussen developed this paper

describing the first techniques. The diagram on your left, one of our first civilian centers, in a classic military-civilian collaboration, that we rolled this out at at Shock Trauma, this is the algorithm that is utilized there and it has been exported to countless trauma centers

for incorporation into their own protocols. And, as it was also mentioned, the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma AORTA Registry is capturing these prospectively. We now have 34 centers and over 568 REBOAs captured as of November 2018.

And this hopefully will continue to provide us some of the data that we need to better differentiate optimal patient selection and optimal practices. So, again, another encouraging anyone in the audience to likewise contribute to those 34 centers. And we have evolving advances in technology, clearly,

some of that has been discussed about here already. And better understanding through the Endovascular Resuscitation Trauma Management Society, and other meetings like that, to look at procedural approaches that work and share knowledge across the full spectrum.

We have lower profile devices. We have the ability to monitor the patients to step up care in a stepwise fashion to optimize the survival of bleeding patients. The old Coda balloon we initially utilized for this approach for REBOA back when I started doing this in about 2008 was,

or 2009, was has largely been replaced by these military specific civilian and trauma specific technologies that Colonel Rasmussen mentioned briefly. The REBOA in 2018, the majority of centers coming on board from the trauma center perspective or utilizing the prime time ER REBOA catheter,

this is FDA approved for floroscopic, for use. It is 7 French compatible, has a distal arterial pressure monitoring port distal to the balloon, does not require a guide wire, and is exceedingly user-friendly for the majority of the people who are going to be putting these in,

which is the acute care trauma surgeon who's at bedside when these patients arrive. The techniques that we utilize and we teach in our American College of Surgeons Basic Endovascular Skills for Trauma course, our best course, which is our current standard for training of REBOA

to trauma and acute care providers and, increasingly a larger subset of providers, utilizes external landmarks. And this has been shown through both CT morphometric studies and clinical applications to be a very reliable modality in that patient who is actively

attempting to code in front of you. And Colonel Rasmussen also touched on our growing experience here. The Northern paper was really a banner presentation and an eye-opening report for we, as military providers, and the trauma community, with their 100 percent

survival to the next echelon of care. We've learned a lot from these groups and their ability to employ this device effectively in really a resource-limited environment where they don't have blood providers become a resource that is very limited.

It's a challenging environment and they were able to deploy this quite effectively. And, more recently, the Tactical Combat Casualty Care committee has released guidelines for utilizations technology across a wider spectrum of small, not just surgical teams,

but also resuscitative teams. These are some of the pictures of some of the crews that I deployed with recently. And we are small team living out of a backpack with very limited blood utilization. And having this capability in your backpack,

to get that patient to more of a hard stand definitive surgical facility is a game-changer for all of these types of providers put in these situations across huge geographic footprints including Africa and parts of the Middle East.

Refinement of techniques is also continuing to evolve. Tal Horer talked briefly about partial REBOLA, this is how I utilize this technology. In a more refined fashion, utilizing a manual compression of the balloon to titrate a blood pressure that keeps the heart and the brain happy

with normal tension and keeps the operative field until definitive surgical control's obtained in hypotensive resuscitation state. So we're not disrupting clot, we're not causing more bleeding and propagating the deadly triad with ongoing cuagulopathy.

It's a wonderful tool, wonderful approach, I think. This is how it works. To some degree you can see the surgeon, the REBOA catheter in place, that was placed before the abdomen was opened. The surgeon actively working to obtain definitive control.

And we have here the balloon, the pressure in the balloon, the monitoring port above the balloon. This is the pressure below the balloon, as measured off the side port of the 7 French sheath. So now I'm able to titrate a pressure that minimizes the risk of hypotension

for the brain, the heart, those critical organs, yet perfuses the distal organs to a safe degree so that we don't have that reperfusion payback after subsequent definitive surgical control's obtained. And this technology continues to grow across a wide spectrum of indications,

non-trauma hemorrhage indications. When you look at global health burden, post-partum hemorrhage is more likely, in 10 years, to benefit from the further integration of REBOA, than any trauma bleeding that we encounter. That's really just a huge global health burden

and there's an active community in both the U.S. and South America developing registries for implementation there and partnerships across multiple specialties. And there's now actually an NIH funded, clinical research project in development

to look at the use of these balloons in CPR, those patients in Vfib that are not refractory to electroshock, and to see if we can salvage some of those patients. So that is also in effect. Some conclusions, REBOA continues to evolve

for applications for trauma and has evolving opportunities, as well, in non-trauma areas and wider utilization is going to continue to be facilitated by continued device improvements, training and research. Thank you.

- This talk is a brief one about what I think is an entity that we need to be aware of because we see some. They're not AVMs obviously, they're acquired, but it nevertheless represents an entity which we've seen. We know the transvenous treatment of AVMs is a major advance in safety and efficacy.

And we know that the venous approach is indeed very, very favorable. This talk relates to some lesions, which we are successful in treating as a venous approach, but ultimately proved to be,

as I will show you in considerable experience now, I think that venous thrombosis and venous inflammatory disease result in acquired arteriovenous connections, we call them AVMs, but they're not. This patient, for example,

presented with extensive lower extremity swelling after an episode of DVT. And you can see the shunting there in the left lower extremity. Here we go in a later arterial phase. This lesion we found,

as others, is best treated. By the way, that was his original episode of DVT with occlusion. Was treated with stenting and restoration of flow and the elimination of the AVM.

So, compression of the lesion in the venous wall, which is actually interesting because in the type perivenous predominant lesions, those are actually lesions in the vein wall. So these in a form, or in a way, assimilate the AVMs that occur in the venous wall.

Another man, a 53-year-old gentleman with leg swelling after an episode of DVT, we can see the extensive filling via these collaterals, and these are inflammatory collaterals in the vein wall. This is another man with a prior episode of DVT. See his extensive anterior pelvic collaterals,

and he was treated with stenting and success. A recent case, that Dr. Resnick and I had, I was called with a gentleman said he had an AVM. And we can see that the arteriogram sent to me showed arterial venous shunting.

Well, what was interesting here was that the history had not been obtained of a prior total knee replacement. And he gave a very clear an unequivocal history of a DVT of sudden onset. And you can see the collaterals there

in the adjacent femoral popliteal vein. And there it is filling. So treatment here was venous stenting of the lesion and of the underlying stenosis. We tried an episode of angioplasty,

but ultimately successful. Swelling went down and so what you have is really a post-inflammatory DVT. Our other vast experience, I would say, are the so-called uterine AVMs. These are referred to as AVMs,

but these are clearly understood to be acquired, related to placental persistence and the connections between artery and veins in the uterus, which occurs, a part of normal pregnancy. These are best treated either with arterial embolization, which has been less successful,

but in some cases, with venous injection in venous thrombosis with coils or alcohol. There's a subset I believe of some of our pelvic AVMs, that have histories of DVT. I believe they're silent. I think the consistency of this lesion

that I'm showing you here, that if we all know, can be treated by coil embolization indicates to me that at least some, especially in patients in advanced stage are related to DVT. This is a 56-year-old, who had a known history of prostate cancer

and post-operative DVT and a very classic looking AVM, which we then treated with coil embolization. And we're able to cure, but no question in my mind at least based on the history and on the age, that this was post-phlebitic.

And I think some of these, and I think Wayne would agree with me, some of these are probably silent internal iliac venous thromboses, which we know can occur, which we know can produce pulmonary embolism.

And that's the curative final arteriogram. Other lesions such as this, I believe are related, at least some, although we don't have an antecedent history to the development of DVT, and again of course,

treated by the venous approach with cure. And then finally, some of the more problematic ones, another 56-year-old man with a history of prior iliofemoral DVT. Suddenly was fine, had been treated with heparin and anticoagulation.

And suddenly appeared with rapid onset of right lower extremity swelling and pain. So you see here that on an arteriogram of the right femoral, as well as, the super selective catheterization of some of these collaterals.

We can see the lesion itself. I think it's a nice demonstration of lesion. Under any other circumstance, this is an AVM. It is an AVM, but we know it to be acquired because he had no such swelling. This was treated in the only way I knew how to treat

with stenting of the vein. We placed a stent. That's a ballon expanded in the angiogram on your right is after with ballon inflation. And you can see the effect that the stenting pressure, and therefore subsequently occlusion of the compression,

and occlusion of the collaterals, and connections in the vein wall. He subsequently became asymptomatic. We had unfortunately had to stent extensively in the common femoral vein but he had an excellent result.

So I think pelvic AVMs are very similar in location and appearance. We've had 13 cases. Some with a positive history of DVT. I believe many are acquired post-DVT, and the treatment is the same venous coiling and or stent.

Wayne has seen some that are remarkable. Remember Wayne we saw at your place? A guy was in massive heart failure and clearly a DVT-related. So these are some of the cases we've seen

and I think it's noteworthy to keep in mind, that we still don't know everything there is to know about AVMs. Some AVMs are acquired, for example, pelvic post-DVT, and of course all uterine AVMs. Thanks very much.

(audience applause) - [Narrator] That's a very interesting hypothesis with a pelvic AVMs which are consistently looking similar. - [Robert] In the same place right? - [Narrator] All of them are appearing at an older age. - [Robert] Yep.

Yep. - This would be a very, very good explanation for that. I've never thought about that. - Yeah I think-- - I think this is very interesting. - [Robert] And remember, exactly.

And I remember that internal iliac DVT is always a silent process, and that you have this consistency, that I find very striking. - [Woman] So what do you think the mechanism is? The hypervascularity looked like it was primarily

arterial fluffy vessels. - [Robert] No, no, no it's in the vein wall. If you look closely, the arteriovenous connections and the hypervascularity, it's in the vein wall. The lesion is the vein wall,

it's the inflammatory vein. You remember Tony, that the thing that I always think of is how we used to do plain old ballon angioplasty in the SFA. And afterwards we'd get this

florid venous filling sometimes, not every case. And that's the very tight anatomic connection between those two. That's what I think is happening. Wayne? - [Wayne] This amount is almost always been here.

We just haven't recognized it. What has been recognized is dural fistula-- - Yep. - That we know and that's been documented. Chuck Kerber, wrote the first paper in '73 about the microvascular circulation

in the dural surface of the dural fistula, and it's related to venous thrombosis and mastoiditis and trauma. And then as the healing process occurs, you have neovascular stimulation and fistulization in that dural reflection,

which is a vein wall. And the same process happens here with a DVT with the healing, the recanalization, inflammation, neovascular stimulation, and the development of fistulas. increased vascular flow into the lumen

of the thrombosed area. So it's a neovascular stimulation phenomenon, that results in the vein wall developing fistula very identical to what happens in the head with dural fistula had nothing described of in the periphery.

- [Narrator] Okay, very interesting hypothesis.

- Thank you very much, Frank, ladies and gentlemen. Thank you, Mr. Chairman. I have no disclosure. Standard carotid endarterectomy patch-plasty and eversion remain the gold standard of treatment of symptomatic and asymptomatic patient with significant stenosis. One important lesson we learn in the last 50 years

of trial and tribulation is the majority of perioperative and post-perioperative stroke are related to technical imperfection rather than clamping ischemia. And so the importance of the technical accuracy of doing the endarterectomy. In ideal world the endarterectomy shouldn't be (mumbling).

It should contain embolic material. Shouldn't be too thin. While this is feasible in the majority of the patient, we know that when in clinical practice some patient with long plaque or transmural lesion, or when we're operating a lesion post-radiation,

it could be very challenging. Carotid bypass, very popular in the '80s, has been advocated as an alternative of carotid endarterectomy, and it doesn't matter if you use a vein or a PTFE graft. The result are quite durable. (mumbling) showing this in 198 consecutive cases

that the patency, primary patency rate was 97.9% in 10 years, so is quite a durable procedure. Nowadays we are treating carotid lesion with stinting, and the stinting has been also advocated as a complementary treatment, but not for a bail out, but immediately after a completion study where it

was unsatisfactory. Gore hybrid graft has been introduced in the market five years ago, and it was the natural evolution of the vortec technique that (mumbling) published a few years before, and it's a technique of a non-suture anastomosis.

And this basically a heparin-bounded bypass with the Nitinol section then expand. At King's we are very busy at the center, but we did 40 bypass for bail out procedure. The technique with the Gore hybrid graft is quite stressful where the constrained natural stint is inserted

inside internal carotid artery. It's got the same size of a (mumbling) shunt, and then the plumbing line is pulled, and than anastomosis is done. The proximal anastomosis is performed in the usual fashion with six (mumbling), and the (mumbling) was reimplanted

selectively. This one is what look like in the real life the patient with the personal degradation, the carotid hybrid bypass inserted and the external carotid artery were implanted. Initially we very, very enthusiastic, so we did the first cases with excellent result.

In total since November 19, 2014 we perform 19 procedure. All the patient would follow up with duplex scan and the CT angiogram post operation. During the follow up four cases block. The last two were really the two very high degree stenosis. And the common denominator was that all the patients

stop one of the dual anti-platelet treatment. They were stenosis wise around 40%, but only 13% the significant one. This one is one of the patient that developed significant stenosis after two years, and you can see in the typical position at the end of the stint.

This one is another patient who develop a quite high stenosis at proximal end. Our patency rate is much lower than the one report by Rico. So in conclusion, ladies and gentlemen, the carotid endarterectomy remain still the gold standard,

and (mumbling) carotid is usually an afterthought. Carotid bypass is a durable procedure. It should be in the repertoire of every vascular surgeon undertaking carotid endarterectomy. Gore hybrid was a promising technology because unfortunate it's been just not produced by Gore anymore,

and unfortunately it carried quite high rate of restenosis that probably we should start to treat it in the future. Thank you very much for your attention.

- Good morning everybody. Here are my disclosures. So, upper extremity access is an important adjunct for some of the complex endovascular work that we do. It's necessary for chimney approaches, it's necessary for fenestrated at times. Intermittently for TEVAR, and for

what I like to call FEVARCh which is when you combine fenestrated repair with a chimney apporach for thoracoabdominals here in the U.S. Where we're more limited with the devices that we have available in our institutions for most of us. This shows you for a TEVAR with a patient

with an aortic occlusion through a right infracrevicular approach, we're able to place a conduit and then a 22-french dryseal sheath in order to place a TEVAR in a patient with a penetrating ulcer that had ruptured, and had an occluded aorta.

In addition, you can use this for complex techniques in the ascending aorta. Here you see a patient who had a prior heart transplant, developed a pseudoaneurysm in his suture line. We come in through a left axillary approach with our stiff wire.

We have a diagnostic catheter through the femoral. We're able to place a couple cuffs in an off-label fashion to treat this with a technically good result. For FEVARCh, as I mentioned, it's a good combination for a fenestrated repair.

Here you have a type IV thoraco fenestrated in place with a chimney in the left renal, we get additional seal zone up above the celiac this way. Here you see the vessels cannulated. And then with a nice type IV repaired in endovascular fashion, using a combination of techniques.

But the questions always arise. Which side? Which vessel? What's the stroke risk? How can we try to be as conscientious as possible to minimize those risks? Excuse me. So, anecdotally the right side has been less safe,

or concerned that it causes more troubles, but we feel like it's easier to work from the right side. Sorry. When you look at the image intensifier as it's coming in from the patient's left, we can all be together on the patient's right. We don't have to work underneath the image intensifier,

and felt like right was a better approach. So, can we minimize stroke risk for either side, but can we minimize stroke risk in general? So, what we typically do is tuck both arms, makes lateral imaging a lot easier to do rather than having an arm out.

Our anesthesiologist, although we try not to help them too much, but it actually makes it easier for them to have both arms available. When we look at which vessel is the best to use to try to do these techniques, we felt that the subclavian artery is a big challenge,

just the way it is above the clavicle, to be able to get multiple devices through there. We usually feel that the brachial artery's too small. Especially if you're going to place more than one sheath. So we like to call, at our institution, the Goldilocks phenomenon for those of you

who know that story, and the axillary artery is just right. And that's the one that we use. When we use only one or two sheaths we just do a direct puncture. Usually through a previously placed pledgeted stitch. It's a fairly easy exposure just through the pec major.

Split that muscle then divide the pec minor, and can get there relatively easily. This is what that looks like. You can see after a sheath's been removed, a pledgeted suture has been tied down and we get good hemostasis this way.

If we're going to use more than two sheaths, we prefer an axillary conduit, and here you see that approach. We use the self-sealing graft. Whenever I have more than two sheaths in, I always label the sheaths because

I can't remember what's in what vessel. So, you can see yes, I made there, I have another one labeled right renal, just so I can remember which sheath is in which vessel. We always navigate the arch first now. So we get all of our sheaths across the arch

before we selective catheterize the visceral vessels. We think this partly helps minimize that risk. Obviously, any arch manipulation is a concern, but if we can get everything done at once and then we can focus on the visceral segment. We feel like that's a better approach and seems

to be better for what we've done in our experience. So here's our results over the past five-ish years or so. Almost 400 aortic interventions total, with 72 of them requiring some sort of upper extremity access for different procedures. One for placement of zone zero device, which I showed you,

sac embolization, and two for imaging. We have these number of patients, and then all these chimney grafts that have been placed in different vessels. Here's the patients with different number of branches. Our access you can see here, with the majority

being done through right axillary approach. The technical success was high, mortality rate was reasonable in this group of patients. With the strokes being listed there. One rupture, which is treated with a covered stent. The strokes, two were ischemic,

one hemorrhagic, and one mixed. When you compare the group to our initial group, more women, longer hospital stay, more of the patients had prior aortic interventions, and the mortality rate was higher. So in conclusion, we think that

this is technically feasible to do. That right side is just as safe as left side, and that potentially the right side is better for type III arches. Thank you very much.

- These are my disclosures. So central venous access is frequently employed throughout the world for a variety of purposes. These catheters range anywhere between seven and 11 French sheaths. And it's recognized, even in the best case scenario, that there are iatrogenic arterial injuries

that can occur, ranging between three to 5%. And even a smaller proportion of patients will present after complications from access with either a pseudoaneurysm, fistula formation, dissection, or distal embolization. In thinking about these, as you see these as consultations

on your service, our thoughts are to think about it in four primary things. Number one is the anatomic location, and I think imaging is very helpful. This is a vas cath in the carotid artery. The second is th

how long the device has been dwelling in the carotid or the subclavian circulation. Assessment for thrombus around the catheter, and then obviously the size of the hole and the size of the catheter.

Several years ago we undertook a retrospective review and looked at this, and we looked at all carotid, subclavian, and innominate iatrogenic injuries, and we excluded all the injuries that were treated, that were manifest early and treated with just manual compression.

It's a small cohort of patients, we had 12 cases. Eight were treated with a variety of endovascular techniques and four were treated with open surgery. So, to illustrate our approach, I thought what I would do is just show you four cases on how we treated some of these types of problems.

The first one is a 75 year-old gentleman who's three days status post a coronary bypass graft with a LIMA graft to his LAD. He had a cordis catheter in his chest on the left side, which was discovered to be in the left subclavian artery as opposed to the vein.

So this nine French sheath, this is the imaging showing where the entry site is, just underneath the clavicle. You can see the vertebral and the IMA are both patent. And this is an angiogram from a catheter with which was placed in the femoral artery at the time that we were going to take care of this

with a four French catheter. For this case, we had duel access, so we had access from the groin with a sheath and a wire in place in case we needed to treat this from below. Then from above, we rewired the cordis catheter,

placed a suture-mediated closure device, sutured it down, left the wire in place, and shot this angiogram, which you can see very clearly has now taken care of the bleeding site. There's some pinching here after the wire was removed,

this abated without any difficulty. Second case is a 26 year-old woman with a diagnosis of vascular EDS. She presented to the operating room for a small bowel obstruction. Anesthesia has tried to attempt to put a central venous

catheter access in there. There unfortunately was an injury to the right subclavian vein. After she recovered from her operation, on cross sectional imaging you can see that she has this large pseudoaneurysm

coming from the subclavian artery on this axial cut and also on the sagittal view. Because she's a vascular EDS patient, we did this open brachial approach. We placed a stent graft across the area of injury to exclude the aneurism.

And you can see that there's still some filling in this region here. And it appeared to be coming from the internal mammary artery. We gave her a few days, it still was patent. Cross-sectional imaging confirmed this,

and so this was eventually treated with thoracoscopic clipping and resolved flow into the aneurism. The next case is a little bit more complicated. This is an 80 year-old woman with polycythemia vera who had a plasmapheresis catheter,

nine French sheath placed on the left subclavian artery which was diagnosed five days post procedure when she presented with a posterior circulation stroke. As you can see on the imaging, her vertebral's open, her mammary's open, she has this catheter in the significant clot

in this region. To manage this, again, we did duel access. So right femoral approach, left brachial approach. We placed the filter element in the vertebral artery. Balloon occlusion of the subclavian, and then a stent graft coverage of the area

and took the plasmapheresis catheter out and then suction embolectomy. And then the last case is a 47 year-old woman who had an attempted right subclavian vein access and it was known that she had a pulsatile mass in the supraclavicular fossa.

Was noted to have a 3cm subclavian artery pseudoaneurysm. Very broad base, short neck, and we elected to treat this with open surgical technique. So I think as you see these consults, the things to factor in to your management decision are: number one, the location.

Number two, the complication of whether it's thrombus, pseudoaneurysm, or fistula. It's very important to identify whether there is pericatheter thrombus. There's a variety of techniques available for treatment, ranging from manual compression,

endovascular techniques, and open repair. I think the primary point here is the prevention with ultrasound guidance is very important when placing these catheters. Thank you. (clapping)

- Thank you very much for the privilege of participating in this iconic symposium. I have no disclosures pertinent to this presentation. The Atelier percutaneous endovascular repair for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms is a natural evolution of procedural technique due to the success of fully percutaneous endovascular

aortic aneurysm repair in elective cases. This past year, we had the opportunity to publish our data with regard to 30 day outcomes between percutaneous ruptured aneurysm repairs and surgical cutdown repairs utilizing the American College of Surgeons NSQIP database,

which is a targeted database which enrolls about 800 hospitals in the United States, looking at both the univariate and multivariate analyses comparing preoperative demographics, operative-specific variables and postoperative outcomes. There were 502 patients who underwent

ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms that were included in this review, 129 that underwent percutaneous repair, whereas 373 underwent cutdown repair. As you can see, the majority were still being done by cutdown.

Over the four years, however, there was a gradual increase in the number of patients that were having percutaneous repair used as their primary modality of access, and in fact a more recent stasis has shown to increase up to 50%,

and there certainly was a learning curve during this period of time. Looking at the baseline characteristics of patients with ruptured aneurysms undergoing both modalities, there was not statistically significant difference

with regard to these baseline characteristics. Likewise, with size of the aneurysms, both were of equal sizes. There was no differences with regard to rupture having hypotension, proximal or distal extension of the aneurysms.

What is interesting, however, that the patients that underwent percutaneous repair tended to have regional anesthesia as their anesthesia of choice, rather than that of having a general. Also there was for some unexplained reason

a more significant conversion to open procedures in the percutaneous group as compared to the cutdown group. Looking at adjusted 30-day outcomes for ruptured endovascular aneurysm repairs, when looking at the 30-day mortality,

the operative time, wound complications, hospital length of stay, that was not statistically significant. However, over that four year period of time, there tended to be decreased hospital length of stay as well as decreased wound complications

over four years. So the summary of this study shows that there was an increased use of fully percutaneous access for endovascular repairs for ruptured aneurysms with noninferiority compared to traditional open femoral cutdown approaches.

There is a trending advantage over conventional surgical exposure with decreased access-related complications, as well as decreased hospital length of stay. Now, I'm going to go through some of the technical tips, and this is really going to be focused upon

the trainees in the room, and also perhaps those clinicians who do not do percutaneous access at this time. What's important, I find, is that the utility of duplex ultrasonography, and this is critical to delineate the common

femoral artery access anatomy. And what's important to find is the common femoral artery between the inguinal ligament and this bifurcation to the profunda femoral and superficial femoral arteries. So this is your target area. Once this target area is found,

especially in those patients presenting with ruptured aneurysm, local anesthesia is preferred over general anesthesia with permissive hypotension. This is a critical point that once you use ultrasound, that you'd want to orient your probe to be

90 degrees to the target area and measure the distance between the skin and the top of that artery. Now if you hold that needle at equidistance to that same distance between the skin and the artery and angle that needle at 45 degrees,

this will then allow you to have the proper trajectory to hit the target absolutely where you're imaging the vessel, and this becomes important so you're not off site. Once micropuncture technique is used, it's always a good idea just to use

a quick fluoroscopic imaging to show that your access is actually where you want it to be. If it's not, you can always re-stick the patient again. Once you have the access in place, what can then happen is do a quick angio to show in fact you have reached the target vessel.

This is the routine instructions for use by placing the percutaneous suture-mediated closure system at 45 degree angles from one another, 90 degrees from one another. Once the sheath is in place for ruptured aneurysm, the placement of a ballon occlusion

can be done utilizing a long, at least 12 French sheath so that they'll keep that balloon up in place. What's also good is to keep a neat operative field, and by doing so, you can keep all of these wires and sutures clean and out of the way and also color code the sutures so that you have

ease and ability to close them later. Finally, it's important to replace the dilator back in the sheath prior to having it removed. This is important just so that if there are problems with your percutaneous closure, you can always very quickly replace your sheath back in.

Again, we tend to color code the sutures so we can know which ones go with which. You can also place yet a third percutaneous access closure device if need be by keeping the guide wire in place. One other little trick that I actually learned

from Ben Starnes when visiting his facility is to utilize a Rumel mediated technique by placing a short piece of IV tubing cut length, running the suture through that, and using it like a Rumel, and that frees up your hand as you're closing up

the other side and final with closure. The contraindications to pREVAR. And I just want to conclude that there's increased use of fully percutaneous access for endovascular repair. There's trending advantages over conventional surgical exposure with decreased

access related complications, and improved outcomes can be attributed to increased user experience and comfort with percutaneous access, and this appears to be a viable first option. Thank you very much.

- Thank you again for the opportunity to discuss the BlueLeaf Endovenous Valve with potential benefits of on an all-autogenous solution. The last slide was a nice segue to this presentation, so the financial relationship. So we've discussed extensively at this meeting treatments for superficial venous

reflux outflow obstruction, and, really, the last sort of frontier is the deep vein reflux where invasive surgery is still the gold standard, but I basically say that the majority of us, or at least myself and many of us in our practice,

resort to what I refer to as palliative care or conservative managements in patients who have maximally been treated for their outflow obstruction and superficial venous reflux. This is sort of an outstanding review

of the current state of deep venous reconstructive surgery by Dr. Maleti, Lugli, and Tripathi who said the trap door technique as well as the neovalve and the corresponding outcomes, and I encourage all of you to look at it, are pretty reassuring even with the limitations.

The ulcer recurrence rates are in the 20-30% range and the vales remain competent in 70% of cases, and the results of the neovalve reconstruction are also reasonably promising. So how do we take these reasonably and pretty promising results and try to expand them?

Potentially, what would it look like as a percutaneous approach? And it might look something like this. And this is the BlueLeaf Endovenous Valve Formation System which uses a catheter system, a nitinol dissector, and a needle assembly,

and it's done under intravascular ultrasound guidance. This is what the procedure looks like in the basic three steps. After you've gained access with a 16 French sheath in the common femoral vein you identify the valve site,

the appropriate valve site with the IVUS, you perform, you gain sub-intimal access, and then perform the hydrodissection, and then you create your valve. And this is how it goes. So after you've gained wire access

you advance your intravascular ultrasound in order to identify the valve formation site. Right now it's quantitated at seven to 11 millimeters in diameter and at least three centimeters in length. You then inflate the balloon to appose the vein wall,

to create some tension in the vein wall, and thereafter your needle assembly can create that sub-intimal plane with the hydrodissection, and you see how the bevel tip retracts to make it less traumatic. You're checking with intravascular ultrasound.

You advance the dissector. And then under IVUS guidance you create the valve with the nitinol scoring blades on the dissector as well as the tensioner which kind of bows out towards the IVUS, and you can see it on the corresponding IVUS images.

And the very last step is to leave the blades open to open up the mouth of that percutaneous valve fully. And the advantages. You can create a monocuspid, a bicuspid valve, potentially multilevel valves as well. In this tissue demonstration

you're essentially looking from within the vein walls, so the tensioner is pointing out towards you as if you're within the lumen of the vessel, and it's just showing you how the nitinol scoring blades create the valve and then when left open for the final passage

to incise the valve mouth. And this is what the result looks like on intravascular ultrasound. It projects well the last couple seconds of the slide. So the potential advantages is that there's an increased potential for customization.

Again, monocuspid, bicuspid valve orientation, multilevel valves. (mumbles) may lead to a larger eligible patient population and expanded utilization amongst various venous practitioners. The extended feasibility study.

The trial details are currently enrolling outside of the United States. 11 patient in Australia and New Zealand. The US trial is pending IDE approval, and the inclusion criteria will be those patients with the most severe disease with C5 and C6 disease

and significant deep vein reflux. Exclusion criteria relate to inflow, outflow, and having an adequate conduit with an appropriate valve formation site. Thank you.

- Thank you chairman, ladies and gentlemen. I have no conflict of interest for this talk. So, basically for vTOS we have the well known treatment options. Either the conservative approach with DOAC or anticoagulation for three months or longer supported by elastic stockings.

And alternatively there's the invasive approach with catheter thrombolysis and decompression surgery and as we've just heard in the talk but Ben Jackson, also in surgeons preference, additional PTA and continuation or not of anticoagulation.

And basically the chosen therapy is very much based on the specific specialist where the patient is referred to. Both treatment approaches have their specific complications. Rethrombosis pulmonary embolism,

but especially the post-thrombotic syndrome which is reported in conservative treatment in 26 up to 66%, but also in the invasive treatment approach up to 25%. And of course there are already well known complications related to surgery.

The problem is, with the current evidence, that it's only small retrospective studies. There is no comparative studies and especially no randomized trials. So basically there's a lack of high quality evidence leading to varying guideline recommendations.

And I'm not going through them in detail 'cause it's a rather busy slide. But if you take a quick look then you can see some disparencies between the different guidelines and at some aspects there is no recommendation at all,

or the guidelines refer to selected patients, but they define how they should be selected. So again, the current evidence is insufficient to determine the most clinically and cost effective treatment approach, and we believe that a randomized trial is warranted.

And this is the UTOPIA trial. And I'm going to take you a bit through the design. So the research question underline this trial is, does surgical treatment, consisting of catheter directed thrombolysis and first rib section, significantly reduce post-thrombotic syndrome

occurrence, as compared to conservative therapy with DOAC anticoagulation, in adults with primary upper extremity deep vein thrombosis? The design is multicenter randomized and the population is all adults with first case of primary Upper Extremity

Deep Venous Thrombosis. And our primary outcome is occurrence of post-thrombotic syndrome, and this the find according the modified Villalta score. And there are several secondary outcomes, which of course we will take into account,

such as procedural complications, but also quality of life. This is the trial design. Inclusion informed consent and randomization are performed at first presentation either with the emergency department or outpatient clinic.

When we look at patients 18 years or older and the symptoms should be there for less than 14 days. Exclusion criteria are relevant when there's a secondary upper extremity deep vein thrombosis or any contra-indication for DOACs or catheter directed thrombolysis.

We do perform imaging at baseline with a CT venography. We require this to compare baseline characteristics of both groups to mainly determine what the underlying cause of the thrombosis being either vTOS or idiopathic.

And then a patient follows the course of the trial either the invasive treatment with decompression surgery and thrombolysis and whether or not PTA is required or not, or conservative treatment and we have to prefer DOAC Rivaroxaban or apixaban to be used.

Further down the patient is checked for one month and the Villalta score is adapted for use in the upper extremity and we also apply quality of life scores and scores for cost effectiveness analysis. And this is the complete flowchart of the whole trial.

Again, very busy slide, but just to show you that the patient is followed up at several time points, one, three, six, and 12 months and the 12 months control is actually the endpoint of the trial

And then again, a control CT venography is performed. Sample size and power calculation. We believe that there's an effect size of 20% reduction in post-thrombotic syndrome in favor of the invasive treatment and there's a two-side p-value of 0.05

and at 80% power, we consider that there will be some loss to follow up, and therefore we need just over 150 patients to perform this trial. So, in short, this slide more or less summarize it. It shows the several treatment options

that are available for these patients with Upper Extremity Venous Thrombosis. And in the trial we want to see, make this comparison to see if anticoagulation alone is as best as invasive therapy. I thank for your attention.

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