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Cholangiocarcinoma | 68 | Female
Cholangiocarcinoma | 68 | Female
2016bilebiliarycholangiogramdilatedducthepaticlaparoscopicSIRstricture
Going Rogue: Off The Grid Venous Malformation Sclerotherapeutic Techniques
Going Rogue: Off The Grid Venous Malformation Sclerotherapeutic Techniques
coil embolizationPersisting Venous MalformationsclerotherapyTherapeutic / Diagnostic
How To Use Endoanchors To Treat Type 1 Endoleaks After TEVAR And EVAR
How To Use Endoanchors To Treat Type 1 Endoleaks After TEVAR And EVAR
aortaarchchannelconicaldilatedendograftendoleakendoleaksevarexcessivegraftinferiorleakmigratedneckssealseriessuccesssuperiorTEVARthoracictypezone
More Effective Techniques Of Thrombolysis With Microbubbles And Ultrasound: Feasibility, Safety And Effectiveness In A Clinical Study (The MUST Trial)
More Effective Techniques Of Thrombolysis With Microbubbles And Ultrasound: Feasibility, Safety And Effectiveness In A Clinical Study (The MUST Trial)
acuteadversealteplaseangiographyarterialboluscontrastduplexendothelialfeasibilityhypersensitivityinfarctionintensityischaemiaischemiclimbmechanicalmicrobubblesmilligrammyocardialnanoparticlesnativeoccludedpatientsperipheralprostheticrevascularizationrutherfordsafetyTherapeutic / DiagnosticthrombolysisthrombolyticthrombolyticsthrombosedthrombustreatedtrialultrasoundurokinaseVeithvenous
The Flex Scoring Catheter (From Ventura Med): A Simple Cost-Effective Method For Lesion Preparation Prior To DCB Use: How It Works, Advantages And Early Results
The Flex Scoring Catheter (From Ventura Med): A Simple Cost-Effective Method For Lesion Preparation Prior To DCB Use: How It Works, Advantages And Early Results
ballooncalcificationcatheterchroniccircumferentialcompliancectosdedicateddevicedissectionsfemoropoplitealFistulaflexincisionsinterventionallengthlesionluminalmoderateocclusionpoplitealscoringScoring catheter for vessel preparationshaftstenttherapeuticVentureMed Groupvessel
Value Of An OTS t-Branched Graft To Treat TAAAs: How Often Is It Possible Based On Results From 3 Large Centers
Value Of An OTS t-Branched Graft To Treat TAAAs: How Often Is It Possible Based On Results From 3 Large Centers
adjuvantaneurysmsaorticapplicabilityarteryBEVARbridgingceliaccorddiameterendograftsendoleakendovascularevarexpandGORE MedicalGore Viabahn VBXgraftsiliacischemialimitationsmajoritymultiorganobservationalOpen AAA repairorificeparaplegiapatientpatientspercutaneouslyperformedprospectiveproximalrenalrenal arteryspinalstemstenosisstentstent graft systemstentedtherapeuticthrombectomythrombocytopeniatreatedvesselvisceralZenith T-Branch (Cook Medical)
Histology of In-stent Stenosis
Histology of In-stent Stenosis
angioplastiedangioplastyAnti-platelet therapyanticoagulationascendingbiopsyBoston ScientificcalcificationcontrastdiffuseDiffuse severe in-stent stenosisEndoprosthesisextendingfemoralfollowupfreshhistologyiliacintimalmaximalnitinolocclusionorganizingoutflowoverlappingpoplitealPost- thrombotic SyndromePTArecanalizationreliningRelining with WallstentsstenosisstentstentingstentssuperficialTherapeutic / DiagnosticthickeningthrombolysisthrombustimelineVeithvenogramwallstentwallstents
Importance Of Optimal Postoperative Glucose Management After Vascular Surgery: Why It Matters And What Are The Keys
Importance Of Optimal Postoperative Glucose Management After Vascular Surgery: Why It Matters And What Are The Keys
associatecarotidcomplicationscontroldiabeteselectiveendovascularevarextremityglucoseglycemichyperglycemiaincreasedinfectioninfectionsinfectiousinferiorlengthlookedlowermarkermortalityOAAA RepairoptimaloutcomespatientspostoperativeproceduresreadmissionrisksurgerysurgicalTherapeutic / Diagnostictimesundergoingvascular
Imaging Tools To Increase The Safety/Accuracy Of Endovascular Procedures And Reduce Radiation And Contrast Media
Imaging Tools To Increase The Safety/Accuracy Of Endovascular Procedures And Reduce Radiation And Contrast Media
anatomyangioplastyarterialBaylis MedicalcontrastCVOdefinediagnosticfusedfusiongraftguidewireiliacLeft CIA PTA using Vessel ASSISTocclusionoutlinepatientphasePowerWire RFprettyPTAradialsnarestenosisstentstentstotallyveinsVessel ASSIST (GE Healthcare) - Fusion Imagingvesselswire
2-Year ANCHOR Registry Data Show That Endoanchors Can Prevent Neck Dilatation After EVAR With Self-Expanding Devices
2-Year ANCHOR Registry Data Show That Endoanchors Can Prevent Neck Dilatation After EVAR With Self-Expanding Devices
aneurysmaortaaorticappositionarterydegenerativediameterdilatationdistalEndoanchorEndoanchor systemendograftendoleaksendovascularevargraftHeli-FXlowestMedtronicnecknegligibleoccurredoversizepatientspredictorspresenceprotectiveproximalrenalrenal arterystabilizesuprarenaltherapeuticType 1A endoleackvariables
What Are The Complications Of Spinal Fluid Drainage: How Can They Be Prevented: Optimal Strategies For Preventing Or Minimizing SCI
What Are The Complications Of Spinal Fluid Drainage: How Can They Be Prevented: Optimal Strategies For Preventing Or Minimizing SCI
aneurysmAneurysm repairaxisBEVARceliacchronicDialysisdraindrainagedrainseliminatedextentFEVARflowFluid / PressorsheadachehematomahemorrhagehypotensionincludingintracranialOccluded SMAoutcomespalliativeparaplegiapatientpatientsplacementpostoperativeprolongedprospectiveprotocolratesevereSevere PancreatitisspinalTEVARtherapeutictreated
Update On The Advantages, Limitations And Midterm Results With The Terumo Aortic 3 Branch Arch Device: What Lesions Can It Treat
Update On The Advantages, Limitations And Midterm Results With The Terumo Aortic 3 Branch Arch Device: What Lesions Can It Treat
4 branch CMD TAAA deviceacuteAscending Graft Replacementcardiac arrestRelayBranchRepair segment with CMD Cuffruptured type A dissection w/ tamponadestent graft systemTerumo Aortictherapeutic
Are Mesh Covered Stents Living Up To Their Potential For Improving CAS Outcomes: Results Of A RCT
Are Mesh Covered Stents Living Up To Their Potential For Improving CAS Outcomes: Results Of A RCT
assessmentbilateralbiomarkersCASCGuardcomparingcontracontralateraldetectabledetecteddifferenceemboliembolicEmbolic Prevention StentembolismenrolledhoursInspireMD)ipsilateralischemiclesionmaximalmicroneuroneurologicaloperativelypatientpatientsperformedperioperativeplaquepostpostoperativepredilationpreoperativeproteinrandomizedratescoresilentstenosisstentstentssubclinicaltesttherapeuticwallstentWALLSTENT (Boston Scientific) - Endoprosthesis / FilterWire (Boston Scientific) - Embolic Protection System
How To Decrease Radiation Exposure To Operators And Assistants During Standard And Complex EVARs
How To Decrease Radiation Exposure To Operators And Assistants During Standard And Complex EVARs
advancedavoidingceliacdeclineddiagnosticdiscoverydoseendovascularevarfenestratedfindingfluoroscopicfluoroscopyframesfusionidealimagingminimizeminimizingoperatorpreoperativeradiationseptumstentsystem
Current Treatment Options For Limb Threatening Hand Ischemia: How Good Are Their Results
Current Treatment Options For Limb Threatening Hand Ischemia: How Good Are Their Results
amputationarteriovenousarterycriticaldiseaseembolizedendoscopicFistulahandhemodialysisischemiaischemicmultiplemyelomaoccludedocclusionpalmarPathophysiologypatientpatientsprosthesesproximalradialradiocephalicshortestthoracictotallytransplantulnarvascular
Yakes Type IV Infiltrative AVMs Curative Treatment Strategies: A New Entity
Yakes Type IV Infiltrative AVMs Curative Treatment Strategies: A New Entity
arterialarteriolesarteriovenousavmscapillariescapillarycontrastdirectethanolfistulasflowhemodynamicsinfiltratinglesionlowermixturemultiplenormaloccludeoutflowPathophysiologyphysiologicpuncturerefluxtissuetransarterialtreattypeveinveinsvesselsyakes
Update On The Value Of Tight Glucose Control To Minimize SCI From TEVAR And F/B/EVAR Treatment Of TAAAs
Update On The Value Of Tight Glucose Control To Minimize SCI From TEVAR And F/B/EVAR Treatment Of TAAAs
acuteaneurysmaneurysmsantihypertensivebloodclinicalcorddecreaseeffectselevatedendovascularextremityglucosehourshydrationhyperglycemiainfusioninitiationinsulinischemiclevelslowerMBEVARmultimodalneuronalparaplegiapatientsperfusionpostoperativepreoperativeprotocolproximalspinalsubarachnoidtherapeuticthoracoabdominalundergoingunderwentVeithweakness
NaHCO3 Plus Hydration Decreases Acute Kidney Failure After EVAR: Based On A Pilot RCT (The HYDRA Trial) Comparing It To Hydration Alone: Why Is It Different From Other Negative NaHCO3 RCTs
NaHCO3 Plus Hydration Decreases Acute Kidney Failure After EVAR: Based On A Pilot RCT (The HYDRA Trial) Comparing It To Hydration Alone: Why Is It Different From Other Negative NaHCO3 RCTs
bicarbonateboluscardiovascularcombinationcomparingcoronarydoseevarhydrationHypertensionintralowmechanismspatientsperipheralpreviousrandomizedreducingrenalsalinesodiumstandardTherapeutic / Diagnostictrialtrialswillingness
DEBATE: Not So: Prosthetic Open Bypasses Should Be Used To Treat Most Popliteal Aneurysms: When Are They Mandatory
DEBATE: Not So: Prosthetic Open Bypasses Should Be Used To Treat Most Popliteal Aneurysms: When Are They Mandatory
anastomosisaneurysmarterybypasscollateralsdistalendovascularEPARgraftkneepatientpatientspoplitealprostheticvenous
Cloud Based System For Image Fusion Techniques With Mobile C-Arms (The Cydar System): How Does It Work And Advantages For All Vascular Interventions
Cloud Based System For Image Fusion Techniques With Mobile C-Arms (The Cydar System): How Does It Work And Advantages For All Vascular Interventions
anatomyaorticaortoiliacAortoiliac occlusive diseasebasedBilateral Kissing StentsbodiesclinicalcontrastCydar EV (Cydar Medical) - Cloud SoftwaredecreasesderivedendovascularevarFEVARfluorofluoroscopyfusionhardwarehybridiliacimageimagesimagingmechanicaloverlaypatientpostureprocedureproximalqualityradiationreductionscanstandardstatisticallytechnologyTEVARTherapeutic / DiagnostictrackingvertebralZiehm ImagingZiehm RFD C-arm
Lymphatic Intervention: Thoracic Duct Embolization, Pulmonary Lymphatic Perfusion Syndrome, And Hepatic Lymphatic Disorders
Lymphatic Intervention: Thoracic Duct Embolization, Pulmonary Lymphatic Perfusion Syndrome, And Hepatic Lymphatic Disorders
accesscontrastductembolizationembolizingglueinduceinterventionalInterventionsleakagelipiodolliverlymphlymphangiographylymphaticlymphaticsneedlenodepercutaneousperfusionperiportalrefluxTherapeutic / Diagnosticthoracicultrasoundvariationvenousvesselsvisualize
New Developments In The Treatment Of Venous Thoracic Outlet Syndromes
New Developments In The Treatment Of Venous Thoracic Outlet Syndromes
angioplastyanterioranticoagulationantiplateletapproacharteryaxillaryBalloon angioplastycameracontraindicateddegreedischargeddrainduplexhematologyhypercoagulabilityincisionintraoperativelaparoscopicOcclusion of left subclavian axillary veinoperativePatentpatientspercutaneousPercutaneous mechanical thrombectomyperformingpleurapneumothoraxposteriorpostoppreoperativepulsatilereconstructionresectionsubclaviansurgicalthoracicthrombectomyTransaxillary First Rib ResectionTransaxillary First Rib Resection (One day later)uclavalsalvaveinvenogramvenographyvenousvisualization
Advantages Of The Gore VBX Balloon Expandable Stent-Graft For F/EVAR, Ch/EVAR And Aorto-Iliac Occlusive Disease
Advantages Of The Gore VBX Balloon Expandable Stent-Graft For F/EVAR, Ch/EVAR And Aorto-Iliac Occlusive Disease
anatomiesaneurysmaneurysmsaortobifemoralaortoiliacarterybrachialbranchcatheterizedCHcustomizablecustomizedistallyendovascularevarexcellentFfenestratedFenestrated GraftfenestrationflarefollowupGORE MedicalGore Viabahn VBXgraftgraftshypogastriciliaciliacsmodelingoccludedocclusiveparallelpatencyperfusionproximalpseudoaneurysmPseudoaneurysm of the proximal juxtarenal graft anastomosisptferenalsSelective Catheterization of the Right CIA to Hypogastric Arterystenosisstentstent graft systemstentstherapeuticVBX Stent Graftvesselvesselsvisceral
Surveillance Protocol And Reinterventions After F/B/EVAR
Surveillance Protocol And Reinterventions After F/B/EVAR
aneurysmangiographicaorticarteryBbranchbranchedcatheterizationcatheterizedceliaccommoncommon iliacembolizationembolizedendoleakendoleaksevarFfenestratedfenestrationFEVARgastricgrafthepatichypogastriciiiciliacimplantleftleft renalmayomicrocatheternidusOnyx EmbolizationparaplegiapreoperativeproximalreinterventionreinterventionsrenalrepairreperfusionscanstentStent graftsuperselectivesurgicalTEVARtherapeuticthoracicthoracoabdominaltreatedtypeType II Endoleak with aneurysm growth of 1.5 cmVeithvisceral
Transcript

abdominal pain and fever one week after laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The point of this case is trust no one. I mean this is a very abnormal cholangiogram

but there is a very sharp stricture of left hepatic duct and this does not look like a recently dilated biliary tree. This is like the patient ended up having a classic cholangiocarcinoma. So what's transferred in is bile duct injury, is not always a bile duct injury and have high index suspicion for something else going on. And that's the last case

I've got, thanks.

- Thank you. Thank you again for the invitation, and also my talk concerns the use of new Terumo Aortic stent graft for the arch. And it's the experience of three different countries in Europe. There's no disclosure for this topic.

Just to remind what we have seen, that there is some complication after surgery, with mortality and the stroke rate relatively high. So we try to find some solution. We have seen that we have different options, it could be debranching, but also

we know that there are some complications with this technique, with the type A aortic dissection by retrograde way. And also there's a way popular now, frozen elephant trunk. And you can see on the slide the principle.

But all the patients are not fit for this type of surgery. So different techniques have been developed for endovascular options. And we have seen before the principle of Terumo arch branch endograft.

One of the main advantages is a large window to put the branches in the different carotid and brachiocephalic trunk. And one of the benefit is small, so off-the-shelf technique, with one size for the branch and different size

for the different carotids. This is a more recent experience, it's concerning 15 patients. And you can see the right column that it is. All the patients was considered unfit for conventional surgery.

If we look about more into these for indication, we can see four cases was for zone one, seven cases for zone two, and also four cases for zone three. You can see that the diameter of the ascending aorta, the min is 38,

and for the innominate artery was 15, and then for left carotid was eight. This is one example of what we can obtain with this type of handling of the arch with a complete exclusion of the lesion, and we exclude the left sonography by plyf.

This is another, more complex lesion. It's actually a dissection and the placement of a stent graft in this area. So what are the outcomes of patients? We don't have mortality, one case of hospital mortality.

We don't have any, sorry, we have one stroke, and we can see the different deaths during the follow-up. If we look about the endoleaks, we have one case of type three endoleak started by endovascular technique,

and we have late endoleaks with type one endoleaks. In this situation, it could be very difficult to treat the patient. This is the example of what we can observe at six months with no endoleak and with complete exclusion of the lesion.

But we have seen at one year with some proximal type one endoleak. In this situation, it could be very difficult to exclude this lesion. We cannot propose this for this patient for conventional surgery, so we tried

to find some option. First of all, we tried to fix the other prosthesis to the aortic wall by adjusted technique with a screw, and we can see the fixation of the graft. And later, we go through the,

an arrangement inside the sac, and we put a lot of colors inside so we can see the final results with complete exclusion. So to conclude, I think that this technique is very useful and we can have good success with this option, and there's a very low

rate of disabling stroke and endoleaks. But, of course, we need more information, more data. Thank you very much for your attention.

3

- These are my disclosures. So we all know the problems with long-term failure of EVAR and TEVAR. Type one endoleak being a particular significant concern. We've heard the results of the three year ANCHOR Registry. We know from this 85% of those cases taken on for type one endoleak were successful

and it's fantastic that these cases are still successful at three years. But I guess it's 15% failures and it's important that we talk about how we get success like this. If we're going to talk about a recipe for success we need to think about first of all the indications

for treatment of endoleaks. This is key. Not all endoleaks are the same. Those endoleaks where there's an inadvertent creation of a leak channel around the graft at the top end because of a hostile landing zone

or excessive oversiding of your graft or noncircular aorta, all can be well treated with endoanchors. Again, migration and loss of seal can also be well treated. But others where there's excessive thrombus or calcium won't work and where there's insufficient apposition between the graft and the aorta, again,

this is not a treatment case for endoanchors. So intraoperative type one endoleaks where there's poor conformability of the graft you can see here this barrel-shaped neck, there's a leak around the aorta, and there's a series of endoanchors

placed in rows circumferentially, do really well to seal up that. You can do the same at the distal end of the thoracic graft as we've just seen in those conical necks when you have a type one endoleak. If you have time to treat your leak channel,

you want to get a CT scan and evaluate where that leak channel is. Or you can do more detailed imaging with triangulation on angiography, but that's difficult. You fix the side away from the endoanchor first,

and then fixing rows of staples along the endoleak channel as you can see here, by moving the C-Arm in 15 degree increments across the aortic wall. This is a good example of a case with a leak channel. This graft is in the angulated aorta

with a channel underneath in the bottom end. There's a big endoleak there. And what we've done is fix the contralateral side first and then you're placing a series or rows of endoanchors underneath the stent graft. You can even zipper that up to change the bird beaking.

And that endoleak stayed sealed for three years. The same is true in the proximal thoracic aorta. This is one of Firas Mussa's cases. There's an endoleak on the underside of the arch and five endoanchors placed on the underside of the arch as we've just seen in JP's talk,

can resolve that endoleak quite successfully. When you are doing it in the arch you do need to plan properly. If you have an endoleak at the end of the case what you can do is put the C-Arm in an LAO position and line up the markers on the graft,

place the superior and inferior endoanchors and then rotate cranially and caudally at 15 degree intervals to put a series of endoanchors at the superior and inferior surfaces. That will fix the graft well. Otherwise, if you've got time and plan the case well,

you can work out dedicated C-Arm angles using one of the CT evaluation softwares. The best example is written by Rousseau, and I would get you to read that article to learn further. And that's how I learnt. There is a learning curve.

And this is necessary for success in treating type one endoleaks. You need some experience to gain good endoanchor placement. That's crucial, we've heard that. Start with the infrarenal segment, doing prophylactic cases,

the conical necks and slightly dilated necks, and then move into the thoracic segment. You need to use different size guides for different parts of the arch. On the upper surface the smaller guide is more useful. On the undersurface a larger guide to place the endoanchors

on the under surfaces of the arch is useful. Place them in rows coming back and have some patience. It's not all as easy as it looks right up there in the arch. For migration it's often an excellent strategy. If you can fix your migrated endograft to the native neck it's a good thing to do.

But remember these grafts have migrated and there's often great tortuosity there. If you can extend to gain a seal zone and then place a series of circumferential endoanchors it will fix that well and usually stay fixed for a good period of time.

There are limitations as I alluded to in the first few slides, excessive thrombus, excessive calcification, and where the aorta is dilated excessively and the endograft has stayed the same size. These will not work with endoanchor placement.

These are my tips, really, for success. There is a learning curve. Start with some easier ones. Think about the endoleak and why you've got an endoleak and don't be tricked into thinking the endoanchors will create a landing zone for you.

It won't. You should treat the type one endoleak immediately if you have it at the end of the case with re-interventions. You need to target that effectively and place multiple rows often cranially and caudally. And if you have one of the 13.4% failures,

remember that the use of endoanchors doesn't preclude you from doing something else so don't be too depressed. Thank you very much.

- Mister Chairman, ladies and gentlemen. Good morning. I am excited to present some of the data on the new device here. These are my disclosure. There are opportunities to improve current TEVAR devices. One of that is to have a smaller device,

is a rapid deployment that is precise, and wider possibilities to have multiple size matrix to adapt to single patient anatomy. The Valiant device actually tried to meet all these unmet needs, and nowadays the Navion has been designed on the platform

of the Valiant Captivia device with a completely different solution. First of all, it's four French smaller than the Valiant Captivia, and now it's 18 French in outer diameter for the smallest sizes available.

The device has been redesigned with a shorter tip and longer length of the shaft to approach more proximal diseases, and the delivery system deploys the graft in one step that is very easy to accomplish and precise.

The fabric has been changed with nowadays the Navion having the multi-filament weave of the Endurant that already demonstrates conformability, flexibility, and long-term durability of the material. It's coming with a wide matrix of options available. In terms of length, up to 225 mm.

Diameters as small as 20 mm, and tapered device to treat particular anatomical needs. But probably the most important innovation is the possibility to have two proximal configuration options: the FreeFlo and the CoveredSeal.

Both tied to the tip of the device with the tip-capture mechanism that ensures proximal deployment of the graft that is very accurate. This graft is being under trial in a global trial

that included 100 patients all over the world. The first 87 patients have been submitted for primary endpoint analysis. 40% of the patients were females. High risk patients showed here by the ASA class III and IV. Most of the patients presented

with a fusiform or saccular aneurysm, and the baseline anatomy is quite typical for these kinds of patients, but most of the patients have the very tortuous indices, both at the level of the access artery tortuosity and the thoracic aorta tortuosity.

Three-fourths of the patients had been treated with a FreeFlo proximal end of the graft, while one-fourth with the CoveredSeal. Complete coverage of the left subclavian occurred in one-fifth of the patients. Almost all had been revascularized.

Procedure was quite short, less than one and half hour, percutaneous access in the majority of cases. There were no access or deployment failures in this series. And coming to the key clinical endpoints, there were two mortality reported out of 87 patients.

One was due to the retrograde type A dissection at day one, and one was not device related almost at the end of the first month. Secondary procedures were again two. One was in the case of retrograde type A dissection, and the second one in a patient

that had an arch rupture due to septicemia. Type 1a endoleak was reported in only one case, and it was felt to be no adverse event associated so was kept under surveillance without any intervention. Major Adverse Events occurred in 28% of the cases. Notably four patients had a stroke

that was mild and not disabling, regressing in two weeks. Only one case of spinal cord ischaemia that resolved by drainage and therapy in 20 days. In summary, we can say that the design enhancement of Valiant Navion improved upon current generation TEVAR.

Acute performance is quite encouraging: no access or deployment failure, low procedural and fluoro times, low rate of endoleaks, Major Adverse Events in the range expected for this procedure.

Nowadays the graft is USA FDA approved as well as in Europe CE mark. And of course we have to wait the five years results.

- So thank you ladies and gentleman, thank you Doctor Veith for inviting me again this year. These are my disclosures. So more effective thrombolysis by microbubbles and ultrasound has been proven actually effective in earlier studies, treating a myocardial infarction or acute ischemic stroke.

But what are these microbubbles? These are 1 to 10 micrometers, gas-filled bubbles with a lipid shell. It oscillate when subjected to low intensity ultrasound, and can cavitate when subjected to high intensity ultrasound. Initially they were designed for diagnostic use

as intravascular contrast enhancers. However, they have many advantages, non-specifical mechanical effects, to induce thrombus breakdown due to mechanical force of microbubbles if they are subjected to ultrasound. So we conducted the first human trial

in peripheral arterial diseases in Microbubbles and UltraSound-accelerated Thrombolysis, the MUST study for peripheral arterial occlusions. Which is a single phase two trial for actually safety and feasibility study. The MUST-TRIAl consist out of 20 patients

for safety and feasibility, which in 10 patients will be treated with Urokinase, and 10 with Alteplase. And then added, for the first hour, microbubbles and we evaluated the VAS pain scores, duplex echography for circulation or revascularization, microcirculation and daily angiography as usual.

Included were men and women 18 to 85 years. A maximum of two weeks of symptoms of lower limb ischaemia due to thrombosed or occluded lower limb peripheral native arteries or venous or prosthetic bypass grafts. And Rutherford class 1 or 2A. They have to understand the nature of the procedure

and written informed consent. And excluded were all known factors that exclude standard thrombolysis therapy, hypersensitivity to contrast enhanced agents, a recent acute coronary syndrome. Endpoints, again, it's a safety

and then a technical feasibility trial. Also we looked at the organisation, and the treatment duration for technical, angiographic, and clinical success. We looked at the severe adverse event and mortality rates, VAS-pain scores and microcirculation.

If the patients came in, we inform them about the MUST trail, we performed an ECG analysis and informed consent. They fill out some questionnaires and when they come in to the angio-room, we started a thrombolysis with a catheter, the Mc Nemara.

And the first group, the Urokinase 10 patients, we treated with 500 units of bolus and then continued with a 50,000 units of Urokinase per hour. The Alteplase group had started with a 5 milligram bolus and then they continued with 1 milligram per hour

for the first 24 hours. And then, the ultrasound room, they got a bubble infusion for the first hour of treatment. Then we would continue with thrombolysis on a surgical ward, every sixth hour we'd look at if there was revascularization at the duplex ultrasound.

And if signs of revascularization are observed on the duplex ultrasound or on the next day, we routinely perform the angiography. Then we could cessate the thrombolytic therapy, and if necessary, acute or elective additional intervention to correct underlying lesions,

or to establish patencies. We check the wound and then we follow-up these patients every six weeks, three months, 6 months, and one year after thrombolytic therapy. So these are the patient characteristics, mostly of these were male, 70 years,

and five of them were native bypass, and five were a bypass occlusion, venous or prosthetic. And two of them had multiple occlusions, whether Rutherford class 1 or 2A. And these were the first 10 patients that were treated with Urokinase and I will present here

the results of these 10 patients first. So, very important, there were no deaths, no severe adverse events, and it was technical feasible. The flow at the duplex examination was there after 24 hours, but most of our patients actually had it already after 6 hours.

The amputation rate, right now, is zero. And also no bypasses were now needed. So we will continue this MUST trial right now and January we probably will have the inclusion of the group with the Alteplase, which I'll present next year.

And we think that microbubbles with Urokinase is a safe combination right now. We will further include the groups of adults placed and further optimalisation of the microbubbles technique with nanobubbles. Had a talk about that yesterday, so you can look it up.

And nanobubbles are nanoparticles of 5 to 500 nanometers, which are very small, they do not penetrate the endothelial barrier of the doubt and it damage. And it can carry the thrombolytics actually to the side the aorta catheter need it. You can also make the magnetic paste,

which means you can paste these patients on the MRI. Then you can have local treatment of thrombolytic therapy. So thank you for your attention.

- The FLEX Scoring Catheter is one of the new tools, which is dedicated to vessel preparation, either as a stent, as a therapy followed by plain balloon angioplasty, or preparing the vessel for drug-eluting balloons and stents. So, the background basically is that

we're more and more tackling chronic total occlusions, and these kind of lesions, they have an increased risk of being calcium-containing, creating dissections, perforations, embolization, and poor luminal gain. And for that purpose, this device, which is more or less

a kind of surgical device, was developed. It's a interventional tool which can be introduced via a six-French sheath. It's an over-the-wire system, running over a 14 or 18 thousandths guide wire. It's common in shaft lengths of

40 centimeters dedicated to AV, fistula treatment and 120 centimeters, and the device is exposed to the vessel wall with three atherotomes, with the indication for femoropopiliteal and AV fistula excess treatment. One size fits all is really the right description

of this device, except having two different shaft lengths, the device itself is coming in one size only. What does it result in? Well, it results in micro-incisions, as you can see it over here, also over here in an OCT image, and the depths of these incisions

is about 0.5 millimeters, the pressure which is applied to the surface is about one atmosphere, independent on the vessel size. So, the idea and the rationale for this device is to facilitate and increase the vessel compliance and to create an controlled environment for angioplasty.

There are, just recently, some specimen analysis performed by CBSET, what you can see over here, marked by arrows, these arrows indicate the FLEX-induced micro-incisions, and you can see that these incisions are really circumferential with controlled,

uniform depths of those incisions into the plaque or the vessel wall. This is a 150 times magnification and you can see these longitudinal micro-incisions, which are very much parallel, it's like using a cutting balloon,

the advantage, however, is that this device can be applied to even longer lesions, the limitation of a cutting balloon is the balloon length of 20 centimeters only. So what are the early results? I can present you the acute outcomes

of 100 patients' sample size, with chronic total femoropopliteal occlusions. We can see that the average lesion length was really significant, 191 millimeters, the range was up to 35 centimeters, and there was moderate to severe calcification

in almost 50% of those cases. The luminal gain post FLEX application was about 31%, and the following balloon opening pressure, which was documented within this registry, was four atmospheres only, which is a signal that really the vessel compliance

is significantly improved, considering the almost 50% of moderate to severe calcification of those lesions. There had been no emboli, there had been no flow-limiting dissections, nevertheless, the provisional stent use was still high with 19%.

This is one of two case examples I would like to share with you. This was an instant re-occlusion of the popliteal artery, 10 centimeters in length, this was passed with an 18 thousandths guide wire, three passes with the FLEX catheter had been performed,

as you can see over here. And this was then, this was the result after FLEX catheter application and this is post additional drug-coated balloon angioplasty, there was no dissection, there was no significant residual stenosis.

Another case example, unfortunately, the video will not run, this was a long distance flush occlusion of the SFA, and you can see the calcium here in the entire length of the lesion, this lesion was treated, again, with the FLEX catheter, here, the video is not running,

this is the final result after DCB application. So, in summary, there's a high degree of technical success in achieving consistent luminal gain post FLEX, there's a low opening balloon pressure, and the re-canalization of CTOs was possible with a low rate, zero rate of significant dissections

and the low provisional stent rate. Thank you very much.

- You'll be pleased to know we've got a bit better at using ceiling mounted lead shields and goggles, but there's still room for improvement. These are my disclosures. I thought I'd start just by putting into context the exposures that we receive as operators. So medical diagnostics scans

can be anything up to 25 millisieverts. If you're a classified radiation worker you can only get 20 millisieverts per year. Background radiation, depending on where you live, is something between one and 10 millisieverts per year. And it varies from department to department.

But for a complex endovascular branch and fenestrated case you get typically 50 microsieverts of radiation outside the lead. What is irrefutable is that once you get to 100 millisieverts you have got a raised risk of solid cancers and leukemia.

What we do not know, we simply don't know, is what is the dose response below that 100 millisievert threshold, and is there any individual differences in sensitivity to radiation? Why don't we know?

Because we're no good at following up operators and patients after they receive an exposure. What we need is stringent study design, we need well defined populations, they need to be large studies, 10s of thousands, we need to control for

all the confounding factors for cancer, we need really high quality followup, and we need to know what dose we're receiving. This is my interventional radiology colleague. He's been there since the inception of the complex endovascular program at St. Thomas',

and I asked him to tell me what he did over the past 10 years. And you can see that this is his logbook. It excludes quite a number of perhaps lower exposure cases including GI cases, dilatations, nephrostomies. So he's done 1071 cases in 10 years.

He doesn't know his dose. But if you think per case exposure is 20, 40, or 60 microsieverts you can see that the exposures quickly build up. And in a 20-year career he's going to breach probably that 100 microsievert threshold.

So these numbers are just worth thinking about. So what evidence do we have that exposure causes DNA damage? It has been looked at in mice. If you expose mice they have an increased instance of lung tumors, for example. The radiation at low dose causes DNA damage.

It shortens the life span, and importantly, the risk is synergistic with other risks like smoking. In the course of this DNA damage and repair process, the repair process is not perfect. And eventually you get genomic instability,

and that's what causes cancer. When the cell is irradiated with low doses you also get generation of bad factors such as ROS and inflammatory factor. And we have shown in in operators that you get DNA damage before and after

you carry out fluoroscopically guided case. You can see here foci of this gamma H2AX which signal DNA damage in operators. And what happens over long term? There are markers you can look for long term that show that you're exhibiting genomic instability,

and this includes diccentrics. You can see these chromosomes are abnormal, and that happens as result of chronic radiation exposure. And micronuclei, so you can see that these cells express micronuclei. That is abnormal.

That is genomic instability and that means that your risk of cancer is increased. We haven't measured for these yet in operators, but they may well be present. So I think you need a combination of physical and biological dosimetry.

How do you do that? Well you need high throughput methods for doing it, which we don't have as yet. The current methods are laborious. You need to cont lots of cells and it takes a long time to do it.

But perhaps with the next generation high throughout sequencing this is what we'll be doing. Regular samples from operators and deciding whether there exhibiting genomic instability or not, should they be doing something other than carrying out endovascular operations.

In the meantime, radiation is really dangerous. I think that's what we've got to assume. No matter how much of a dose you're getting it's dangerous. The ALARA principles, you should hopefully all be familiar with, maximal shielding, and as mentioned,

the zero gravity suit. We've started using this. And obviously we wear leg shields. Just as something different, I mentioned that when your cell gets irradiated it produces lots of nasty factors

such as radioactive oxygen species and pro-inflammatory factors, and that can again cause DNA damage. Kieran Murphy spoke earlier on in the previous session about effective low-dose exposure. What they've done is given a cocktail of antioxidants

to patients who have cancer staging. And that actually reduces DNA damage. This is another study that came out recently, another cocktail of antioxidants, exposed to cells in vitro that were irradiated, and this is probably a less relevant study

because it's all in vitro. But again, in a very controlled situation these antioxidants do reduce the production of inflammatory factors in DNA damage. So perhaps we should all be taking a cocktail of pills before we operate.

So in summary, we live in a world of increasing radiation exposures. The health effects are unknown. We need better radiation in epidemiology, a combination of biological and physical dosimetry probably, and in the meantime we have to insist

on maximal protection and assume that all radiation is dangerous. Thank you very much.

- So thank you for the kind introduction and thanks for professor Viet for the invitation again this year. So, if we talk about applicability, of course you have to check the eye views from this device and you're limited by few instructions for users. They changed the lengths between the target vessel

and the orifice and the branch, with less than 50 mm , they used to be less than 25 mm. Also keep in mind, that you need to have a distance of more than 67 mm between your renal artery cuff and your iliac bifurcation. The good thing about branch endografts

is that if you have renal artery which comes ... or its orifice at the same level of the SME, you can just advance and put your endorafts a bit more proximally, of course risking more coverage of your aorta and eventually risking high rate

of paraplegia or spinal cord ischemia. Also if your renal artery on one side or if your target vessel is much lower with longer bridging stent grafts which are now available like the VBX: 79 mm or combination of bridging stem grafts, this can be treated as well.

Proximally, we have short extensions like the TBE which only allows 77 or 81 mm. This can also expand its applicability of this device. The suitability has already been proven in.. or assessed by Gaspar and vistas and it came around plus 60%

of all patients with aortic aneurysms. Majority of them are limitations where the previous EVAR or open AAA repair or the narrow diameter reno visceral segment in case of diabetes sections. So, what about the safety of the T-branch device?

We performed an observational study Mister, Hamburg and Milner group and I can present you here the short term results. We looked at 80 patients in prospective or retro prospective manner with the t-branch as instructed for use.

Majority were aneurysms with the type two or type four Crawford tracheal aneurysms, also a few with symptomatic or ruptured cases. Patient characteristics of course, we have the same of the usual high risk cardiovascular profiling,

this group of patients that has been treated. Majority was performed percutaneously in 55%. The procedure time shows us that there is still a learning curve. I think nowadays we can perform this under 200 minutes. What is the outcome?

We have one patient who died post operative day 30, after experiencing multiorgan failure. These are 30 day results. No rupture or conversion to open surgery. We had one patient with cardiac ischemia, seven patients with spinal cord ischemia

and one patient has early branch occlusion. There was both renal arteries were occluded, he had an unknown heparin induced thrombocytopenia and was treated with endovascular thrombectomy and successfully treated as well. Secondary interventions within 30 days were in one patient

stent placement due to an uncovered celiac stent stenosis In one patient there was a proximal type one endoleak with a proximal extension. One patient who had paraplegia or paraparesis, he had a stenosis of his internal iliac artery which stem was stented successfully,

and the paraparesis resolved later on in this patient. And of course the patient I just mentioned before, with his left and right renal artery occlusion. So to conclude, the T-branch has wide applicability as we've seen also before, up to 80% especially with adjuvant procedures.

Longer, more flexible bridging stent grafts will expand the use of this device. Also the TBE proximal extensions allows aortic treatment of diameters for more than 30 mm and I think the limitations are still the diameter at reno visceral segment,

previous EVAR or open AAA repair and having of course multiple visceral arteries. Thank you.

- Thanks Bill and I thank Dr. Veith and the organizers of the session for the invitation to speak on histology of in-stent stenosis. These are my disclosures. Question, why bother with biopsy? It's kind of a hassle. What I want to do is present at first

before I show some of our classification of this in data, is start with this case where the biopsy becomes relevant in managing the patient. This is a 41 year old woman who was referred to us after symptom recurrence two months following left iliac vein stenting for post-thrombotic syndrome.

We performed a venogram and you can see this overlapping nitinol stents extending from the..., close to the Iliocaval Confluence down into Common Femoral and perhaps Deep Femoral vein. You can see on the venogram, that it is large displacement of the contrast column

from the edge of the stent on both sides. So we would call this sort of diffuse severe in-stent stenosis. We biopsy this material, you can see it's quite cellular. And in the classification, Doctor Gordon, our pathologist, applies to all these.

Consisted of fresh thrombus, about 15% of the sample, organizing thrombus about zero percent, old thrombus, which is basically a cellular fibrin, zero percent and diffuse intimal thickening - 85%. And you can see there is some evidence of a vascularisation here, as well as some hemosiderin deposit,

which, sort of, implies a red blood cell thrombus, histology or ancestry of this tissue. So, because the biopsy was grossly and histolo..., primarily grossly, we didn't have the histology to time, we judged that thrombolysis had little to offer this patient The stents were angioplastied

and re-lined with Wallstents this time. So, this is the AP view, showing two layers of stents. You can see the original nitinol stent on the outside, and a Wallstent extending from here. Followed venogram, venogram at the end of the procedure, shows that this displacement, and this is the maximal

amount we could inflate the Wallstent, following placement through this in-stent stenosis. And this is, you know, would be nice to have a biological or drug solution for this kind of in-stent stenosis. We brought her back about four months later, usually I bring them back at six months,

but because of the in-stent stenosis and suspecting something going on, we brought her back four months later, and here you can see that the gap between the nitinol stent and the outside the wall stent here. Now, in the contrast column, you can see that again, the contrast column is displaced

from the edge of the Wallstent, so we have recurrent in-stent stenosis here. The gross appearance of this clot was red, red-black, which suggests recent thrombus despite anticoagulation and the platelet. And, sure enough, the biopsy of fresh thrombus was 20%,

organizing thrombus-75%. Again, the old thrombus, zero percent, and, this time, diffuse intimal thickening of five percent. This closeup of some of that showing the cells, sort of invading this thrombus and starting organization. So, medical compliance and outflow in this patient into IVC

seemed acceptable, so we proceeded to doing ascending venogram to see what the outflow is like and to see, if she was an atomic candidate for recanalization. You can see these post-thrombotic changes in the popliteal vein, occlusion of the femoral vein.

You can see great stuffiness approaching these overlapping stents, but then you can see that the superficial system has been sequestered from the deep system, and now the superficial system is draining across midline. So, we planned to bring her back for recanalization.

So biopsy one with diffuse intimal thickening was used to forego thrombolysis and proceed with PTA and lining. Biopsy two was used to justify the ascending venogram. We find biopsy as a useful tool, making practical decisions. And Doctor Gordon at our place has been classifying these

biopsies in therms of: Fresh Thrombus, Organizing Thrombus, Old Thrombus and Diffuse Intimal thickening. These are panels on the side showing the samples of each of these classifications and timelines. Here is a timeline of ...

Organizing Thrombus here. To see it's pretty uniform series of followup period For Diffuse Intimal thickening, beginning shortly after the procedure, You won't see very much at all, increases with time. So, Fresh Thrombus appears to be

most prevalent in early days. Organizing Thrombus can be seen at early time points sample, as well as throughout the in-stent stenosis. Old Thrombus, which is a sort of a mystery to me why one pathway would be Old Thrombus and the other Diffuse Intimal thickening.

We have to work that out, I hope. Calcification is generally a very late feature in this process. Thank you very much.

- Now I want to talk about, as Chrissy mentioned AVM Classification System and it's treatment implication to achieve cure. How do I put forward? Okay, no disclosures. So there are already AVM Classification Systems. One is the well-known Houdart classification

for CNS lesions, and the other one is quite similar to the description to the Houdart lesion, the Cho Do classification of peripheral AVM's. But what do we expect from a good classification system? We expect that it gives us also a guide how to treat with a high rate of cure,

also for complex lesions. So the Yakes Classification System was introduced in 2014, and it's basically a further refinement of the previous classification systems, but it adds other features. As for example, a new description of

a new entity, Type IV AVM's with a new angioarchitecture, it defines the nidus, and especially a value is that it shows you the treatment strategy that should be applied according to angioarchitecture to treat the lesion. It's based on the use of ethanol and coils,

and it's also based on the long experience of his describer, Wayne Yakes. So the Yakes Classification System is also applicable to the very complex lesions, and we start with the Type I AVM, which is the most simple, direct

arterial to venous connection without nidus. So Type I is the simplest lesion and it's very common in the lung or in the kidney. Here we have a Type I AVM come from the aortic bifurcation draining into the paralumbar venous plexus,

and to get access, selective cauterization of the AVM is needed to define the transition point from the arterial side to the venous side, and to treat. So what is the approach to treat this? It's basically a mechanical approach, occluding

the lesion and the transition point, using mechanical devices, which can be coils or also other devices. For example, plugs or balloons. In small lesions, it can also be occluded using ethanol, but to mainly in larger lesions,

mechanical devices are needed for cure. Type II is the common and typical AVM which describes nidus, which comes from

multiple in-flow arteries and is drained by multiple veins. So this structure, as you can see here, can be, very, very dense, with multiple tangled fistulaes. And the way to break this AVM down is mainly that you get more selective views, so you want to get selective views

on the separate compartments to treat. So what are the treatment options? As you can see here, this is a very selective view of one compartment, and this can be treated using ethanol, which can be applied

by a superselective transcatheter arterial approach, where you try to get as far as possible to the nidus. Or if tangled vessels are not allowing transcatheter access, direct puncture of the feeding arteries immediately proximal to the nidus can be done to apply ethanol. What is the difference between Type IIa and IIb?

IIb has the same in-flow pattern as Type a, but it has a different out-flow pattern, with a large vein aneurysm. It's crucial to distinguish that the nidus precedes this venous aneurysm. So here you can see a nice example for Type IIb AVM.

This is a preview of the pelvis, we can here now see, in a lateral view, that the nidus fills the vein aneurysm and precedes this venous aneurysm. So how can this lesion be accessed? Of course, direct puncture is a safe way

to detect the lesion from the venous side. So blocking the outflow with coils, and possibly also ethanol after the flow is reduced to reflux into the fistulaes. It's a safe approach from the venous side for these large vein aneurysm lesions,

but also superselective transcatheter arterial approach to the nidus is able to achieve cure by placing ethanol into the nidus, but has to be directly in front of the nidus to spare nutrient arteries.

Type IIIa has also multiple in-flow arteries, but the nidus is inside the vein aneurysm wall. So the nidus doesn't precede the lesion, but it's in the vein wall. So where should this AVM be treated?

And you can see a very nice example here. This is a Type IIIa with a single out-flow vein, of the aneurysm vein, and this is a direct puncture of the vein, and you can see quite well that this vein aneurysm has just one single out-flow. So by blocking this out-flow vein,

the nidus is blocked too. Also ethanol can be applied after the flow was reduced again to reflux into the fistulas inside the vein aneurysm wall. And here you can see that by packing a dense packing with coils, the lesion is cured.

So direct puncture again from the venous side in this venous aneurysm venous predominant lesion. Type IIIb, the difference here is again, the out-flow pattern. So we have multiple in-flow arteries, the fistulaes are again in the vein aneurysm.

Which makes it even more difficult to treat this lesion, is that it has multiple out-flow veins and the nidus can also precede into these or move into these out-flow veins. So the dense packing of the aneurysm might have to be extended into the out-flow veins.

So what you can see here is an example. Again you need a more selective view, but you can already see the vein aneurysm, which can be targeted by direct puncture. And again here, the system applies. Placing coils and dense packing of the vein aneurysm,

and possibly also of the out-flow veins, can cure the lesion. This is the angiogram showing cure of this complex AVM IIIb. Type IV is a very new entity which was not described

in any other classification system as of yet. So what is so special about this Type IV AVM is it has multiple arteries and arterioles that form innumerable AV fistulaes, but these fistulaes infiltrate the tissue. And I'm going to specify this entity in a separate talk,

so I'm not going too much into details here. But treatment strategy of course, is also direct puncture here, and in case possible to achieve transarterial access very close to the nidus transarterial approach is also possible. But there are specific considerations, for example

50/50 mixture of alcohol, I'm going to specify this in a later talk. And here you can see some examples of this micro-fistulae in Type IV AVM infiltrative type. This is a new entity described. So the conclusion is that the Yakes Classification System

is based on the angioarchitecture of AVM's and on hemodynamic features. So it offers you a clear definition here the nidus is located, and where to deliver alcohol in a safe way to cure even complex AVM's.

Thank you very much.

[Speaker] - Thank you very much and I appreciate the ability to present some of our research. First off, some of this was supported by AHRQ we're going to go through. What's important is, I think, Hyperglycemia is underestimated and It's been shown in general surgery to be a marker of poor clinical outcomes

in a variety of surgical patients. When you look at post-operative Hyperglycemia, it's been studied in general surgery and cardiac surgery. It's been associated with mortality and the surgical site infection. But there really is a limited amount of data

within the vascular information. So, in general, you look at the general surgery, majority of literature shows it has increased risk of infection, it has increased risk of a reoperative surgery, as well as increased risk of death. So we decided we would look at patients

undergoing lower extremity bypasses, open and Endo. And we found that in this study, one in five patients undergoing vascular procedures have hyperglycemia in their postoperative period. And, what was interesting is that diabetes was not an indicator for poor outcomes.

To do this we used the American Association of Endocrinology guidelines, which suggested optimal glucose would be between 80 and 180. Greater than 180 would be considered suboptimal. We then used Cerner information, which is EMR data. We divided the patients between open and endovascular

surgeries. We looked at our glucose targets and we looked at our outcomes. So I think what's most important is we looked at 4,000 patients. Mean years were 67 years in age. But what's more important to actually notice is that hyperglycemia was common,

more common in younger than old. It had an ethnic variability where African-Americans were likely to have hyperglycemia. But still, one in five patients after a lower extremity intervention, open or Endo, had hyperglycemia. So we're really not paying attention to it.

You can see that it occurred in equal percentages within open and endovascular surgery. And when you do a multi-vari logistic regression, we found that hyperglycemia, you had 1.3 times more likely risk of infection during your stay. You have a higher risk length of stay.

You had almost eight times greater risk of death. So, actually what's interesting is that diabetes was found to be productive, which suggests that it's really not diabetes, it's actually hyperglycemia is the main driver. As well, we found that certain medications will increase your hyperglycemia,as well as your disease severity.

We then move through this, we say that one in five patients have hyperglycemia. It's associated with increased lower extremity complications ,increased length of stay, as well as increased mortality. It was actually also unexpected that diabetes was not associated with inferior outcomes

and it's suggested it actually may be a marker with or without diabetic patients. We then looked at hyperglycemia in general surgery patients. We wanted to find out there was a risk in infection, as it's been shown. The general surgery population has thought

that maybe hyperglycemia is the most important risk factor for surgical site infection. We then looked at readmission of patients that underwent lower extremity bypass, to see why they were coming back. We found and infection at the index diagnosis was most significant for having a chance of readmission.

As well as anemia was highly also correlated with readmission. So, infection certainly is an important component to readmission. As well as Hyperglycemia is associated with readmission. It's important to remember that of the patients that come back for readmission after lower extremity procedures, almost half

of the lower extremity bypass procedures were associated with and infectious complication. And finally predictors of readmission, would include Hyperglycemia as it was associated with increased risk of infection at the index study. We then also wanted to see, other patients other studies

have looked to see if it can be controlled. This actually was a nice study, which is a perspective or analyzed study looking at insulin infusion protocol to improve outcomes. They show that surgical site infection was not reduced, they did well to look and see if they could control Hyperglycemia events

with an infrarenal bypass and open surgical repairs. And they used similar metrics for their Optimal Glycemic Control values. This study actually shows which is most interesting, that the most difficult patients to control were the patients with diabetes and the patients undergoing lower extremity bypass.

But they did show that by increasing glucose control, patients had lower rates of, lower lengths of stay. As well as had lower overall costs. So moving along we then looked at AAA. One in six patients who had undergone endovascular repair and open repair of AAA had hyperglycemia.

And we also did not find diabetes reported or predicted for outcome. We found that infections complications were significantly higher if you had postoperative hyperglycemia. Even in endovascular surgery 1.8 times is more likely. We also found diabetes not to be a factor.

So it's obviously more complex than diabetes. Once again mortality was also associated with hyperglycemia after open AAA and endovascular AAA. And we can see again that diabetes was not really playing a role. So AAA, increased mortality is associated with postoperative hyperglycemia.

If you have an EVAR it's 8 times more likely to have mortality. The diabetes was actually somewhat protective. And postoperative hyperglycemia is associated with infectious complications and increased length of stay. There's been suggestion hyperglycemia may be associated with stroke. We looked at this information,

we basically found that the crude rates of stroke were significantly greater for patients with hyperglycemia. We then did a regression analysis to evaluate. We found that stenting actually had a risk of stroke, but hyperglycemia as well also had a higher risk of stroke on this study. And once again diabetes

was not associated. So you can see after hyperglycemia with carotid studies, actually 1 in 7 after elective carotid procedures had hyperglycemia. And they were 8 times more likely to have mortality. 1 point times 7 more likely to have a stroke. So in conclusion, this study actually showed

that you can by involving glycemic control can be managed by using a management service. So you can be improved. This is by Goodney. In conclusion, hyperglycemia is a modifiable event. Postoperative hyperglycemia is very common in vascular surgery population. Between 1 in 5 after lower extremity to 1 in 7 after

elective carotid repair. That actually diabetes was not really the main associated or driver for hyperglycemia. We associate it with infection, length of stay and mortality. And regardless of etiology it can associate with mortality and inferior outcomes. Patients undergoing vascular surgery need

to have hyperglycemic management. And this evidence suggests this may decrease infections as well as complications and mortality. Thank you very much.

- I'd like to share with you our experience using tools to improve outcomes. These are my disclosures. So first of all we need to define the anatomy well using CTA and MRA and with using multiple reformats and 3D reconstructions. So then we can use 3D fusion with a DSA or with a flouro

or in this case as I showed in my presentation before you can use a DSA fused with a CT phase, they were required before. And also you can use the Integrated Registration like this, when you can use very helpful for the RF wire

because you can see where the RF wire starts and the snare ends. We can also use this for the arterial system. I can see a high grade stenosis in the Common iliac and you can use the 3D to define for your 3D roadmapping you can use on the table,

or you can use two methods to define the artery. Usually you can use the yellow outline to define the anatomy or the green to define the center. And then it's a simple case, 50 minutes, 50 minutes of ccs of contrast,

very simple, straightforward. Another everybody knows about the you know we can use a small amount of contrast to define the whole anatomy of one leg. However one thing that is relatively new is to use a 3D

in order to map, to show you the way out so you can do in this case here multiple segmental synosis, the drug-eluting-balloon angioplasty using the 3D roadmap as a reference. Also about this case using radial fre--

radial access to peripheral. Using a fusion of image you can see the outline of the artery. You can see where the high grade stenosis is with a minimum amount of contrast. You only use contrast when you are about

to do your angiogram or your angioplasty and after. And that but all everything else you use only the guide wires and cathers are advanced only used in image guidance without any contrast at all. We also been doing as I showed before the simultaneous injection.

So here I have two catheters, one coming from above, one coming from below to define this intravenous occlusion. Very helpful during through the and after the 3D it can be helpful. Like in this case when you can see this orange line is where

the RF wire is going to be advanced. As you can see the breathing, during the breathing cycle the pleura is on the way of the RF wire track. Pretty dangerous stuff. So this case what we did we asked the anesthesiologist

to have the patient in respiratory breath holding inspiration. We're able to hyperextend the lungs, cross with the RF wire without any complication. So very useful. And also you can use this outline yellow lines here

to define anatomy can help you to define where you need to put the stents. Make sure you're covering everything and having better outcomes at the end of the case without overexposure of radiation. And also at the end you can use the same volt of metric

reconstruction to check where you are, to placement of the stent and if you'd covered all the lesion that you had. The Cone beam CT can be used for also for the 3D model fusion. As you can see that you can use in it with fluoro as I

mentioned before you can do the three views in order to make sure that the vessels are aligned. And those are they follow when you rotate the table. And then you can have a pretty good outcome at the end of the day at of the case. In that case that potentially could be very catastrophic

close to the Supra aortic vessels. What about this case of a very dramatic, symptomatic varicose veins. We didn't know and didn't even know where to start in this case. We're trying to find our way through here trying to

understand what we needed to do. I thought we need to recanalize this with this. Did a 3D recan-- a spin and we saw ours totally off. This is the RFY totally interior and the snare as a target was posterior in the ASGUS.

Totally different, different plans. Eventually we found where we needed to be. We fused with the CAT scan, CT phase before, found the right spot and then were able to use

Integrated registration for the careful recanalization above the strip-- interiorly from the Supraaortic vessels. As you can see that's the beginning, that's the end. And also these was important to show us where we working.

We working a very small space between the sternal and the Supraaortic vessels using the RF wire. And this the only technology would allowed us to do this type of thing. Basically we created a percutaneous in the vascular stent bypass graft.

You can you see you use a curved RF wire to be able to go back to the snare. And that once we snare out is just conventional angioplasty recanalized with covered stents and pretty good outcome. On a year and a half follow-up remarkable improvement in this patient's symptoms.

Another patient with a large graft in the large swelling thigh, maybe graft on the right thigh with associated occlusion of the iliac veins and inclusion of the IVC and occlusion of the filter. So we did here is that we fused the maps of the arterial

phase and the venous phase and then we reconstruct in a 3D model. And doing that we're able to really understand the beginning of the problem and the end of the problem above the filter and the correlation with the arteries. So as you can see,

the these was very tortuous segments. We need to cross with the RF wire close to the iliac veins and then to the External iliac artery close to the Common iliac artery. But eventually we were able to help find a track. Very successfully,

very safe and then it's just convention technique. We reconstructed with covered stents. This is predisposed, pretty good outcome. As you can see this is the CT before, that's the CT after the swelling's totally gone

and the stents are widely open. So in conclusion these techniques can help a reduction of radiation exposure, volume of contrast media, lower complication, lower procedure time.

In other words can offer higher value in patient care. Thank you.

- These are my disclosures. So aortic neck dilatation is not a new problem. It's been described even before the era of endovascular repair and it's estimated to occur in about 20% of all patients that undergo EVAR two years after the index procedure.

We're seeing more and more cases where patients that survive long enough after EVAR, they develop aortic neck dilatation beyond the nominal diameter of the endograft and like on this patient, this image, large type 1A endoleaks that are difficult to treat.

There's a number of factors that are contributing to aortic neck dilatation including a continuous outward force that is exerted by the endograft. Progression of aortic wall degeneration. Aneurisymal disease is a degenerative procedure.

The presence of endoleaks, particularly type two endoleaks have been implicated in aortic neck dilatation. And then incomplete seal at the proximal neck in the form of microleaks or positional leaks. HeliFX EndoAnchors as you heard were

designed to stabilize and improve the apposition of the endograft to the aortic neck. And as you saw on this video, their presence even when the super no fixation disengages from the wall of the aorta, may help stabilize the graft onto

the aorta and prevent type 1A endoleaks. About three or four years ago we started looking at the anchor registry data, trying to identify predictors of aortic neck dilatation in patients who are undergoing EVAR with EndoAnchors. We published those results about a year ago.

In terms of the one year mark, we had 267 patients in that cohort. We measured the aortic diameter at four different levels. 20 millimeters proximal to the lowest main renal artery and then at the level of the lowest renal artery, five and 10 millimeters distal to that.

We defined the change in diameter that occurred between the pre-implantation EVAR and the first post-implantation EVAR at about one month. As adoptive enlargement due mainly to the effect of endograaft and the interaction with the aortic wall.

And then we defined this dilatation, what occurred between the one month and the 12 month mark, post EVAR. We used 20 different variables and we ran all these variables at the three levels. And what we found in terms of

post-operative neck dilatation is that it occurred in 3.1% of patients at the level of the lowest renal artery. 7.7% five millimeters distal to it and 4.6% at 10 millimeters distal to it. And this is a dilatation with a threshold

of at least three millimeters. We felt that this was much more clinically relevant. In terms of protective factors for adaptive enlargement, the presence of calcium and the aortic diameter of the level of the lowest renal, both of these are easy to understand.

The stiffer the aorta, the lesser the degree of the immediate dilatation. But then when we looked at the true dilatation, we found out that the aortic neck diameter at the lowest renal artery was a significant risk factor as was Endograft oversizing.

So if you started with a large aorta to begin with, these patients were much more likely to develop neck dilatation and if you significantly oversize the endograft that was also an independent risk factor. On the other hand, the neck length as well as the number of EndoAnchors that

were placed in these patients, both appear to have independent protective effects. So the two year preliminary analysis results is what I'm going to present. The analysis is still ongoing, but now we have a larger number of patients, 674.

We performed the same measurements at the same levels. What we found in terms of time course and location of the aortic neck dilatation is that in the suprarenal site, there is negligible dilatation up to 24 months. The largest dilatation occurs at five millimeters,

but more interestingly, a significant number of patients did not even have endograft present in that location. And then at 10 millimeters distal to the lowest renal artery right where most of the aneurysm changes you would expect to occur,

that change in diameter was again negligible. Indirectly suggesting that EndoAnchors have protective effect. So these are our interesting, some interesting insights. Female sex and graft oversize do play a significant role in the post-operative neck dilatation.

With EndoAnchors implanted at the index procedure neck dilatation 10 millimeters distal to the lowest renal artery appears to be negligible both at 12 and at 24 months. But we're working to see a little bit more finer elements at this analysis.

As where exactly the EndoAnchors were placed and how this was associated with the changes in the aortic neck. We hope to have those results later this year. Thank you.

- Thanks Fieres. Thank you very much for attending this session and Frank for the invitation. These are my disclosures. We have recently presented the outcomes of the first 250 patients included in this prospective IDE at the AATS meeting in this hotel a few months ago.

In this study, there was no in-hospital mortality, there was one 30-day death. This was a death from a patient that had intracranial hemorrhage from the spinal drain placement that eventually was dismissed to palliative care

and died on postoperative day 22. You also note that there are three patients with paraplegia in this study, one of which actually had a epidural hematoma that was led to various significant and flacid paralysis. That prompted us to review the literature

and alter our outcomes with spinal drainage. This review, which includes over 4700 patients shows that the average rate of complications is 10%, some of those are relatively moderate or minor, but you can see a rate of intracranial hemorrhage of 1.5% and spinal hematoma of 1% in this large review,

which is essentially a retrospective review. We have then audited our IDE patients, 293 consecutive patients treated since 2013. We looked at all their spinal drains, so there were 240 placement of drains in 187 patients. You can see that some of these were first stage procedures

and then the majority of them were the index fenestrated branch procedure and some, a minority were Temporary Aneurysm Sac Perfusions. Our rate of complication was identical to the review, 10% and I want to point out some of the more important complications.

You can see here that intracranial hypotension occurred in 6% of the patients, that included three patients, or 2%, with intracranial hemorrhage and nine patients, or 5%, with severe headache that prolonged hospital stay and required blood patch for management.

There were also six patients with spinal hematomas for a overall rate of 3%, including the patient that I'll further discuss later. And one death, which was attributed to the spinal drain. When we looked at the intracranial hypotension in these 12 patients, you can see

the median duration of headache was four days, it required narcotics in seven patients, blood patch in five patients. All these patients had prolonged hospital stay, in one case, the prolongation of hospital stay was of 10 days.

Intracranial hemorrhage in three patients, including the patient that I already discussed. This patient had a severe intracranial hemorrhage which led to a deep coma. The patient was basically elected by the family to be managed with palliative care.

This patient end up expiring on postoperative day 21. There were other two patients with intracranial hemorrhage, one remote, I don't think that that was necessarily related to the spinal drain, nonetheless we had it on this review. These are some of the CT heads of the patients that had intracranial hemorrhage,

including the patient that passed away, which is outlined in the far left of your slide. Six patients had spinal hematoma, one of these patients was a patient, a young patient treated for chronic dissection. Patient evolved exceptionally well, moving the legs,

drain was removed on postoperative day two. As the patient is standed out of the bed, felt weakness in the legs, we then imaged the spine. You can see here, very severe spinal hematoma. Neurosurgery was consulted, decided to evacuate, the patient woke up with flacid paralysis

which has not recovered. There were two other patients with, another patient with paraplegia which was treated conservatively and improved to paraparesis and continues to improve and two other patients with paraparesis.

That prompted changes in our protocol. We eliminated spinal drains for Extent IVs, we eliminated for chronic dissection, in first stages, on any first stage, and most of the Extent IIIs, we also changed our protocol of drainage

from the routine drainage of a 10 centimeters of water for 15 minutes of the hours to a maximum of 20 mL to a drainage that's now guided by Near Infrared Spectroscopy, changes or symptoms. This is our protocol and I'll illustrate how we used this in one patient.

This is a patient that actually had this actual, exact anatomy. You can see the arch was very difficult, the celiac axis was patent and provided collateral flow an occluded SMA. The right renal artery was chronically occluded.

As we were doing this case the patient experienced severe changes in MEP despite the fact we had flow to the legs, we immediately stopped the procedure with still flow to the aneurysm sac. The patient develops pancreatitis, requires dialysis

and recovers after a few days in the ICU with no neurological change. Then I completed the repair doing a subcostal incision elongating the celiac axis and retrograde axis to this graft to complete the branch was very difficult to from the arm

and the patient recovered with no injury. So, in conclusion, spinal drainage is potentially dangerous even lethal and should be carefully weighted against the potential benefits. I think that our protocol now uses routine drainage for Extent I and IIs,

although I still think there is room for a prospective randomized trial even on this group and selective drainage for Extent IIIs and no drainage for Extent IVs. We use NIRS liberally to guide drainage and we use temporary sac perfusion

in those that have changes in neuromonitoring. Thank you very much.

- The only disclosure is the device I'm about to talk to you about this morning, is investigation in the United States. What we can say about Arch Branch Technology is it is not novel or particularly new. Hundreds of these procedures have been performed worldwide, most of the experiences have been dominated by a cook device

and the Terumo-Aortic formerly known as Bolton Medical devices. There is mattering of other experience through Medtronic and Gore devices. As of July of 2018 over 340 device implants have been performed,

and this series has been dominated by the dual branch device but actually three branch constructions have been performed in 25 cases. For the Terumo-Aortic Arch Branch device the experience is slightly less but still significant over 160 device implants have been performed as of November of this year.

A small number of single branch and large majority of 150 cases of the double branch repairs and only two cases of the three branch repairs both of them, I will discuss today and I performed. The Aortic 3-branch Arch Devices is based on the relay MBS platform with two antegrade branches and

a third retrograde branch which is not illustrated here, pointing downwards towards descending thoracic Aorta. The first case is a 59 year old intensivist who presented to me in 2009 with uncomplicated type B aortic dissection. This was being medically managed until 2014 when he sustained a second dissection at this time.

An acute ruptured type A dissection and sustaining emergent repair with an ascending graft. Serial imaging shortly thereafter demonstrated a very rapid growth of the Distal arch to 5.7 cm. This is side by side comparison of the pre type A dissection and the post type A repair dissection.

What you can see is the enlargement of the distal arch and especially the complex septal anatomy that has transformed as initial type B dissection after the type A repair. So, under FDA Compassion Use provision, as well as other other regulatory conditions

that had to be met. A Terumo or formerly Bolton, Aortic 3-branch Arch Branch device was constructed and in December 2014 this was performed. As you can see in this illustration, the two antegrade branches and a third branch

pointing this way for the for the left subclavian artery. And this is the images, the pre-deployment, post-deployment, and the three branches being inserted. At the one month follow up you can see the three arch branches widely patent and complete thrombosis of the

proximal dissection. Approximately a year later he presented with some symptoms of mild claudication and significant left and right arm gradient. What we noted on the CT Angiogram was there was a kink in the participially

supported segment of the mid portion of this 3-branch graft. There was also progressive enlargement of the distal thoracoabdominal segment. Our plan was to perform the, to repair the proximal segment with a custom made cuff as well as repair the thoracoabdominal segment

with this cook CMD thoracoabdominal device. As a 4 year follow up he's working full time. He's arm pressures are symmetric. Serum creatinine is normal. Complete false lumen thrombosis. All arch branches patent.

The second case I'll go over really quickly. 68 year old man, again with acute type A dissection. 6.1 cm aortic arch. Initial plan was a left carotid-subclavian bypass with a TEVAR using a chimney technique. We changed that plan to employ a 3-branch branch repair.

Can you advance this? And you can see this photo. In this particular case because the pre-operative left carotid-subclavian bypass and the extension of the dissection in to the innominate artery we elected to...

utilize the two antegrade branches for the bi-lateral carotid branches and actually utilize the downgoing branch through the- for the right subclavian artery for later access to the thoracoabdominal aorta. On post op day one once again he presented with

an affective co arctation secondary to a kink within the previous surgical graft, sustaining a secondary intervention and a placement of a balloon expandable stent. Current status. On Unfortunately the result is not as fortunate

as the first case. In 15 months he presented with recurrent fevers, multi-focal CVAs from septic emboli. Essentially bacteria endocarditis and he was deemed inoperable and he died. So in conclusion.

Repair of complex arch pathologies is feasible with the 3-branch Relay arch branch device. Experience obviously is very limited. Proper patient selection important. And the third antegrade branch is useful for later thoracoabdominal access.

Thank you.

- [Professor Veith] Laura, Welcome. - Thank you Professor Veith, thank you to everybody and good morning. It's a great pleasure, to have the possibility to present the result of this randomized trial we performed near Rome in Italy.

Risk of CAS-related embolism was maximal during the first phases of the second procedure, the filter positioning predilation and deployment and post dilatation. But it continues over time with nithinol expansion so that we have an interaction between the stent struts

and the plaque that can last up to 28 or 30 days that is the so called plaque healing period. This is why over time different technique and devices have been developed in order to keep to a minimum the rate of perioperative neurological embolization.

This is why we have, nowadays, membrane-covered stent or mesh-covered stent. But a question we have to answer, in our days are, "are mesh covered stents able to capture every kind of embolism?" Even the off-table one.

This is why they have been designed. That is to say the embolism that occurs after the patient has left the operating room. This is why we started this randomized trial with the aim of comparing the rate of off-table subclinical neurological events

in two groups of patients submitted to CAS with CGuard or WALLSTENT and distal embolic protection device in all of them. We enrolled patient affected by asymptomatic carotid stenosis more than 70% and no previous brain ischemic lesion

detected at preoperative DW-MRI. The primary outcome was the rate of perioperative up to 72 hour post peri operatively in neurological ischemic events detected by DW-MRI in the two CAS group. And secondary outcome measure were the rise of (mumbles)

neuro biomarker as one on the better protein in NSE and the variation in post procedural mini mental state examination test in MoCA test score We enrolled 29 patients for each treatment group. The study protocol was composed by a preoperative DW-MRI and neuro psychometrics test assessment

and the assessment of blood levels of this two neuro biomarkers. Then, after the CAS procedure, we performed an immediate postoperative DW-MRI, we collect this sample up to 48 hours post operatively to assess the level of the neuro biomarkers

then assess 72 hour postoperatively we perform a new DW-MRI and a new assessment of neuro psychometric tests. 58 patient were randomized 29 per group. And we found one minor stroke in the CGuard group together with eight clinically silent lesion detected at 72 hours DW-MRI.

Seven patient presented in WALLSTENT group silent 72 DW-MRI lesion were no difference between the two groups but interestingly two patients presented immediately postoperatively DW-MRI lesions. Those lesion were no more detectable at 72 hours

this give doubts to what we are going to see with DW-MRI. When analyzing the side of the lesion, we found four ipsilateral lesion in the CGuard patient and four contra or bilateral lesion in this group while four ipsilateral were encountered in WALLSTENT patient and three contra or bilateral lesion

in the WALLSTENT group were no difference between the two groups. And as for the diameter of the lesion, there were incomparable in the two groups but more than five lesion were found in five CGuard patients, three WALLSTENT patient

with no significant difference within the two groups. A rise doubled of S1 of the better protein was observed at 48 hours in 24 patients, 12 of them presenting new DW-MRI lesions. And this was statistically significant when comparing the 48 level with the bars of one.

When comparing results between the two groups for the tests, we found for pre and post for MMSE and MoCA test no significant difference even if WALLSTENT patients presented better MoCA test post operatively and no significant difference for the postoperative score for both the neuro psychometric test between the two groups.

But when splitting patients not according to the treatment group but according to the presence of more or less than 5 lesion at DW-MRI, we found a significant difference in the postoperative score for both MMSE and MoCA test between both group pf patients.

To conclude, WALLSTENT and CGuard stent showed that not significant differences in micro embolism rate or micro emboli number at 72 postoperative hours DW-MRI, in our experience. 72 hour DW-MMRI lesion were associated to an increase in neuro biomarkers

and more than five lesion were significantly associated to a decrease in neuro psychometric postoperative score in both stent groups. But a not negligible number of bilateral or contralateral lesions were detected in both stent groups This is very important.

This is why, probably, (mumbles) are right when they show us what really happened into the arch when we perform a transfer more CAS and this is why, maybe,

the future can be to completely avoid the arch. I thank you for your attention.

- Thank you very much for having me speak and thank you for coming this late in the day for this talk. These are my disclosures. This is our current operating system with advanced imaging and this is GE Discovery IGS 740. You can see you have fusion imaging,

you have the capacity to use combined CT. What I would like to talk to you today is about how we were significantly decrease radiation over the years. What you are seeing on this graph is my personal volume of endovascular cases. In the solid bullets you've the number of fenestrated cases

which have steadily increased over the years and in the empty rounds you've the number of any endovascular case. So what this is saying is that I am doing more fenestrated than more standard endovascular cases. And nowadays these cases are becoming more complex.

You're seeing here the number of vessels incorporated went from 2.9 all the way to 3.7 per patient. Now, at the same time, I did get better over the years. You can see that the fluoroscopy time for the procedures declined after two or three years of experience but it plateaued in 2012.

So, basically, since 2012, I am not doing these cases any faster with any last fluoroscopy time. So any change in the operator or in the patient radiation exposure would be attributed to other factors but the technique. You can see here the effective dose over the years

has dramatically declined from system 1 to system 2 to now system 3 in the blue that is the GE Discovery system to approximately 1/3rd to 1/4th of our baseline dose in the first beginning of the experience. We also recorded the operator dose over the year and you can see here that my radiation dose

has significantly declined again to about 1/3rd to 1/4th of the beginning of the experience. So, how did we achieve this improvement? I will go for eight golden rules, first is doing your work ahead of time, finding out the ideal work positions, using and leveraging all preoperative cross-sectional

imaging that you've, numerous of speakers have already talked about that, our highlights the importance of lead shooting with the work of Dijon which has a thing being remarkable contribution to the understanding of this. Optimize the system geometry, I think is very important avoiding work with the detector too high, the table low

as the abstracted on these illustration or the opposite with the table too high and really finding your way to the optimal geometry. I am sorry I advanceed, the slide is wrong way. Using the ideal dose rate, you can see here that the ideal dose rate in most operators has been down

now to 7.5 frames per second, and in some systems even 3.75 frames per second. We tend to use 7.5, we found this to be the soft spot with our system. ONLAY fusion has been also an important aspect in terms of facilitating the procedure, you're seeing

a segment of a patient before chronic dissection where you're leveraging the fusion to find the septum of trolloming using a reentrance device and really minimizing the amount of contrast and minimizing fluoroscopy, finding your ideal work position or with the use of these landmark markings

than with the fusion. Finally, nice feature of the system is the digital zoom. We really rarely magnify. What you're seeing here is a basically, digitally zoom different than magnification, so that really has allowed us to keep the dose very low

coupled with the collimation. And I think, this is a nice feature. We really avoid using DSAs unless you've to interrogate vessel. It is important to remember that 1 DSA is equivalent to approximately 500 fluoroscopic look.

So, what you're seeing here is the interrogation of a left renal stent done with a fluoroscopic loop as opposed to DSA. And, that is again a very important aspect. Avoiding high angulations wave when you're working in the sma or the celiac axis, we actually tend to that often

with the AP as opposed to the lateral view as soon as you can, you kind of transfer the image to the AP view to minimize radiation. So, in summary, we came a long ways, in terms of standard and complex EVAR where living now in a narrate that we've better devices, we've cross sectional imaging and we've

advanced image and I think we need to leverage all these three aspects to minimize radiation. Thank you very much

- Good afternoon to everybody, this is my disclosure. Now our center we have some experience on critical hand ischemia in the last 20 years. We have published some papers, but despite the treatment of everyday, of food ischemia including hand ischemia is not so common. We had a maximum of 200 critical ischemic patients

the majority of them were patient with hemodialysis, then other patients with Buerger's, thoracic outlet syndrome, etcetera. And especially on hemodialysis patients, we concentrate on forearms because we have collected 132 critical ischemic hands.

And essentially, we can divide the pathophysiology of this ischemic. Three causes, first is that the big artery disease of the humeral and below the elbow arteries. The second cause is the small artery disease

of the hand and finger artery. And the third cause is the presence of an arterial fistula. But you can see, that in active ipsillateral arteriovenous fistula was present only 42% of these patients. And the vast majority of the patients

who had critical hand ischemia, there were more concomitant causes to obtain critical hand ischemia. What can we do in these types of patients? First, angioplasty. I want to present you this 50 years old male

with diabetes type 1 on hemodialysis, with previous history of two failed arteriovenous fistula for hemodialysis. The first one was in occluded proximal termino-lateral radiocephalic arteriovenous fistula. So, the radial artery is occluded.

The second one was in the distal latero-terminal arteriovenous fistula, still open but not functioning for hemodialysis. Then, we have a cause of critical hand ischemia, which is the occlusion of the ulnar artery. What to do in a patient like this?

First of all, we have treated this long occlusion of the ulnar artery with drug-coated ballooning. The second was treatment of this field, but still open arteriovenous fistula, embolized with coils. And this is the final result,

you can see how blood flow is going in this huge superficial palmar arch with complete resolution of the ischemia. And the patient obviously healed. The second thing we can do, but on very rarely is a bypass. So, this a patient with multiple gangrene amputations.

So, he came to our cath lab with an indication to the amputation of the hand. The radial artery is totally occluded, it's occluded here, the ulnar artery is totally occluded. I tried to open the radial artery, but I understood that in the past someone has done

a termino-terminal radio-cephalic arteriovenous fistula. So after cutting, the two ends of the radial artery was separated. So, we decided to do a bypass, I think that is one of the shortest bypass in the world. Generally, I'm not a vascular surgeon

but generally vascular surgeons fight for the longest bypass and not for the shortest one. I don't know if there is some race somewhere. The patient was obviously able to heal completely. Thoracic sympathectomy. I have not considered this option in the past,

but this was a patient that was very important for me. 47 years old female, multiple myeloma with amyloidosis. Everything was occluded, I was never able to see a vessel in the fingers. The first time I made this angioplasty,

I was very happy because the patient was happy, no more pain. We were able to amputate this finger. Everything was open after three months. But in the subsequent year, the situation was traumatic. Every four or five months,

every artery was totally occluded. So, I repeated a lot of angioplasty, lot of amputations. At the end it was impossible to continue. After four years, I decided to do something, or an amputation at the end. We tried to do endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy.

There is a very few number of this, or little to regard in this type of approach. But infected, no more pain, healing. And after six years, the patient is still completely asymptomatic. Unbelievable.

And finally, the renal transplant. 36 years old female, type one diabetes, hemodialysis. It was in 2009, I was absolutely embarrassed that I tried to do something in the limbs, inferior limbs in the hand.

Everything was calcified. At the end, we continued with fingers amputation, a Chopart amputation on one side and below the knee major amputation. Despite this dramatic clinical stage, she got a double kidney and pancreas transplant on 2010.

And then, she healed completely. Today she is 45 years old, this summer walking in the mountain. She sent to me a message, "the new leg prostheses are formidable". She's driving a car, totally independent,

active life, working. So, the transplant was able to stop this calcification, this small artery disease which was devastating. So, patients with critical high ischemia have different pathophysiology and different underlying diseases.

Don't give up and try to find for everyone the proper solution. Thank you very much for your attention.

- [Presenter] Thank you very much, Mr. Chairman, and ladies and gentlemen, and Frank Veith for this opportunity. Before I start my talk, actually, I can better sit down, because Hans and I worked together. We studied in the same city, we finished our medical study there, we also specialized in surgery

in the same city, we worked together at the same University Hospital, so what should I tell you? Anyway, the question is sac enlargement always benign has been answered. Can we always detect an endoleak, that is nice. No, because there are those hidden type II's,

but as Hans mentioned, there's also a I a and b, position dependent, possible. Hidden type III, fabric porosity, combination of the above. Detection, ladies and gentlemen, is limited by the tools we have, and CTA, even in the delayed phase

and Duplex-scan with contrast might not always be good enough to detect these lesions, these endoleaks. This looks like a nice paper, and what we tried to do is to use contrast-enhanced agents in combination with MRI. And here you see the pictures. And on the top you see the CTA, with contrast,

and also in the delayed phase. And below, you see this weak albumin contrast agent in an MRI and shows clearly where the leak is present. So without this tool, we were never able to detect an endoleak with the usual agents. So, at this moment, we don't know always whether contrast

in the Aneurysm Sac is only due to a type II. I think this is an important message that Hans pushed upon it. Detection is limited by the tools we have, but the choice and the success of the treatment is dependent on the kind of endoleak, let that be clear.

So this paper has been mentioned and is using not these advanced tools. It is only using very simple methods, so are they really detecting type II endoleaks, all of them. No, of course not, because it's not the golden standard. So, nevertheless, it has been published in the JVS,

it's totally worthless, from a scientific point of view. Skip it, don't read it. The clinical revelance of the type II endoleak. It's low pressure, Hans pointed it out. It works, also in ruptured aneurysms, but you have to be sure that the type II is the only cause

of Aneurysm Sac Expansion. So, is unlimited Sac Expansion harmless. I agree with Hans that it is not directly life threatening, but it ultimately can lead to dislodgement and widening of the neck and this will lead to an increasing risk for morbidity and even mortality.

So, the treatment of persistent type II in combination with Sac Expansion, and we will hear more about this during the rest of the session, is Selective Coil-Embolisation being preferred for a durable solution. I'm not so much a fan of filling the Sac, because as was shown by Stephan Haulan, we live below the dikes

and if we fill below the dikes behind the dikes, it's not the solution to prevent rupture, you have to put something in front of the dike, a Coil-Embolisation. So classic catheterisation of the SMA or Hypogastric, Trans Caval approach is now also popular,

and access from the distal stent-graft landing zone is our current favorite situation. Shows you quickly a movie where we go between the two stent-grafts in the iliacs, enter the Sac, and do the coiling. So, prevention of the type II during EVAR

might be a next step. Coil embolisation during EVAR has been shown, has been published. EVAS, is a lot of talks about this during this Veith meeting and the follow-up will tell us what is best. In conclusions, the approach to sac enlargement

without evident endoleak. I think unlimited Sac expansion is not harmless, even quality of life is involved. What should your patient do with an 11-centimeter bilp in his belly. Meticulous investigation of the cause of the Aneurysm Sac

Expansion is mandatory to achieve a, between quote, durable treatment, because follow-up is crucial to make that final conclusion. And unfortunately, after treatment, surveillance remains necessary in 2017, at least. And this is Hans Brinker, who put his finger in the dike,

to save our country from a type II endoleak, and I thank you for your attention.

- This is a little bit more detailed explanation of the pathophysiology behind Type IV AVM's. Medical disclosures are none. And this is the Yakes classification and this is Type IV lesion we are going to talk about now. So, this angioarchitecture has not been described before, and was first described in the Yakes classification.

What is so unique? It has multiple arteries, arterioles, but these arterioles form innumerable fistulas that are of a microsize, and they infiltrate the affected tissue. So, this is, this can affect every kind of tissue,

skin involvement and muscle involvement, and other than brain AVM, bleeding occurs if mucosa involvement is present or if an ulcer is present. So, we have to think about the definition of an AVM, which is an artery to vein connection

without an intervening capillary bed. But, what applies in Type IV? As you can see here, very nice example of this infiltrating type is that the tissue where the AVM is located is also viable, so the assumption is that

normal capillary beds are interspersed into these innumerable AVMs existing next to the malformed AVM fistulas, and this is a new definition of AVM. So, how to access this lesion? Of course, transarterial is possible

with a catheter or micro catheter. If anatomy doesn't allow transarterial approach, direct puncture is an option. Also, as you can see, in the direct puncture in the lower video, you can see the venus drainage of these fistulas,

and direct puncture of the vein compressed to reflux ethanol into the fistulas is also an approach. But, what is the challenge here? If you want to treat this lesion, you have to keep in mind

that you don't want to occlude the capillaries that are supplying the tissue. So, to find the right treatment approach, the physiologic concept is often important to understand that the arteriovenous fistulas drain into multiple veins and arterialize these veins

so we have a high pressure on this venus outflow site. The normal capillaries have a normal outflow too but this is of lower pressure, and this comes to competition between the arterialized veins and the normal venus outflow, which is, which is inferior to the normal capillary outflow.

So, what follows is a restriction of normal tissue flow with back-up to the capillaries, and backing up into the arterial inflow. So, we have the situation that the arterial venus fistulas have a lower pressure, lower resistance, and an increased arterial flow

compared to the normal capillaries, and this has to be taken into advantage for treatment. How can this be achieved? Thicken the fluid and dilute the ethanol by creating a mixture of 50/50 contrast and ethanol. So, this mixture will follow the preferential flow

into the arteriovenous fistulas in transarterial injections bearing the normal capillaries. So, if it's possible to puncture into the fistulas, pure ethanol can be used, but especially in transarterial access where normal nutrient vessels can be filled,

50:50 mixture contrast is the key to treat a Type IV AVM, Type IV Yates AVM, and here, you can see, using this approach, how this AVM can partly be treated in many several treatment sessions. And here you can see the clinical result. So, this huge ulcer, after seven treatments, healed

because of the less venus hypertension in the lesion. So the additional benefit of 50/50% ethanol contrast mixture is that your injection is visible on flouroscopy so you can see if which vessels you are including. You can react and adjust the pressure you're injecting. So, it also has to be considered

that the more you give diluted, the more total ethanol can be needed, but it's not efficient in larger vessels. This is also the advantage that you just treat the microfistulas. It's of importance that you use non-ionic contrast

as ionic contrast precipitates in the mixture. So here, you can see again, see the Type IV AVM of the arm and hand, which I already showed in my first talk, and here, you see the cured result after multiple sessions showing good arterial drum without fistulas remaining.

So, the conclusion is that Yakes Type IV is a new entity. It's crucial to understand the hemodynamics and the concept of 50/50 contrast ethanol mixture to treat this lesion with also a curative approach. Thank you very much.

- Good morning. Thank you Dr. Veith for this kind invitation to present our data. These are my disclosures. So despite multimodal strategies to improve spinal cord perfusion permanent paraplegia still occurs in up to ten percent of patients undergoing

complex thoracoabdominal procedures. And the rates of transient lower extremity weakness are even higher. Hyperglycemia is associated with worsened clinical outcomes after acute ischemic stroke, severe head injury and subarachnoid hemorrhage.

In experimental date in animal studies suggests that hyperglycemia may be deleterious in the setting of spinal cord ischemic injury, but human studies are lacking. We have previously shown that elevated blood and CSF glucose levels were significantly associated

with postoperative lower extremity weakness in patients undergoing multi-branched endovascular aortic aneurysm repair. And importantly these elevated glucose levels preceded the onset of lower extremity weakness. Based on the findings of this study, we initiated

an insulin infusion protocol to maintain postoperative glucose levels to less than 120 milligrams per deciliter in all patients undergoing MBEVAR. And the purpose of this current study was to determine whether using this insulin infusion protocol to achieve tight postoperative blood glucose control

decrease the rate of lower extremity weakness after MBEVAR. This was a single center prospective clinical trail of asymptomatic patients with thoracoabdominal or pararenal aneurysms who underwent MBEVAR. All patients were admitted one day prior to the procedure and treated with IV fluid hydration and their

antihypertensive medications were held peri-operatively. All of these patients underwent preoperative placement of a lumbar catheter for drainage of CSF. And in October of 2013 we began to collect blood and CSF samples on these patients for further analysis. In July of 2016 we began the insulin infusion protocol.

And in all patients who had a blood glucose level of greater than or equal to 120 milligrams per deciliter, they were started on a regular IV insulin infusion which was further titrated based on subsequent glucose measurements and then continued in the ICU for the first 48 hours postoperatively.

Between October of 2013 and April of 2018, 43 patients without pre-existing paraplegia underwent MBEVAR. The mean age of the cohort was 73 years and the majority were men. 19% of these patients had diabetes mellitus, but none of these patients were on insulin preoperatively.

53% of patients underwent treatment for either a type four or a pararenal aneurysm, but the proximal seal zone was in the superceliac aorta in all of these patients. Before initiation of the insulin infusion protocol 22 patients underwent MBEVAR, and after initiation of the insulin infusion protocol

21 patients underwent MBEVAR. There's no difference in demographic characteristics, comorbidity, or operative parameters between the two groups of patients. Before initiation of the insulin infusion protocol, seven of twenty-two patients developed

lower extremity weakness within the first 48 hours of repair. This was temporary in five patients, leaving two patients with permanent paraplegia. After we instituted the insulin infusion protocol, no patients developed lower extremity weakness

within the first 48 hours of repair. One patient did develop paraplegia on postoperative day four which was two days after the insulin had been stopped. This rate of early lower extremity weakness was significantly lower after initiation of the insulin infusion protocol.

And important to note that all patients in group B did require insulin at some point in the postoperative period. This table just describes the onset, laterality and nature of the deficit in the two groups of patients with lower extremity weakness.

Before initiation of the insulin infusion protocol, the blood and CSF glucose levels were significantly higher in the postoperative period in patients who develop lower extremity weakness compared to those who did not. After initiation of the insulin infusion protocol the glucose levels in the blood and CSF in this group

of patients was similar to those patients in the earlier group who did not have lower extremity weakness. So in conclusion, patients with elevated blood and CSF glucose levels are at higher risk for postoperative lower extremity weakness.

And strict control of their blood glucose levels in the first 48 hours appears to decrease this risk. And maybe that elevated glucose levels are directly toxic to neuronal tissue and what we're seeing are the protective effects of euglycemia. However, insulin receptors are abundant throughout the CNS,

so it's possible that we're also seeing one of the pleiotropic effects of insulin as it's known to have anti-inflammatory and vasodilatory effects throughout the CNS. So we're actually speculating that this postoperative hyperglycemia could be due to a state

of acute insulin resistance. And we're currently studying some changes in neuron-derived blood exosomes before and after MBEVAR to try to understand the processes at play. So stay tuned.

- I have nothing to disclose but what I will tell you is that the only way for me to learn the mechanics of treating low-flow malformations has been to learn from Wayne, follow what he's doing, and basically what I've done is I've filmed every single step he's taking,

dissect that, and then present you the way that he's doing it. The best way to do that is not listen to Wayne, but to film him, and just to check that afterwards. And he goes regularly to Cairo, this is the place of Dr. Rodovan sitting here

in front of us, and with Dr. Alaa Roshdy. I've learned a lot there from Wayne. This is Wayne's techniques, so normally if you look at puncture, the low flow malformations here then you get return or you aspirate so this is what happens, they inject contrast then they find volume

and inject whatever agent you prefer to inject. It happens to be alcohol but that is not essential. More often than not, there is no return. What to do then? There is a technique that Wayne has developed. Stab-Inject-Withdraw, just under high modification inject,

identify that you're not outside the vessel, get the vessel, start to fill slowly, and identify that and inject the alcohol. Of course you can do that under exposure just to see the effect of the alcohol thrombosing, et cetera.

Another example of no return is to subcutaneously certainly show that there is a low pressure system, and again, Stab-Inject-Withdrawal, and there is a cyst. Is it extravasation or is the malformation aspirate? And if it collapses, that's the malformation.

And then continue to fill in with contrast, define how big the malformation is, and then accordingly inject the amount of abrasive agent that you're using. Lymphatic malformation is very difficult to treat because the vessel's so small, would say microscopic,

and again, Stab-Inject-Withdraw, identify that it's not extravasating but it is the vessel, and start slowly, slowly to fill and any time in doubt that should there, just do a run, identify, and that is the vessel, or the network of the vessels and

start to fill that with the agent you're using. But there are certain zones that just don't inject anything, and these are the arteries. How often do arteries occur? When you puncture them. I just directly looked at all these 155 patients I've seen Wayne treat there a matter of,

I would say, 100 patients in three days. 30 patients per day, that's about six percent. And you see the artery by pulsating flow depending on the pressure that you apply. And we see again the artery pulsating and we have no doubt about that.

However, it could be difficult to see. Depending on how much you push in the contrast and you see these being ornery so there's a No-Go-Zone, no injection of any agent and again, a tiny bit of lottery there in the foot could be disastrous.

You inject any agent, any, you will have ended up with necrosis of course if you don't inject inhibitors, but not yet. The humorous may not end up with necrosis when all the mysticism with puncture will be gone. So we have extravasation, when you say extravasation

like starting injecting, still good, looking good, but you see how the extravasation even blows up and at the end it bursts, again under pressure they should apply, so pressure is really important to control and then you stop and don't inject any more.

Extravasation, you see how its' leaking in the back there, but you correct the position of the needle, identify all the vessels, the tiny little vessels, just have to be used to identify the pattern and then you start to inject the agent again.

Control is very essential. Here is the emphatic malformation labia and though there is this tiny little bity extravasation you continue because there is you know, run-off, it is filling the system and you can safely inject the alcohol.

Intraarticular could be malformation there and this is definitely safe pla however, if it is in the free space in the the joint, that's again, it's No-Go-Zone. How you see that is just be used to

the pattern recognition and you find that this is free. It's around the condyle there so there is no injection. Compression is again good to note to control by compression where the agents go. This is a normal vein, certainly at risk of getting with alcohol, whatever agent

you're using deep in the system, avoid that by compression. Compression can be applied manually and then that gives you a chance to fill the malformation itself and not strike connection too deep in the system. Intraosseous venous malformation,

low-flow malformations can occur anywhere, here in the spine and the axis is transpedicular patient prone because it's soft. The malformation has softened up the bone. You can just use a 21-gauge needle and identify the malformation and follow

by the agent you're using. Peculiar type of venous malformation called capillary venous malformation. Basically it's a low-flow malformation without any shunt here in the sciatic notch of the patient and geography shows that there is no shunt

there is just big veins and intense pacification. And identify the veins by indirect puncture again, see the pattern of that and inject alcohol and following geography we can see that there has decreased the density but it is a lot more left to be done.

In conclusion, direct puncture is the technique in this low-flow malformation but Stab-Inject-Withdraw is the really helpful technique for successful treatment of microvascular, microcystic lesion. No-Go-Zones for certain when you see arteries

and anytime in doubt you just have to do a run to identify if they're arteries or not. Intraarticular free space and extravasation and normal veins, similarly, No-Go-Zone. Capillary venous, intraosseous malformations can be treated successfully. Thank you.

(audience applause) - [Facilitator] Thank you, Crossey. Excellent talk, very practical and pragmatic. Any comments or questions? Dr. Yakes. - [Dr. Yakes] We have been to many meetings and people have talked about doing

other ultrasound guides, accessing the malformations. You'll never see those arteries by ultrasound. - [Facilitator] That's absolutely correct. I concur. I concur and I think some of the disasters we've seen where suddenly something falls off

have been in these situations because they don't understand or in expansile foam-based therapies, I've seen that. I've seen plenty of these, so it's always present, potentially.

- Thank you very much, chairman and ladies and gentlemen. The funding of this trial was from The Academy of Medical Sciences and The Royal College of Surgeons of England. AKI due to the influence EVAR is actually more common than we all think. This is being shown by prospective studies and registries.

Why is it important? Well, it's associated with a higher intra or inter hospital mortality, cardiovascular events and also long term cardiovascular events and longterm mortality. As even more common and complex, EVAR, and this can range from 22% up to 32%.

These are some of our cases, some of our first, including FEN astrate EVAR in 2010 Thoraco-Abdominal Branch repair 2016 and Fen astrated TEVAR 2018. These are longer procedures, usually with more contrast and direct ventilation after removing arteries.

What are the mechanisms for acute kidney injuries due to infer-renal EVAR? While this involves use of contrast, systemic inflammatory response syndrome, due to ischemic re-perfusion injury, manipulation of the thrombus, aorta and catheterizations which will ------ alpha

and also from high prophalinemia. There is no high-quality evidence for AKI prevention in EVAR. What about Sodium Bicarbonate? Well it's been well know to reduce what been used commonly to reduce CIN in high risk patients in perrifical and

corona graphy. There are two main mechanisms as to how this works. Firstly, from reducing renal tubular ischemia. Secondly, by reducing oxygen deprived free radical formation in the tubules. What is the evidence?

Well this is a met analysis, comparing Sodium Bicarbonate directly with hydration with normal saline, as shown in the orange box. There is no difference. We can look at the population ll

mostly CKD patients or diabetic patients, certainly Hartmann's patients but they are not EVAR patients. They are coronary patients or peripheral an-graphy patients. In addition, serum bicarbonate and the urine pH was not reported so we do not know how effective the Bicarbonate was in these RCT's.

The authors went on to look other outcomes including needful hemo dialysis, cardiac events, the mortality and they found no difference but they concluded the strength of this evidence was low and insufficient. A further Meta-analysis this time published in BMJ this time comes in favor of bicarbonate

but again this is comparing bicarbonate with saline no use of combination therapy. There are again no use of EVAR patients and these patients all have a low eGFR. The preserved trial, a large trial published earlier this year in the New England Journal again using various

treatments again comparing sodium bicarbonates and saline again no difference. But again this compares bicarbonate direct with saline with no combination therapies. In addition, there were no EVAR patients, and these are low eGFR patients.

The met-analysis also showed that by using bicarbonates as a bolus dose rather than a continuous infusion, which was actually the way they used bicarbonates in most of these patients might be better. And using a higher dose of bicarbonate may also be better as shown in this Japanese paper.

So we come to HYDRA trial. They're using a high dose bicarbonate in combination with hydration to protect renal function. We did a UK wide survey of anesthetists of day to day and they felt the best volume expander they would like to use was Hartmann's solution.

So we randomized patients between standard hydration with Hartmann's solution verses standard hydration Hartmann's plus high dose bicarbonate per operatively and low slow intravenous infusion bicarbonate during the surgery. Importantly, with these patients,

we kept the map within 80% of baseline, 90% of the time in contrary to all the RCT's coronary and angeo-porphyry. We're going to skip that slide. This is the inclusion criteria, any patient undergoing infra EVAR, with any renal disfunction,

the primary area you must look at is recruitment and the second area you must look at is AKI. We screened 109 patients of which, 58% were randomized and there were only 2 crossovers. There was a willingness for patients to participate and there was also a willingness for PET 4 Clinitions to

recruit as well. This is the demographics, which is typical of aortic patients they are all on by a few MRSA patients, have normal renal function. Most of the patients wear statins and anti pace agent, only 13% were diabetic.

The patients were matched in terms of hypertension and also fluid hydration pre-operatively measures of via impedance. Here are the results of the trial. The AKI instance in the standard hydration group was like 3% and 7.1% with standard hydration plus bicarbonate. And it was similar in terms of organotrophic support into

and postop and also contrast volume used. It's a safe regime with none of the patients suffering as a result of using bicarbonate. So to conclude, to answer professor Veith's question, about how was this trial different to all the other trials? Well, certainly the previous trials have compared

bicarbonate with saline, there's lack of combination studies that involve mostly coronary an peripheral procedures, not EVAR. And the the most only included patient with low eGFR. HYDRA is different, this is not a regime using high dose bolus of sodium bicarb combined with standard hydration.

It shows promise of reducing AKO. This is an EVAR specific pilot RCT. Again, Unlike previous trials using bicarbonate, 90% of the patients had normal or mild impaired renal function. And unlike previous trials, there's more aggressive management of hypertension intra and postoperatively.

Thank you for listening.

- Thank you very much and thank you Frank for giving me the opportunity to speak. And I will adapt my talk because I saw some of the slides, I will have to comment of course. So I have no financial disclosures. In many, many papers we know that Endovascular Treatment needs a word

of caution for long-term follow-up and we can see many, many pictures with very good results of viaven or other devices but when you look at the long-term follow-up for this patient, it's quite awful.

So we have late thrombosis just like this, we have curves that goes down and down after 40 or 60 months and much of the patients are very young and so I think it's not a good option. On the contrary, the durability

of open popliteal aneurysm repair has been showed and it's been showed by another of the panelist there and of course I think it's the good way to do and there are several options. The first one, this one, is quite rare

just to make resection with direct anastomosis like this, but it could happen and in this kind of patient, mostly when they are young patients, you don't have to make interposition of any graft.

I mean no vein, no SFA, and no prosthetic grafts. When you have to make some of the conventional open repair just like this, you have to choose between an exclusion graft like this,

I don't like it really much because it can leave a very important aneurysm and it takes a lot of place and it is prone to growing after due to the collaterals

going to the aneurysm sac. Most of the times I like to do something which is a combination of both these two pictures. I mean I like to open the sac to make the aneurysm or if you have the collaterals and then to make a end-to-end

anastomosis at both sides. Of course, when you go to the segment in the gonoral approach you have to make a venous bypass and venous bypass is probably

better when the run-off is awful just like this, but for this patient this was something needing a venous graft and this for me can be treated by synthetic graft because it ends at this level

that mean retroarticular level. So, for the venous graft, I go to venous graft only when I have to make the anastomosis directly on lower-leg vessel just like this and then you mention this

specific paper and if you could read this paper, I'm not one of the first author of this paper because I don't follow this thing because as you say, I think it's not good at all

to section all the muscles and this patient, I know this patient, they can't walk anymore for probably two months, it's not a good option but I'm part of that team and I don't want to defend it for now. Prosthetic bypass is I prefer

because this is very ancient, I agree with you, it's not modern situation, it is very ancient situation but the main thing is that you don't have to cut all the muscles, you have to select patients

with distal neck or retroarticular popliteal artery with good arterial runoff, aminolytic vessels and you have to select the patient and the Angio-CT rather than the angiogram except for

selecting the quality of the run-off. So who should be selected, this kind of patient can be selected because the prosthetic graft will end only here.

And this one could be also, but you can s there is origin of the arteritica artery.

And you have to think at the level of cutting the lower knee popliteal artery. And most of the time you can just externalize the lower knee popliteal artery to make

anastomosis. And then when you make the distal anastomosis, first you can reintegrate after there is the graft. And then the graft in the anastomotic sides goes just below

the level of the endoarticular line just like this. So for me, this is a go even if

you see that it goes just right to the condyles like this. And if you make some pictures with the reflection of the knees, there is no problem for the space. And even when there is a large

length beneath the artery like this. So when (unidentifiable phrase) where there's no vein and no below knee extension. So these are the technique that I expect I already talk about.

This is a small surveys we did I did finally. 20 popliteal arteries, this is the mean diameters. All the patients had good run-off as you can see. And there were only five long bypasses from the common femoral artery.

The other one from the popliteal or distal SFA. This is the mean Length of Stay 4 days only. The limb salvage rate is 100%. Primary patency rates were at one, two and three as 10

and secondary rates were 100% with mean follow-up 2 30 months. So prosthetic bypass is our simple, safe durable options.

I don't cut any muscles for this kind of option. Results compare favorably with our other open and endovascular techniques. And the French survey is going on for now. Thank you very much. (Audience applauds)

- Thank you. I have two talks because Dr. Gaverde, I understand, is not well, so we- - [Man] Thank you very much. - We just merged the two talks. All right, it's a little joke. For today's talk we used fusion technology

to merge two talks on fusion technology. Hopefully the rest of the talk will be a little better than that. (laughs) I think we all know from doing endovascular aortic interventions

that you can be fooled by the 2D image and here's a real life view of how that can be an issue. I don't think I need to convince anyone in this room that 3D fusion imaging is essential for complex aortic work. Studies have clearly shown it decreases radiation,

it decreases fluoro time, and decreases contrast use, and I'll just point out that these data are derived from the standard mechanical based systems. And I'll be talking about a cloud-based system that's an alternative that has some advantages. So these traditional mechanical based 3D fusion images,

as I mentioned, do have some limitations. First of all, most of them require manual registration which can be cumbersome and time consuming. Think one big issue is the hardware based tracking system that they use. So they track the table rather than the patient

and certainly, as the table moves, and you move against the table, the patient is going to move relative to the table, and those images become unreliable. And then finally, the holy grail of all 3D fusion imaging is the distortion of pre-operative anatomy

by the wires and hardware that are introduced during the course of your procedure. And one thing I'd like to discuss is the possibility that deep machine learning might lead to a solution to these issues. How does 3D fusion, image-based 3D fusion work?

Well, you start, of course with your pre-operative CT dataset and then you create digitally reconstructed radiographs, which are derived from the pre-op CTA and these are images that resemble the fluoro image. And then tracking is done based on the identification

of two or more vertebral bodies and an automated algorithm matches the most appropriate DRR to the live fluoro image. Sounds like a lot of gobbledygook but let me explain how that works. So here is the AI machine learning,

matching what it recognizes as the vertebral bodies from the pre-operative CT scan to the fluoro image. And again, you get the CT plus the fluoro and then you can see the overlay with the green. And here's another version of that or view of that.

You can see the AI machine learning, identifying the vertebral bodies and then on your right you can see the fusion image. So just, once again, the AI recognizes the bony anatomy and it's going to register the CT with the fluoro image. It tracks the patient, not the table.

And the other thing that's really important is that it recognizes the postural change that the patient undergoes between the posture during the CT scan, versus the posture on the OR table usually, or often, under general anesthesia. And here is an image of the final overlay.

And you can see the visceral and renal arteries with orange circles to identify them. You can remove those, you can remove any of those if you like. This is the workflow. First thing you do is to upload the CT scan to the cloud.

Then, when you're ready to perform the procedure, that is downloaded onto the medical grade PC that's in your OR next to your fluoro screen, and as soon as you just step on the fluoro pedal, the CYDAR overlay appears next to your, or on top of your fluoro image,

next to your regular live fluoro image. And every time you move the table, the computer learning recognizes that the images change, and in a couple of seconds, it replaces with a new overlay based on the obliquity or table position that you have. There are some additional advantages

to cloud-based technology over mechanical technology. First of all, of course, or hardware type technology. Excuse me. You can upgrade it in real time as opposed to needing intermittent hardware upgrades. Works with any fluoro equipment, including a C-arm,

so you don't have to match your 3D imaging to the brand of your fluoro imaging. And there's enhanced accuracy compared to mechanical registration systems as imaging. So what are the clinical applications that this can be utilized for?

Fluoroscopy guided endovascular procedures in the lower thorax, abdomen, and pelvis, so that includes EVAR and FEVAR, mid distal TEVAR. At present, we do need two vertebral bodies and that does limit the use in TEVAR. And then angioplasty stenting and embolization

of common iliac, proximal external and proximal internal iliac artery. Anything where you can acquire a vertebral body image. So here, just a couple of examples of some additional non EVAR/FEVAR/TEVAR applications. This is, these are some cases

of internal iliac embolization, aortoiliac occlusion crossing, standard EVAR, complex EVAR. And I think then, that the final thing that I'd like to talk about is the use with C-arm, which is think is really, extremely important.

Has the potential to make a very big difference. All of us in our larger OR suites, know that we are short on hybrid availability, and yet it's difficult to get our institutions to build us another hybrid room. But if you could use a high quality 3D fusion imaging

with a high quality C-arm, you really expand your endovascular capability within the operating room in a much less expensive way. And then if you look at another set of circumstances where people don't have a hybrid room at all, but do want to be able to offer standard EVAR

to their patients, and perhaps maybe even basic FEVAR, if there is such a thing, and we could use good quality imaging to do that in the absence of an actual hybrid room. That would be extremely valuable to be able to extend good quality care

to patients in under-served areas. So I just was mentioning that we can use this and Tara Mastracci was talking yesterday about how happy she is with her new room where she has the use of CYDAR and an excellent C-arm and she feels that she is able to essentially run two rooms,

two hybrid rooms at once, using the full hybrid room and the C-arm hybrid room. Here's just one case of Dr. Goverde's. A vascular case that he did on a mobile C-arm with aortoiliac occlusive disease and he places kissing stents

using a CYDAR EV and a C-arm. And he used five mils of iodinated contrast. So let's talk about a little bit of data. This is out of Blain Demorell and Tara Mastrachi's group. And this is use of fusion technology in EVAR. And what they found was that the use of fusion imaging

reduced air kerma and DSA runs in standard EVAR. We also looked at our experience recently in EVAR and FEVAR and we compared our results. Pre-availability of image based fusion CT and post image based fusion CT. And just to clarify,

we did have the mechanical product that Phillip's offers, but we abandoned it after using it a half dozen times. So it's really no image fusion versus image fusion to be completely fair. We excluded patients that were urgent/emergent, parallel endographs, and IBEs.

And we looked at radiation exposure, contrast use, fluoro time, and procedure time. The demographics in the two groups were identical. We saw a statistically significant decrease in radiation dose using image based fusion CT. Statistically a significant reduction in fluoro time.

A reduction in contrast volume that looks significant, but was not. I'm guessing because of numbers. And a significantly different reduction in procedure time. So, in conclusion, image based 3D fusion CT decreases radiation exposure, fluoro time,

and procedure time. It does enable 3D overlays in all X-Ray sets, including mobile C-arm, expanding our capabilities for endovascular work. And image based 3D fusion CT has the potential to reduce costs

and improve clinical outcomes. Thank you.

- Lymphatic, so it's fun, actually, not to talk on venous interventions for once. And, naturally, the two systems are very different. But, on the other hand, they're also related in several ways and I will come back to that later. I have no disclosures, maybe only my gratitude to this man, Dr. Maxim Itkin,

who actually got me started in the field, and was gracious enough to supply me some of his material. And who is also responsible for making our lives way easier over the last years. Because in former times, we needed to do, to visualize the lymphatic system,

we needed to do pedal lymphangiography and that was very, very cumbersome. It took a long time and was very painful for the patient. And he introduced the ultrasound guided intranodal lymphangiography,

and that's fairly easy for most of us. With ultrasound you find a lymph node in the groin, you puncture that and you can control the needle position with contrast enhanced ultrasound and once you establish that position, you might do a MR lymphangiography.

Thereby showing, in this case, a beautiful, normal anatomy of the thoracic duct. I need to say, the variations in lymphatics are extreme. So, you can also visualize, naturally, the pathology, like for example, pulmonary lymphatic perfusion syndrome.

What's going on there. Normally, lymph courses up through thoracic duct, but in this case, you kind of have a reflux in the bronchial tree and lymph leakage. And you can image that again, beautifully with MR, which you can show extensive leakage

of lymph in the lung parenchyma. So you can treat that. How can you treat that? By embolization of the thoracic duct. But first we need to get into there, and that's not a very easy thing to do.

But now, again, with access to a lymph node in the groin, you can push lipiodol, and then visualize the cisterna chyli and access that transcutaneously with a 21/22 gauge needle and then push up a O-18 wire high up in the thoracic duct.

First you deploy some coils to prevent any leakage of glue inside the venous system, and then by microcatheter, you infuse glue all the way down, embolizing the thoracic duct. So, complete different group of lymphatic disorders is oriented in the liver and hepatic lymphatic disorders.

And maybe not everybody knows that, but 80% of the flow in the thoracic duct is caused by the liver and by the intestine. And many times in lymphatic disorders, there needs to be a combination of two factors. One factor is a venous variation of a,

sorry, an anatomical variation in lymph vessels and the other one is that we have an increase in lymph flow. And in the liver, that can be caused by a congestion of the liver, for example, cirrhosis, or a right side, that's congested heart failure.

What happens then is you increase the flow, the lymph flow, tremendously and if you also have a variation like in this case, when the vessels do not directly course towards the cisterna chyli, but in very close contact to the abdomen,

then you can have leakage of the lymph and leakage of proteins, which is a serious problem. So, what is then, to do next? You can access the lymph vessels in the liver by percutaneous access in the periportal space,

and induce some contrast and then later, visualize that one back, visualize that with dye that you can see with an endoscopy, thereby proving your diagnosis, and then, in a similar way,

you can induce lipiodol again with glue, embolizing the lymph vessels in the liver, treating the problem. In summary, popularity of lymphatic interventions really increased over the last years mainly because novel imaging,

novel interventional techniques, new approaches, and we all gained more experience. If you would like, I would guess that, we are at a phase where we were at venous, like 10, 15 years ago. If we are a little bit positive,

then the future is very bright. And within 10, 15 years, we find new indications and probably have much more to tell you. Thank you for your attention.

- Thank you for the opportunity to present this arch device. This is a two module arch device. The main model comes from the innominated to the descending thoracic aorta and has a large fenestration for the ascending model that is fixed with hooks and three centimeters overlapping with the main one.

The beginning fenestration for the left carotid artery was projected but was abandoned for technical issue. The delivery system is precurved, preshaped and this allows an easy positioning of the graft that runs on a through-and-through wire from the

brachial to the femoral axis and you see here how the graft, the main model is deployed with the blood that supported the supraortic vessels. The ascending model is deployed after under rapid pacing.

And this is the compilation angiogram. This is a case from our experience is 6.6 centimeters arch and descending aneurysm. This is the planning we had with the Gore Tag. at the bottom of the implantation and these are the measures.

The plan was a two-stage procedure. First the hemiarch the branching, and then the endovascular procedure. Here the main measure for the graph, the BCT origin, 21 millimeters, the BCT bifurcation, 20 millimeters,

length, 30 millimeters, and the distal landing zone was 35 millimeters. And these are the measures that we choose, because this is supposed to be an off-the-shelf device. Then the measure for the ascending, distal ascending, 35 millimeters,

proximal ascending, 36, length of the outer curve of 9 centimeters, on the inner curve of 5 centimeters, and the ascending model is precurved and we choose a length between the two I cited before. This is the implantation of the graft you see,

the graft in the BCT. Here, the angiography to visualize the bifurcation of the BCT, and the release of the first part of the graft in the BCT. Then the angiography to check the position. And the release of the graft by pushing the graft

to well open the fenestration for the ascending and the ascending model that is released under cardiac pacing. After the orientation of the beat marker. And finally, a kissing angioplasty and this is the completion and geography.

Generally we perform a percutaneous access at auxiliary level and we close it with a progolide checking the closure with sheet that comes from the groin to verify the good occlusion of the auxiliary artery. And this is the completion, the CT post-operative.

Okay. Seven arch aneurysm patients. These are the co-morbidities. We had only one minor stroke in the only patient we treated with the fenestration for the left carotid and symptomology regressed completely.

In the global study, we had 46 implantations, 37 single branch device in the BCT, 18 in the first in men, 19 compassionate. These are the co-morbidities and indications for treatment. All the procedures were successful.

All the patients survived the procedure. 10 patients had a periscope performed to perfuse the left auxiliary artery after a carotid to subclavian bypass instead of a hemiarch, the branching. The mean follow up for 25 patients is now 12 months.

Good technical success and patency. We had two cases of aneurysmal growth and nine re-interventions, mainly for type II and the leak for the LSA and from gutters. The capilomiar shows a survival of 88% at three years.

There were three non-disabling stroke and one major stroke during follow up, and three patients died for unrelated reasons. The re-intervention were mainly due to endo leak, so the first experience was quite good in our experience and thanks a lot.

- So I'm just going to talk a little bit about what's new in our practice with regard to first rib resection. In particular, we've instituted the use of a 30 degree laparoscopic camera at times to better visualize the structures. I will give you a little bit of a update

about our results and then I'll address very briefly some controversies. Dr. Gelbart and Chan from Hong Kong and UCLA have proposed and popularized the use of a 30 degree laparoscopic camera for a better visualization of the structures

and I'll show you some of those pictures. From 2007 on, we've done 125 of these procedures. We always do venography first including intervascular intervention to open up the vein, and then a transaxillary first rib resection, and only do post-operative venography if the vein reclots.

So this is a 19 year old woman who's case I'm going to use to illustrate our approach. She developed acute onset left arm swelling, duplex and venogram demonstrated a collusion of the subclavian axillary veins. Percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy

and then balloon angioplasty were performed with persistent narrowing at the thoracic outlet. So a day later, she was taken to the operating room, a small incision made in the axilla, we air interiorly to avoid injury to the long thoracic nerve.

As soon as you dissect down to the chest wall, you can identify and protect the vein very easily. I start with electrocautery on the peripheral margin of the rib, and use that to start both digital and Matson elevator dissection of the periosteum pleura

off the first rib, and then get around the anterior scalene muscle under direct visualization with a right angle and you can see that the vein and the artery are identified and easily protected. Here's the 30 degree laparoscopic image

of getting around the anterior scalene muscle and performing the electrocautery and you can see the pulsatile vein up here anterior and superficial to the anterior scalene muscle. Here is a right angle around the first rib to make sure there are no structures

including the pleura still attached to it. I always divide, or try to divide, the posterior aspect of the rib first because I feel like then I can manipulate the ribs superiorly and inferiorly, and get the rib shears more anterior for the anterior cut

because that's most important for decompressing the vein. Again, here's the 30 degree laparoscopic view of the rib shears performing first the posterior cut, there and then the anterior cut here. The portion of rib is removed, and you can see both the artery and the vein

are identified and you can confirm that their decompressed. We insufflate with water or saline, and then perform valsalva to make sure that they're hasn't been any pneumothorax, and then after putting a drain in,

I actually also turn the patient supine before extirpating them to make sure that there isn't a pneumothorax on chest x-ray. You can see the Jackson-Pratt drain in the left axilla. One month later, duplex shows a patent vein. So we've had pretty good success with this approach.

23 patients have requires post operative reintervention, but no operative venous reconstruction or bypass has been performed, and 123 out of 125 axillosubclavian veins have been patent by duplex at last follow-up. A brief comment on controversies,

first of all, the surgical approach we continue to believe that a transaxillary approach is cosmetically preferable and just as effective as a paraclavicular or anterior approach, and we have started being more cautious

about postoperative anticoagulation. So we've had three patients in that series that had to go back to the operating room for washout of hematoma, one patient who actually needed a VATS to treat a hemathorax,

and so in recent times we've been more cautious. In fact 39 patients have been discharged only with oral antiplatelet therapy without any plan for definitive therapeutic anticoagulation and those patients have all done very well. Obviously that's contraindicated in some cases

of a preoperative PE, or hematology insistence, or documented hypercoagulability and we've also kind of included that, the incidence of postop thrombosis of the vein requiring reintervention, but a lot of patients we think can be discharged

on just antiplatelets. So again, our approach to this is a transaxillary first rib resection after a venogram and a vascular intervention. We think this cosmetically advantageous. Surgical venous reconstruction has not been required

in any case, and we've incorporated the use of a 30 degree laparoscopic camera for better intraoperative visualization, thanks.

- I'm going to take it slightly beyond the standard role for the VBX and use it as we use it now for our fenestrated and branch and chimney grafts. These are my disclosures. You've seen these slides already, but the flexibility of VBX really does give us a significant ability to conform it

to the anatomies that we're dealing with. It's a very trackable stent. It doesn't, you don't have to worry about it coming off the balloon. Flexible as individual stents and in case in a PTFE so you can see it really articulates

between each of these rings of PTFE, or rings of stent and not connected together. I found I can use the smaller grafts, the six millimeter, for parallel grafts then flare them distally into my landing zone to customize it but keep the gutter relatively small

and decrease the instance of gutter leaks. So let's start with a presentation. I know we just had lunch so try and shake it up a little bit here. 72-year-old male that came in, history of a previous end-to-side aortobifemoral bypass graft

and then came in, had bilateral occluded external iliac arteries. I assume that's for the end-to-side anastomosis. I had a history of COPD, coronary artery disease, and peripheral arterial disease, and presented with a pseudoaneurysm

in the proximal juxtarenal graft anastomosis. Here you can see coming down the thing of most concern is both iliacs are occluded, slight kink in the aortofemoral bypass graft, but you see a common iliac coming down to the hypogastric, and that's really the only blood flow to the pelvis.

The aneurysm itself actually extended close to the renal, so we felt we needed to do a fenestrated graft. We came in with a fenestrated graft. Here's the renal vessels here, SMA. And then we actually came in from above in the brachial access and catheterized

the common iliac artery going down through the stenosis into the hypogastric artery. With that we then put a VBX stent graft in there which nicely deployed that, and you can see how we can customize the stent starting with a smaller stent here

and then flaring it more proximal as we move up through the vessel. With that we then came in and did our fenestrated graft. You can see fenestrations. We do use VBX for a good number of our fenestrated grafts and here you can see the tailoring.

You can see where a smaller artery, able to flare it at the level of the fenestration flare more for a good seal. Within the fenestration itself excellent flow to the left. We repeated the procedure on the right. Again, more customizable at the fenestration and going out to the smaller vessel.

And then we came down and actually extended down in a parallel graft down into that VBX to give us that parallel graft perfusion of the pelvis, and thereby we sealed the pseudoaneurysm and maintain tail perfusion of the pelvis and then through the aortofemoral limbs

to both of the common femoral arteries, and that resolved the pseudoaneurysm and maintained perfusion for us. We did a retrospective review of our data from August of 2014 through March of 2018. We had 183 patients who underwent endovascular repair

for a complex aneurysm, 106 which had branch grafts to the renals and the visceral vessels for 238 grafts. When we look at the breakdown here, of those 106, 38 patients' stents involved the use of VBX. This was only limited by the late release of the VBX graft.

And so we had 68 patients who were treated with non-VBX grafts. Their other demographics were very similar. We then look at the use, we were able to use some of the smaller VBXs, as I mentioned, because we can tailor it more distally

so you don't have to put a seven or eight millimeter parallel graft in, and with that we found that we had excellent results with that. Lower use of actual number of grafts, so we had, for VBX side we only had one graft

per vessel treated. If you look at the other grafts, they're anywhere between 1.2 and two grafts per vessel treated. We had similar mortality and followup was good with excellent graft patency for the VBX grafts.

As mentioned, technical success of 99%, mimicking the data that Dr. Metzger put forward to us. So in conclusion, I think VBX is a safe and a very versatile graft we can use for treating these complex aneurysms for perfusion of iliac vessels as well as visceral vessels

as we illustrated. And we use it for aortoiliac occlusive disease, branch and fenestrated grafts and parallel grafts. It's patency is equal to if not better than the similar grafts and has a greater flexibility for modeling and conforming to the existing anatomy.

Thank you very much for your attention.

- Thank you Mr. Chairman. Ladies and gentleman, first of all, I would like to thank Dr. Veith for the honor of the podium. Fenestrated and branched stent graft are becoming a widespread use in the treatment of thoracoabdominal

and pararenal aortic aneurysms. Nevertheless, the risk of reinterventions during the follow-up of these procedures is not negligible. The Mayo Clinic group has recently proposed this classification for endoleaks

after FEVAR and BEVAR, that takes into account all the potential sources of aneurysm sac reperfusion after stent graft implant. If we look at the published data, the reported reintervention rate ranges between three and 25% of cases.

So this is still an open issue. We started our experience with fenestrated and branched stent grafts in January 2016, with 29 patients treated so far, for thoracoabdominal and pararenal/juxtarenal aortic aneurysms. We report an elective mortality rate of 7.7%.

That is significantly higher in urgent settings. We had two cases of transient paraparesis and both of them recovered, and two cases of complete paraplegia after urgent procedures, and both of them died. This is the surveillance protocol we applied

to the 25 patients that survived the first operation. As you can see here, we used to do a CT scan prior to discharge, and then again at three and 12 months after the intervention, and yearly thereafter, and according to our experience

there is no room for ultrasound examination in the follow-up of these procedures. We report five reinterventions according for 20% of cases. All of them were due to endoleaks and were fixed with bridging stent relining,

or embolization in case of type II, with no complications, no mortality. I'm going to show you a couple of cases from our series. A 66 years old man, a very complex surgical history. In 2005 he underwent open repair of descending thoracic aneurysm.

In 2009, a surgical debranching of visceral vessels followed by TEVAR for a type III thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms. In 2016, the implant of a tube fenestrated stent-graft to fix a distal type I endoleak. And two years later the patient was readmitted

for a type II endoleak with aneurysm growth of more than one centimeter. This is the preoperative CT scan, and you see now the type II endoleak that comes from a left gastric artery that independently arises from the aneurysm sac.

This is the endoleak route that starts from a branch of the hepatic artery with retrograde flow into the left gastric artery, and then into the aneurysm sac. We approached this case from below through the fenestration for the SMA and the celiac trunk,

and here on the left side you see the superselective catheterization of the branch of the hepatic artery, and on the right side the microcatheter that has reached the nidus of the endoleak. We then embolized with onyx the endoleak

and the feeding vessel, and this is the nice final result in two different angiographic projections. Another case, a 76 years old man. In 2008, open repair for a AAA and right common iliac aneurysm.

Eight years later, the implant of a T-branch stent graft for a recurrent type IV thoracoabdominal aneurysm. And one year later, the patient was admitted again for a type IIIc endoleak, plus aneurysm of the left common iliac artery. This is the CT scan of this patient.

You will see here the endoleak at the level of the left renal branch here, and the aneurysm of the left common iliac just below the stent graft. We first treated the iliac aneurysm implanting an iliac branched device on the left side,

so preserving the left hypogastric artery. And in the same operation, from a bowl, we catheterized the left renal branch and fixed the endoleak that you see on the left side, with a total stent relining, with a nice final result on the right side.

And this is the CT scan follow-up one year after the reintervention. No endoleak at the level of the left renal branch, and nice exclusion of the left common iliac aneurysm. In conclusion, ladies and gentlemen, the risk of type I endoleak after FEVAR and BEVAR

is very low when the repair is planning with an adequate proximal sealing zone as we heard before from Professor Verhoeven. Much of reinterventions are due to type II and III endoleaks that can be treated by embolization or stent reinforcement. Last, but not least, the strict follow-up program

with CT scan is of paramount importance after these procedures. I thank you very much for your attention.

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