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Common Iliac AAA | rEVAR (Aorto-Uni-Iliac), Fem-Fem Bypass, Balloon Angioplasty | 78 | Female
Common Iliac AAA | rEVAR (Aorto-Uni-Iliac), Fem-Fem Bypass, Balloon Angioplasty | 78 | Female
2016AtriumballoonbloodbraidedendovascularfrenchgraftgroinicastiliacladyMedtronicnitinolsheathSIRstent
Elevation Or Retunneling For Second Stage Basilic Vein Transposition
Elevation Or Retunneling For Second Stage Basilic Vein Transposition
anastomosisarterialbasiliccomparablecomparedcumulativedatafavoredFistulafistulasgraftsjournalmaturationOne & Two Stage procedurespatenciespatencyprimaryrangeratesstagestagedstratifiedSuperficializationsuperiorTrans-positiontransectiontransposedtranspositiontunnelingvascularveinveinsversus
Percutaneous Pharmaco-Mechanical Intervention For PE: Is There A Rationale
Percutaneous Pharmaco-Mechanical Intervention For PE: Is There A Rationale
Angiodynamicsangiovaccannulacircuit for thrombiemboli removalFlowTriever (Infusion aspiration system - Inari) / Penumbra CAT8 (Thromboaspiration system - Penumbra) / AngioJet (Peripheral thrombectomy system - Boston Scientific)therapeutic
Advancing The Science In PE Treatment - What Do We Need To Know, And How Will We Learn
Advancing The Science In PE Treatment - What Do We Need To Know, And How Will We Learn
AngioVac (AngioDynamics) / FlowTriever (Inari) / Penumbra device (Penumbra Inc)Argon MedicalCDTCleaner devicePEpressorsRotational thrombectomy systemtherapeutic
Vacuum Assisted Thrombectomy With The Penumbra Indigo System For Visceral And Lower Limb Artery Occlusions
Vacuum Assisted Thrombectomy With The Penumbra Indigo System For Visceral And Lower Limb Artery Occlusions
Aorto-Renal BypassAspiration SystemGore Viabahn VBX (Gore Medical)PenumbraPenumbra’s Indigotherapeutic
Non-Invasive 24/7 Flow Augmentation In Deep Venous Pathology
Non-Invasive 24/7 Flow Augmentation In Deep Venous Pathology
analyzedbloodcalfcompressiondecreasedevicedevicesfemoralflowhealthyimprovesincreaseincreasedintermittentneurostimulationpatientspilotpneumaticstentstentingstimulatestimulationstudiesveinvelocityvenousvolume
Octopus Technique To Treat Urgent Or Ruptured TAAAs With OTS Components: What Is It, Technical Tips And Results
Octopus Technique To Treat Urgent Or Ruptured TAAAs With OTS Components: What Is It, Technical Tips And Results
6.8 cm TAAAGORE MedicalGore Viabahn VBXOctopus Endovascular Techniquestent graft systemtherapeuticviabahn
Update On The Advantages, Limitations And Midterm Results With The Terumo Aortic 3 Branch Arch Device: What Lesions Can It Treat
Update On The Advantages, Limitations And Midterm Results With The Terumo Aortic 3 Branch Arch Device: What Lesions Can It Treat
4 branch CMD TAAA deviceacuteAscending Graft Replacementcardiac arrestRelayBranchRepair segment with CMD Cuffruptured type A dissection w/ tamponadestent graft systemTerumo Aortictherapeutic
Terumo Aortic Relay Thoracic Endograft For TEVAR In Complex Aortic Pathology With Angles >90°: Advantages And Results
Terumo Aortic Relay Thoracic Endograft For TEVAR In Complex Aortic Pathology With Angles >90°: Advantages And Results
Gore Tag (Gore Medical) / Valiant (Medtronic) / Zenith Alpha (Cook Medical)RelayPlusstent graft systemTerumo Aortictherapeutic
Value Of Parallel Grafts To Treat Chronic TBADs With Extensive TAAAs: Technical Tips And Results
Value Of Parallel Grafts To Treat Chronic TBADs With Extensive TAAAs: Technical Tips And Results
GORE MedicalGORE VIABAHNL EIA-IIA bypassleft carotid subclavian bypassstent graft systemTBAD with TAAAtherapeutic
Rifampin Soaked Endografts For Treating Prosthetic Graft Infections: When Can They Work And What Associated Techniques Are Important
Rifampin Soaked Endografts For Treating Prosthetic Graft Infections: When Can They Work And What Associated Techniques Are Important
2 arch homograftsOpen Ilio-Celiac bypassSacular TAA ; Endograft AbscessTAAA repair with left heart bypassTEVARtherapeutic
Surgical Creation Of A Moncusp Valve
Surgical Creation Of A Moncusp Valve
applycompetingcontralateraldeependovascularfibroticflapflowhemodynamicmalfunctioningmobilemodelingMono-cuspid neovalveMono-cuspid Stent PrototypeparietalreconstructionrefluxstentthrombosisvalveValvuloplastyveinvenouswall
Which Stent Would I Use In: Malignancy, Across Inguinal Ligament, IVC, Into Profunda Femoris Vein
Which Stent Would I Use In: Malignancy, Across Inguinal Ligament, IVC, Into Profunda Femoris Vein
Bardo Venovo / Medtronic ABRE / Optimed SInus oblique / Veniti ViciCook Zilver VenaMedtronicstent
Challenges And Solutions In Complex Dialysis Access Cases
Challenges And Solutions In Complex Dialysis Access Cases
accessangiogramarteryaxillarybrachialcannulationcathetercentralchallengeschallengingconnecteddissectedextremityFistulaflowfunctioninggoregrafthybridischemiaMorbid Obese/Sub-optimal anatomy / need immediate accessoutflowpatientRt Upper Arm loop AVGsegmentstealStent graftsuboptimaltransplanttunneleduppervascularveinvenous
Transcript

This is a 78 year old lady with a known AAA now growing to about 6 cm diabetic,

hypertensive, and COPD. Again these guys with COPD have a higher rupture risk. Obviously we wanted to recommend repair. This is an older case but I think it shows some good points. Here's the inferior aortic aneurysm. This is a chrono mep/g showing basically ectatic or aneurysmal

common iliacs, and not probably projecting as well but she has very small calcified iliac arteries. Torturous as well. So this a lady where I think she had a reasonable neck but her access vessels were an issue. So we brought her to

angiography. This is back in the day when we did open growing exposures. You can see this huge large common iliacs. Her neck isn't horrible but it's not perfect certainly do able. I believe this is just a 8 French sheath that's inclusive. This is her externally iliac.

Very small iliacs. So our goal is to pass the main body from the right groin. This is our endo-conduit technique where we put roughly in an 8 French sheath and either 7 to 10 mm iCAST depending on what we think we need. Just a balloon expandable stent.

Inflation that's our post picture, I believe this is an 8 mm iCAST. We are able to preserve the internal here but our main body went to the past to the groin set, left to

plan B. So we turned our attention to the left groin which I felt was the worst groin, we went to the right thinking that it would work. And again this is an older case where we were using what we thought was the slickest endo-graph at the time it was a metronic that was probably one of the lower profile cases of that year.

So we attempt to do the same here. In this case we thought that the iCAST was actually interfering with passage of the stent so we angioplasted with the external iliac with the 8 mm balloon. A little big certainly for this lady but we needed at least something in this ball park of calibar to get our graft up,

and then we found this. I really wish I hadn't seen any of this but I was thinking other things when I din't save the run, but this is- >> So you tell me when you balloon a 4 mm vessel with a 8 mm

you think it would drop? >> Sometimes if they seem to rapture in the classified little old lady [LAUGH] yeah. >> [INAUDIBLE] from the endovascular it's like there's a 5 mm external that ballooned to 10 and then raptures, I was like >> Yeah I shouldn't be surprised. I will say that whenever we do these things you want to expect things like this, the iCASTer was already ready to go.

We partially expected this. This is the unsubtracted image. Amazing how quickly blood pressure can drop when you have an angio like this. >> Did you put a stent quickly? >> No no I just talked about it, we're just talking about it.

>> [CROSS-TALK] >> So next up, a couple of options for us generally is sslamming the balloon back up there and then making sure you have iCAST. This is iCAST stenting right across here and then we had control and the patient was responding very quickly to this.

She didn't really actually require too much pressure support though her blood pressure did change. So then we wanted obviously continue with our EVAR and this is a large graft this is 2008 probably but we thought it was the smallest graft at the time and then we completed our endovascular repair and we telescoped it basically into the iCAST that we delivered,

and this is how she looked when we were done. This a CT post EVAR. She dropped her crane/g obviously and this again it's how amazing how quick she bled but she was stable so she was watched in the ICU for a while, I do believe she received two units of blood post

procedure and what would I do differently, I think there's a lot of options now, this is eight years later and we've talked about the trivascular we talked about the even the enduring as much more low profile the GORD now goes through a 16 French sheath, but also a short

discussion about adjunct devices such as the SoloPath in addition to adjuncts procedure such as the endoconduit. The S Terumo SolaPath generally allows us, initially is for TAVI I think that's where it got more popularity and TEVAR but all that stuff has come down a profile,

it's a very interesting system. I used the first and second generations, the second generations are obviously a lot better. Basically it's a balloon dialator that allows you to expand a nitinol braided stent,

right now now a nitinol braided sheath and allows you to deliver larger systems, and they come in a variety of sizes. Actually not in every size you may want. I think the biggest is the 23 French or 24 French, but again it allows you to get some other difficult cases done.

- [Presenter] Thank you very much, Mr. Chairman, and ladies and gentlemen, and Frank Veith for this opportunity. Before I start my talk, actually, I can better sit down, because Hans and I worked together. We studied in the same city, we finished our medical study there, we also specialized in surgery

in the same city, we worked together at the same University Hospital, so what should I tell you? Anyway, the question is sac enlargement always benign has been answered. Can we always detect an endoleak, that is nice. No, because there are those hidden type II's,

but as Hans mentioned, there's also a I a and b, position dependent, possible. Hidden type III, fabric porosity, combination of the above. Detection, ladies and gentlemen, is limited by the tools we have, and CTA, even in the delayed phase

and Duplex-scan with contrast might not always be good enough to detect these lesions, these endoleaks. This looks like a nice paper, and what we tried to do is to use contrast-enhanced agents in combination with MRI. And here you see the pictures. And on the top you see the CTA, with contrast,

and also in the delayed phase. And below, you see this weak albumin contrast agent in an MRI and shows clearly where the leak is present. So without this tool, we were never able to detect an endoleak with the usual agents. So, at this moment, we don't know always whether contrast

in the Aneurysm Sac is only due to a type II. I think this is an important message that Hans pushed upon it. Detection is limited by the tools we have, but the choice and the success of the treatment is dependent on the kind of endoleak, let that be clear.

So this paper has been mentioned and is using not these advanced tools. It is only using very simple methods, so are they really detecting type II endoleaks, all of them. No, of course not, because it's not the golden standard. So, nevertheless, it has been published in the JVS,

it's totally worthless, from a scientific point of view. Skip it, don't read it. The clinical revelance of the type II endoleak. It's low pressure, Hans pointed it out. It works, also in ruptured aneurysms, but you have to be sure that the type II is the only cause

of Aneurysm Sac Expansion. So, is unlimited Sac Expansion harmless. I agree with Hans that it is not directly life threatening, but it ultimately can lead to dislodgement and widening of the neck and this will lead to an increasing risk for morbidity and even mortality.

So, the treatment of persistent type II in combination with Sac Expansion, and we will hear more about this during the rest of the session, is Selective Coil-Embolisation being preferred for a durable solution. I'm not so much a fan of filling the Sac, because as was shown by Stephan Haulan, we live below the dikes

and if we fill below the dikes behind the dikes, it's not the solution to prevent rupture, you have to put something in front of the dike, a Coil-Embolisation. So classic catheterisation of the SMA or Hypogastric, Trans Caval approach is now also popular,

and access from the distal stent-graft landing zone is our current favorite situation. Shows you quickly a movie where we go between the two stent-grafts in the iliacs, enter the Sac, and do the coiling. So, prevention of the type II during EVAR

might be a next step. Coil embolisation during EVAR has been shown, has been published. EVAS, is a lot of talks about this during this Veith meeting and the follow-up will tell us what is best. In conclusions, the approach to sac enlargement

without evident endoleak. I think unlimited Sac expansion is not harmless, even quality of life is involved. What should your patient do with an 11-centimeter bilp in his belly. Meticulous investigation of the cause of the Aneurysm Sac

Expansion is mandatory to achieve a, between quote, durable treatment, because follow-up is crucial to make that final conclusion. And unfortunately, after treatment, surveillance remains necessary in 2017, at least. And this is Hans Brinker, who put his finger in the dike,

to save our country from a type II endoleak, and I thank you for your attention.

- Thank you so much. We have no disclosures. So I think everybody would agree that the transposed basilic vein fistula is one of the most important fistulas that we currently operate with. There are many technical considerations

related to the fistula. One is whether to do one or two stage. Your local criteria may define how you do this, but, and some may do it arbitrarily. But some people would suggest that anything less than 4 mm would be a two stage,

and any one greater than 4 mm may be a one stage. The option of harvesting can be open or endovascular. The option of gaining a suitable access site can be transposition or superficialization. And the final arterial anastomosis, if you're not superficializing can either be

a new arterial anastomosis or a venovenous anastomosis. For the purposes of this talk, transposition is the dissection, transection and re tunneling of the basilic vein to the superior aspect of the arm, either as a primary or staged procedure. Superficialization is the dissection and elevation

of the basilic vein to the superior aspect of the upper arm, which may be done primarily, but most commonly is done as a staged procedure. The natural history of basilic veins with regard to nontransposed veins is very successful. And this more recent article would suggest

as you can see from the upper bands in both grafts that either transposed or non-transposed is superior to grafts in current environment. When one looks at two-stage basilic veins, they appear to be more durable and cost-effective than one-stage procedures with significantly higher

patency rates and lower rates of failure along comparable risk stratified groups from an article from the Journal of Vascular Surgery. Meta-ana, there are several meta-analysis and this one shows that between one and two stages there is really no difference in the failure and the patency rates.

The second one would suggest there is no overall difference in maturation rate, or in postoperative complication rates. With the patency rates primary assisted or secondary comparable in the majority of the papers published. And the very last one, again based on the data from the first two, also suggests there is evidence

that two stage basilic vein fistulas have higher maturation rates compared to the single stage. But I think that's probably true if one really realizes that the first stage may eliminate a lot of the poor biology that may have interfered with the one stage. But what we're really talking about is superficialization

versus transposition, which is the most favorite method. Or is there a favorite method? The early data has always suggested that transposition was superior, both in primary and in secondary patency, compared to superficialization. However, the data is contrary, as one can see,

in this paper, which showed the reverse, which is that superficialization is much superior to transposition, and in the primary patency range quite significantly. This paper reverses that theme again. So for each year that you go to the Journal of Vascular Surgery,

one gets a different data set that comes out. The final paper that was published recently at the Eastern Vascular suggested strongly that the second stage does consume more resources, when one does transposition versus superficialization. But more interestingly also found that these patients

who had the transposition had a greater high-grade re-stenosis problem at the venovenous or the veno-arterial anastomosis. Another point that they did make was that superficialization appeared to lead to faster maturation, compared to the transposition and thus they favored

superficialization over transposition. If one was to do a very rough meta-analysis and take the range of primary patencies and accumulative patencies from those papers that compare the two techniques that I've just described. Superficialization at about 12 months

for its primary patency will run about 57% range, 50-60 and transposition 53%, with a range of 49-80. So in the range of transposition area, there is a lot of people that may not be a well matched population, which may make meta-analysis in this area somewhat questionable.

But, if you get good results, you get good results. The cumulative patency, however, comes out to be closer in both groups at 78% for superficialization and 80% for transposition. So basilic vein transposition is a successful configuration. One or two stage procedures appear

to carry equally successful outcomes when appropriate selection criteria are used and the one the surgeon is most favored to use and is comfortable with. Primary patency of superficialization despite some papers, if one looks across the entire literature is equivalent to transposition.

Cumulative patency of superficialization is equivalent to transposition. And there is, appears to be no apparent difference in complications, maturation, or access duration. Thank you so much.

- Thank you Louie, that title was a little too long for me, so I just shortened it. I have nothing to disclose. So Takayasu's arteritis is an inflammatory large vessel vasculitis of unknown origin. Originally described by Dr. Takayasu in young Japanese females.

The in-di-gence in North America is fairly rare. And its inflammation of the vessel wall that leads to stenosis, occlusion or aneurysmal formation. Just to review, the Mayo Clinic Bypass Series for Takayasu's, which was presented last year, basically it's 51 patients, and you can see

the mean age was 38. And you can see the breakdown based on race. If you look at the early complication rate and we look at specific graft complications, you had two patients who passed away, you had two occlusions, one stenosis, one graft infection.

And one patient ruptured from an aneurysm at a distant site than where the bypass was performed. If you look at the late complications, specifically graft complications, it's approximately 40%. Now this is a long mean follow up: this is 74 months, a little over six years.

But again, these patients recur and their symptoms can occur and the grafts are not perfect. No matter what we do we do not get superb results. So, look at the graft outcomes by disease activity. We had 50 grafts we followed long-term. And if you look at the patency, primary patency

right here of active disease versus non-ac it's significantly different. If you look at the number of re-interventions it's also significantly different. So basically, active disease does a lot worse

than non-active disease. And by the way, one of our findings was that ESR is not a great indicator of active disease. So we're really at a loss as to what to follow for active or non-active disease. And that's a whole 'nother talk maybe for another year.

So should endovascular therapy be used for Takayasu's? I'd say yes. But where and when? And let's look at the data. And I have to say, this is almost blasphemy for me

to say this, but yes it should be used. So let's look at some of the larger series in literature and just share them. 48 patients with aortic stenosis fro all were treated with PTA stenting.

All were pre-dilated in a graded fashion. So they started with smaller balloons and worked up to larger balloons and they used self expanding stents in all of them. The results show one dissection, which was treated by multiple stents and the patient went home.

And one retro-paret-tin bleed, which was self limiting, requiring transfusion. Look at the mean stenosis with 81% before the intervention. Following the intervention it was 15%. Systolic gradient: 71 milligrams of mercury versus 14. Kind of very good early results.

Looking at the long term results, ABI pre was .75, increased to .92. Systolic blood pressure dropped significantly. And the number of anti-hypertensive meds went from three to 1.1. Let's look at renal arteries stenosis.

All had a renal artery stenosis greater than 70%. All had uncontrolled hypertension. They were followed with MRI or Doppler follow up of the renal arteries. So, stents were used in 84% of the patients. Restenosis occurred in 50% of them.

They were, all eight were treated again, two more developed restenosis, they ended up losing one renal artery. So at eight years follow up, there's a 94% patency rate. What about supra-aortic lesions? And these are lesions that scare me the most for endovascular interventions.

Carotids, five had PTA, two had PTA plus stent. Subclavian, three PTA, two PTA. One Innominate, one PTA plus stent. One early minor stroke. I always challenge what a minor stroke is? I guess that's one that happens to your ex mother-in-law

rather than your mother, but we'll leave it that way. Long term patency at three years, 86%. Secondary patency at three years, 76%. Fairly good patency. So when Endo for Takayasu's, non-active disease is best. The patient is unfit for open surgery.

I believe short, concentric lesions do better. In active disease, if you have to an urgent or emergent, accept the short term success as a bridge to open repair. If you're going to do endovascular, use graded balloons or PTAs, start small. Supra-aortic location, short inflation times

I think are safer. And these three, for questions for the future. I guess for the VEITHsymposium in three years. Thank you.

- So, I'm going to probably echo many of the themes that Gary just touched upon here. These are my disclosures. So, if we look at the CHEST guidelines on who should get pharmacomechanical techniques, it is very very very sobering, and I apologize if the previous speakers have shown this slide,

but essentially, what's right now being disseminated to the American College of CHEST Physicians is that nobody should get catheter-directed thrombolysis, the concept of pharmacomechanical technique should really only reserved as a last-ditch effort if nothing else works, if you happen to have somebody

with extraordinary expertise in your institution, it could not be more of a damning recommendation for what I'm about to talk to you about for the next eight or nine minutes or so. So, then the question is, what is the rationale? What are we talking about here?

And again, I'm going to say that Gary and I, I think are sort of kindred spirits in recognizing that we really do need to mature this concept of the catheter-based technique for pulmonary embolism. So, I'm going to put out a hypothetical question, what if there was a single session/single device therapy

for acute PE, Gary showed one, that could avoid high dose lytics, avoid an overnight infusion, acutely on the table lower the PA pressure, acutely improve the function of the right ventricle, rapidly remove, you know, by angiography,

thrombus and clot from the pulmonary artery, and it was extremely safe, what if we had that? Would that change practice? And I would respectfully say, yes it would. And then what if this concept has already been realized, and we're actually using this across the world

for STEMI, for stroke, for acute DVT, and so why not acute pulmonary embolism? What is limiting our ability to perform single session, rapid thrombus removal and

patient stabilization on the table? Gary showed this slide, there's this whole litany of different devices, and I would argue none of them is exactly perfect yet, but I'm going to try and sort of walk you through what has been developed in an attempt

to reach the concept of single session therapy. When we talk about pharmacomechanical thrombectomy or thrombo-aspiration, it really is just one line item on the menu of all the different things that we can offer patients that present with acutely symptomatic PE, but it is important to recognize

what the potential benefits of this technology are and, of course, what the limitations are. When we look at this in distinction to stroke or STEMI or certainly DVT, it's important to recognize that during a surgical pulmonary embolectomy case, the clot that's able to be extracted is quite impressive,

and this is a very very very sobering amount of material that is typically removed from the patient's right heart and their pulmonary circulation, so, in order to innovate and iterate a percutaneous technology based on existing concepts,

it really does demand significant disruption to achieve the goals, we have not tackled this yet in terms of our endovascular tool kit. So, what is the role? Well, it's potentially able to debulk in acute PE, in an intermediate risk patient which would

ideally eliminate the need for overnight lysis, as Gary alluded to, but what if it could actually replace surgical embolectomy in high risk patients? I think many of us have had the conversation where we, we sort of don't know that's there a

experienced, comfortable surgeon to do an embolectomy within the building or within immediate access to the patient that we see crashing in front of our eyes. I'm very very lucky here in New York that I've incredible cardiovascular surgeons that are able to perform this procedure very very safely 24/7,

but I know that's not the case across the country. So, one of our surgeons who actually came from the Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston developed this concept, which was the sort of first bridge between surgical embolectomy and percutaneous therapy, which is a large bore aspiration catheter,

it's a 22 French cannula that was originally designed to be placed through a cutdown but can now be placed percutaneously, and I think many of us in the room are familiar with this technology, but essentially you advance this under fluoroscopy into the right heart,

place the patient on venous-venous bypass, and a trap, which is outside the patient, is demonstrated in the lower left portion of the screen here, is able to capture any thrombotic material and then restore the circulation via the contralateral femoral vein,

any blood that is aspirated. Very very scant data on this, here's the experience from Michael and Kenny up in Boston where they tried this technology in just a handful of cases, this was followed by John Moriarty's experience from UCLA, where he actually argued a little bit of caution

using this technology, largely related to its inability to safely and reliably deliver it to the pulmonary circulation. To that end, AngieDynamics is funding a prospective registry really looking at safety and efficacy at delivering this device to the pulmonary circulation

and its ability to treat acute pulmonary embolism as well as any right heart clot, but that data's not commercially available yet. This is just one case that we did recently of a clot in transit, which I would argue could not be treated with any other technology

and the patient was able to be discharged the same day, I personally think this is a wonderful application of this technology and is our default strategy right now for a very large clot in transit. The second entrance to the space is the Inari FlowTriever device, which is a 20 French cannula,

it does not require a perfusion team in vein-vein bypass, the concept is simple, a 20 French guide catheter is advanced into the pulmonary circulation and these trilobed disks, which function like a stentriever for stroke are deployed in the pulmonary circulation, retracted to allow the clot to be delivered to the guide cath,

and then using manual aspiration, the clot is retrieved from the patient. Just a few case reports in small series describing this, this one in JACC two years ago, showing quite robust ability to extract a clot, this company which is a relatively small company funded a

single-arm prospective trial enrolling 168 patients, and not only did they complete enrollment last year, but they actually received FDA approval, now there is no peer-reviewed literature on this, it has undergone public presentation, but we, we really don't know exactly which patients were treated,

and so we really can't dissect this, I think there is a learning curve to this technology, and it's not, certainly, ready for broad dissemination yet, we just don't know which patients are ideal for it currently. Another technology, the Penumbra CAT8 system,

a market reduction in the size, an 8 French catheter based technology, this is exact same technology that's used for thrombo-aspiration for acute ischemic stroke, currently just in a slightly different size, and then a number of cases demonstrating its efficacy at

alleviating the acute nonperfusion of an entire lobe, as Gary was referring to previously, and this is one of our cases from our own lab, where you see there's no perfusion of the right, middle and lower lobe, I'm not sure if I can get these movies to play here, oh here it goes,

and so using sort of a handmade separator, we were able to restore perfusion again to the right, middle and lower lobe here, so just one example where, I think there is a potential benefit of thrombo-aspiration in a completely occluded segment.

There has been a wealth of literature about this technology, mostly demonstrating safety and efficacy, the most recent one on the bottom right in CVIR demonstrates the ability to acutely reduce the PA pressures on the table with the use of this technology, and to that end,

Akhi Sista, our faculty here this morning, is the national principal investigator of a US multicenter prospective study looking at exactly that, to try and prove that this technology is safe and effective in the treatment of submassive pulmonary embolism, so more to come on that.

Lastly, the AngioJet System, probably the most reported and studied technology, this is a 6 French technology by default, a wealth of literature here showing safety and efficacy, however, due to adverse event reporting, this technology currently has black box label warnings

in the treatment of acute pulmonary embolism, so clearly this technology should not be used by the novice, and there are significant safety concerns largely related to bradyarrhythmias and hypotension, that being said, again, it is a quite experienced technology for this. So where do we currently stand?

I think we clearly see there are several attributes for thrombo-aspiration including just suction aspiration, a mechanical stent-triever technology, and the ability to not just insanguinate the patient but actually restore circulation and not make the patient anemic, here,

you can see where these technologies are going in terms of very very large bore and very small bore, I placed the question marked right in the center which is where I think this technology needs to converge in order to lead to the disruption for the broad adoption of a single session technology.

So, numerous devices exist, all the devices have been used clinically and have demonstrated the ability to be delivered in aspirary pulmonary embolus, at present, unfortunately there is no consensus regarding which device should be used for which patients and in which clinical presentations,

we need many prospective studies to demonstrate the safety and clinical benefit for our patients, we desperately do need a single session therapy, again, I completely agree with Gary on this, but there is a lot of work yet to do. Thank you for your attention.

- So this is what I've been assigned to do, I think this is a rich topic so I'll just get into it. Here are my disclosures. So I hope to convince you at the end of this talk that what we need for massive PE when we're talking about catheter based therapy is a prospective registry. And what we need for catheter based therapy for

submassive PE is a randomized controlled trial. So we'll start with massive PE and my rational for this. So you know, really as you've heard, the goal of massive PE treatment is to rescue these patients from death. They have a 25 to 65% chance of dying

so our role, whatever type of physician we are, is to rescue that patient. So what are our tools to rescue that patient? You've heard about some of them already, intravenous thrombolysis, surgical embolectomy, and catheter directed therapy.

The focus of my talk will be catheter directed therapy but let's remember that the fastest and easiest thing to do for these patients is to give them intravenous thrombolysis. And I think we under utilize this therapy and we need to think about this as a first line therapy for massive PE.

However, there's some patients in whom thrombolytics are contraindicated or in whom they fail and then we have to look at some other options. And that's where catheter directed therapy may play a role. So I want to show you a pretty dramatic case and this was an eye-opening case for me

and sort of what launched our PERT when I was at Cornell. It's a 30 year old man, transcranial resection of a pituitary tumor post-op seizures and of course he had a frontal lobe hemorrhage at that time. Sure enough, four or five days after this discovery

he developed hypertension and hypoxia. And then is he CT of the chest, which I still remember to this day because it was so dramatic. You see this caval thrombosis right, basically a clot in transit

and this enormous clot in the right main pulmonary artery. And of course he was starting to get altered, tachycardiac and a little bit hypotensive. So the question is, what to do with this patient with an intracranial hemorrhage? Obviously, systemic thrombolytics are

contraindicated in him. His systolics were in the 90 millimeter of mercury ranged, getting more altered and tachycardiac. He was referred for a CDT and he was brought to the IR suite. And really, at this point,

you could see the multidisciplinary nature of PE. The ICU attending was actively managing him while I was getting access and trying to do my work. So this was the initial pulmonary angiogram you can see there's absolutely no flow to the right lung even with a directed injection

you see this cast of thrombus there. Tried a little bit of aspiration, did a little bit of maceration, even injected a little TPA, wasn't getting anywhere. I was getting a little bit more panicked as he was getting more panicked

and I remembered this device that I had used in AV fistula work called the Cleaner. Totally off label use here, I should disclose that and I have no interest in the company, no financial interest in the company. And so we deployed this thing, activate it a few times,

it spins at 3,000 rpm's, he coughed a little bit, and that freaked us all out also. But low and behold we actually started seeing some profusion. And you can see it in the aortogram actually in this and that's the whole point of massive PE treatment with CDT,

is try to get forward flow into the left ventricle so that you have a systemic blood pressure. Now, you know, when we talk about catheter based therapies we have all sorts of things at our disposal. And my point to you is that you know really, thank you...

You guys can see that, great. So really, the point of these catheter therapies is that you can throw the kitchen sink at massive PE because basically your role is to try to help this patient live. So, if I can get this thing to show up again.

There we go. It's not working very well, sorry. So, from clockwise we have the AngioVac circuit, you have, let's see if this will work again, okay. Nope, it's got a delay. So then you have your infusion catheter,

then you have the Inari FlowTriever, you saw the Cleaner in the previous cast, and you have the Penumbra aspiration device the CAT 8. And some of these will be spoken about in more detail in subsequent talks. But really, you can throw the kitchen sink at massive PE

just to do whatever it takes to get profusion to the left side. So, the best analysis that has been done so far was Will Kuo in 2009. He conducted a meta-analysis of about 594 patients and he found this clinical success rate of 86.5%.

This basically meant these patients survived to 30 days. Well, if that we're the case, that's a much lower mortality than we've seen historically we should basically be doing catheter directed therapy for every single massive PE that comes into the hospital. But I think we have to remember with this meta-analysis

that only 94 of these patients came from prospective studies, 500 came from retrospective, single center studies. So even though it was a very well conducted meta-analysis, the substrate for this meta-analysis wasn't great. And I think my point to you is that

we really are going to have a hard time studying this in a prospective fashion. So what is the data, as far as massive PE tell us and not tell us? Techniques are available to remove thrombus, it can be used if systemic lysis is contraindicated,

but it doesn't tell us whether catheter based therapies are better than the other therapies. Whether they should be used in combination with them and which patients should get catheter based therapy, which should get surgery and which techniques are most effective and safe.

Now, I think something we have to remember is that massive PE has a 5% incidence which is probably a good thing, if this was even higher than that we would have even more of an epidemic on our hand. But this is what makes massive PE very difficult to study.

So, if you looked at a back of the envelope calculation an RCT is just not feasible. So in an 800 bed hospital, you have 200 PE's per year, 5% are massive which means you get 10 per year in that hospital, assume 40% enroll which is actually generous,

that means that 4 massive PE's per year per institution. And then what are you going to do? Are you going to randomize them to IV lytics versus surgery versus interventional therapy, a three arm study, what is the effect size, what difference do you expect between these therapies

and how would you power it? It's really an impossible question. So I do want to make the plug for a Massive PE Prospective Registry. I think something like the PERT consortium is very well-suited to run something like this

especially with this registry endeavors. Detailed baseline characteristics including all these patients, detailing the intervention and looking at both short and long-term outcomes. Moving on to submassive PE. As you've heard much more controversial,

a much more difficult question. ICOPER as you already heard from the previous talk, alerted the world to RV dysfunction which this right ventricular hypokinesis conferring a higher mortality at 90 days than no RV dysfunction. And that's where PEITHO came in as you heard.

This showed that the placebo group met the primary endpoint of hemodynamic decompensation more commonly than the Tenecteplase group. Of course, coming at the risk of higher rate of major bleeding and intracranial hemorrhage. So I just want to reiterate what was just said

which is that systemic thrombolysis has a questionable risk benefit profile and most patients with submassive PE, as seen in the guideline documents as well. So that sort of opens a sort of door for catheter directed therapy.

Is this the next therapy to overcome some of the shortcomings of systemic thrombolysis? Well what we have in terms of CDT is these four trials, Ultima, Seattle II, Optalyse, and Perfect. Three of these trails were the ultrasound assisted catheter, the Ekos catheter.

And only one of them is randomized and that's the Ultima trial. I'm going to show you just one slide from each one of them. The Ultima trial is basically the only randomized trial and it showed that if you put catheters in these patients 24 hours later their RV to LV ratio will be lower

than if you just treat them with Heparin. Seattle II is a single arm study and there was an association with the reduction in the RV to LV ratio at 48 hours by CTA. PERFECT, I found this to be the most interesting figure from PERFECT which is that you're going to start it at

systolic pulmonary artery pressure of 51 and you're going to come down to about 37. Optalyse, a brand new study that was just published, four arms each arm has increasing dose associated with it and at 48 hours it didn't matter, all of these groups had a reduction in the RV to LV ratio.

And there was no control group here as well. What is interesting is that the more thrombolytics you used the more thrombus you cleared at 48 hours. What that means clinically is uncertain at this point. There is bleeding with CDT. 11% major bleeding rate in Seattle II,

no intracranial hemorrhages. Optalyse did have five major bleeds, most of the major bleeds happened in the highest dosed arms. So we know that thrombolytics cause bleeding that's still an issue. Now, clot extraction minus fibrinolytic,

this is an interesting question. We do have devices, you're going to hear about the FLARE trial later in this session. EXTRACT-PE is ongoing which we have enrolled about 75 patients into. What the data does and does not tell us

when it comes to CDT for submassive PE it probably reduces the RV to LV ratio at 24 hours, it's associated with a reduction at 48 hours, major bleeding is seen, we do not know what the short and long-term clinical outcomes are

following CDT for submassive PE. Whether it should be routinely used in submassive PE and in spite of the results of Optalyse this is a preliminary trial, we don't know the optimal dose and duration of thrombolytic drug. And even is spite of these early trials

on these non-lytic techniques, we don't know their true role yet. I'd liked to point out that greater than 1,600 patients have been randomized in systemic lytic trails yet only 59 have been randomized in a single, non-U.S. CDT trial.

So this means that you can randomize patients with submassive PE to one treatment or the other. And we want to get away from this PERT CDT roller coaster where you get enthusiasm, you do more cases, then you have a complication, then the number of cases drops.

You want that to be consistent because you're basing it on data. And that's where we're trying to come up with a way of answering that with this PE-TRACT trial. Which is a RCT of CDT versus no-CDT. We're looking at clinical endpoints

rather than radiographic ones greater than 400 patients, 30 to 50 sites across the country. So in summary I hope I've convinced you that we need a Prospective Registry for massive PE and a Randomized Controlled Trail for submassive PE. Thank you.

- Thank you, Mr. Chairman. Good morning ladies and gentleman. I have nothing to disclose. Reportedly, up to 50 percent of TEVARs need a left subclavian artery coverage. It raises a question should revascularization cover the subclavian artery or not?

It will remain the question throughout the brachiograph available to all of us. SVS guidelines recommend routine revascularization in patients who need elective TEVAR with the left subclavian artery coverage. However, this recommendation

was published almost ten years ago based on the data probably even published earlier. So, we did nationwide in patient database analysis, including 7,773 TEVARs and 17% of them had a left subclavian artery revascularization.

As you can see from this slide, the SVS guideline did affect decision making since it was published in 2009, the left subclavian artery revascularization numbers have been significantly increased, however, it's still less than 20%.

As we mentioned, 50% of patient need coverage, but only less than 20% of patient had a revascularization. In the patient group with left subclavian artery revascularization, then we can see the perioperative mortality and morbidities are higher in the patient

who do not need a revascularization. We subgroup of these patient into Pre- and Post-TEVAR revascularization, as you can see. In a Post-TEVAR left subclavian revascularization group, perioperative mortality and major complications are higher than the patient who had a revascularization before TEVAR.

In terms of open versus endovascular revascularization, endovascular group has fewer mortality rate and major complications. It's safer, but open bypass is more effective, and durable in restoring original profusion. In summary, TEVAR with required left subclavian artery

revascularization is associated with higher rates of perioperative mortality and morbidities. Routine revascularization may not be necessary, however, the risks of left subclavian artery coverage must be carefully evaluated before surgery.

Those risk factors are CABG using LIMA. Left arm AV fistula, AV graft for hemodialysis. Dominant left vertebral artery. Occluded right vertebral artery. Significant bilateral carotid stenosis.

Greater than 20% of thoracic aorta is going to be or has been covered. And a history of open or endovascular aneurysm repair. And internal iliac artery occlusion or it's going to be embolized during the procedure. If a patient with those risk factors,

and then we recommend to have a left subclavian artery revascularization, and it should be performed before TEVAR with lower complications. Thank you very much.

- Thank you for introduction. Thanks to Frank Veith for the kind invitation to present here our really primarily single-center experience on this new technique. This is my disclosure. So what you really want

in the thromboembolic acute events is a quick flow restoration, avoid lytic therapies, and reduce the risk of bleeding. And this can be achieved by surgery. However, causal directed local thrombolysis

is much less invasive and also give us a panoramic view and topographic view that is very useful in these cases. But it takes time and is statistically implied

and increases risk of bleeding. So theoretically percutaneous thrombectomy can accomplish all these tasks including a shorter hospital stay. So among the percutaneous thrombectomy devices the Indigo System is based on a really simple

aspiration mechanism and it has shown high success in ischemic stroke. This is one of my first cases with the Indigo System using a 5 MAX needle intervention

adapted to this condition. And it's very easy to understand how is fast and effective this approach to treat intraprocedural distal embolization avoiding potential dramatic clinical consequences, especially in cases like this,

the only one foot vessel. This is also confirmed by this technical note published in 2015 from an Italian group. More recently, other papers came up. This, for example, tell us that

there has been 85% below-the-knee primary endpoint achievement and 54% in above-the-knee lesions. The TIMI score after VAT significantly higher for BTK lesions and for ATK lesions

a necessity of a concomitant endovascular therapy. And James Benenati has already told us the results of the PRISM trials. Looking into our case data very quickly and very superficially we can summarize that we had 78% full revascularization.

In 42% of cases, we did not perform any lytic therapy or very short lytic therapy within three hours. And in 36% a long lytic therapy was necessary, however within 24 hours. We had also 22% failure

with three surgery necessary and one amputation. I must say that among this group of patients, twenty patients, there were also patients like this with extended thrombosis from the groin to the ankle

and through an antegrade approach, that I strongly recommend whenever possible, we were able to lower the aspiration of the clots also in the vessel, in the tibial vessels, leaving only this region, thrombosis

needed for additional three hour infusion of TPA achieving at the end a beautiful result and the patient was discharged a day after. However not every case had similar brilliant result. This patient went to surgery and he went eventually to amputation.

Why this? And why VAT perform better in BTK than in ATK? Just hypotheses. For ATK we can have unknown underlying chronic pathology. And the mismatch between the vessel and the catheter can be a problem.

In BTK, the thrombus is usually soft and short because it is an acute iatrogenic event. Most importantly is the thrombotic load. If it is light, no short, no lytic or short lytic therapy is necessary. Say if heavy, a longer lytic therapy and a failure,

regardless of the location of the thrombosis, must be expected. So moving to the other topic, venous occlusive thrombosis. This is a paper from a German group. The most exciting, a high success rate

without any adjunctive therapy and nine vessels half of them prosthetic branch. The only caution is about the excessive blood loss as a main potential complication to be checked during and after the procedure. This is a case at my cath lab.

An acute aortic renal thrombosis after a open repair. We were able to find the proximate thrombosis in this flush occlusion to aspirate close to fix the distal stenosis

and the distal stenosis here and to obtain two-thirds of the kidney parenchyma on both sides. And this is another patient presenting with acute mesenteric ischemia from vein thrombosis.

This device can be used also transsympatically. We were able to aspirate thrombi but after initial improvement, the patient condition worsened overnight. And the CT scan showed us a re-thrombosis of the vein. Probably we need to learn more

in the management of these patients especially under the pharmacology point of view. And this is a rapid overview on our out-of-lower-limb case series. We had good results in reimplanted renal artery, renal artery, and the pulmonary artery as well.

But poor results in brachial artery, fistula, and superior mesenteric vein. So in conclusion, this technology is an option for quick thromboembolic treatment. It's very effective for BTK intraprocedural embolic events.

The main advantage is a speeding up the blood flow and reestablishing without prolonged thrombolysis or reducing the dosage of the thrombolysis. Completely cleaning up extensive thromobosed vessels is impossible without local lytic therapies. This must be said very clearly.

Indigo technology is promising and effective for treatment of acute renovisceral artery occlusion and sub massive pulmonary embolism. Thank you for your attention. I apologize for not being able to stay for the discussion

because I have a flight in a few hours. Thank you very much.

- Sam, Louis, thank you very much. I also kind of reduced the title to make it fit in a slide. Those are my disclosures. We've switched to using a hybrid room routinely a couple of years ago and what happened then is that we started using 3D imaging

to guide us during the procedure using a fusion overlay. Obviously this was a huge benefit but the biggest benefit was actually 3D imaging at the end of the procedure so rather than doing an AP fluoro run, we would do a 3D acquisition in a cone beam CT

and have those reconstructions available to check technical success and to fix any issues. We've been using this technique to perform translumbar type 2 endoleak treatment and what we do is we do a cone beam CT non contrast and we fuse the pre-op CT on top of this cone beam CT

and it's actually quite easy to do because you can do it with the spine but also obviously with the endograft so it's a registration on the graft on top of the endograft and then the software is really straightforward. You just need to define a target in the middle

of the endoleak. You need to define where you want to puncture the skin and then the system will automatically generate to you a bull-eye view which is a view where you puncture the back of the patient and the progression view you obviously see the needle

go all the way to your target. And what is interesting is that if you reach the target and if you don't have a backflow so you're not in the endoleak, you have this stereo 3D software which is interesting because you do two lateral fluoro runs

and then you check the position of the needle and then it shows you on the pre-op CT where you are. So here in this specific patient, I didn't advance the needle far enough. I was still in the aortic wall,

that's why I didn't get backflow so I just slightly advanced the needle and I got backflow and I could finish the embolization by injecting contrast, close and then ONYX to completely exclude this type 2 endoleak. So now let's go to our focus today is fenestrated endograft.

You see this patient that were treated with a fenestration and branches. You can see that the selective angio in the left renal looks really good but if on the cone beam CT at the end of the procedure we actually had a kink on the left renal stent

so because I had depicted it right away at the end of the procedure I could fix it right away so this is not a secondary procedure. This is done during the index procedure so I'll go directly to what we did is we reinflated a ballon,

we re-fed the balloon and then had a nice result but what happen if you actually fail to catheterize? This was the case in this patient. You see the left renal stent is completely collapsed. I never managed to get a wire from the aortic lumen and back into the renal artery

so we position the patient in the lateral position, did a cone beam CT and used the same software so the target is now the renal artery just distal to this crushed renal stent and we punctured this patient back in the target and so you can see is right here

and you can see that the puncturing the back. We've reached the renal artery, pushed a wire through the stent now in the artery lumen and snared the wire and over this through and through wire coming out from the back we managed

to reopen this kinked left renal stent. You can see here the result from this procedure and this was published a couple of years, two years ago. Now another example, you can see here the workflow. I'm actually advancing the needle in the back

of the patient, looking at the screen and you can see in this patient that had a longer renal stent I actually punctured the renal stent right away because at the end of the procedure I positioned another covered stent inside

to exclude this puncture site and then, oops sorry, and then, can we go to the, yeah great thank you. And then I advance the wire again through this kinked renal stent into the endograft lumen and this is a snare from the groin

and I got the wire out from the groin. So you see the wire is coming from the back of the patient here, white arrow, to the groin, red arrow and this is the same patient another view and over this through and through wire

we manged to re advance and reopen this stent and we actually kinked the stent by getting the system of branched endograft through a previous fenestrated repair and fortunately my fellow told me at the end of the procedure we should check the FEVAR

with a cone beam CT and this is how we depicted this kink. So take home message, it's a very easy, straightforward workflow. It's a dedicated workflow that we use for type 2 endoleak embolization. We have this intermediate assessment with Stereo 3D

that helps us to check where we are so with 3D imaging after the learning curve it's become routine and we have new workflows like this way of salvaging a kinked renal stent. Thank you very much for your attention.

- Thank you Dr. Melissano for the kind interaction. TEVAR is the first option, or first line therapy for many pathologies of the thoracic aorta. But, it is not free from complications and two possible complications of the arch are the droop effect and the bird-beak. I was very interested as Gore came up with the new

Active Control System of the graft. The main features of this graft, of this deployment system are that the deployment is staged and controlled in putting in the graft at the intermediate diameter and then to the full diameter. The second important feature is that we can

optionally modify the angulation of the graft once the graft is in place. Was very, very interesting. This short video shows how it works. You see the graft at the intermediate diameter, we can modify the angulation also during this stage

but it's not really used, and then the expansion of the graft at the full diameter and the modification of the angulation, if we wished. This was one of the first cases done at our institution. A patient with an aneurysm after Type B dissection. You see the graft in place and you see the graft after

partial deployment and full deployment. Perhaps you can appreciate, also, a gap between the graft and the lesser curvature of the arch, which could be corrected with the angulation. As you can see here, at the completion angiography we have an ideal positioning of the graft inside the arch.

Our experience consisted only on 43 cases done during the last months. Mostly thoracic aneurysm, torn abdominal aneurysm, and patients with Type B aortic dissection. The results were impressive. No mortality, technical success, 100%,

but we had four cases with problems at the access probably due to the large bore delivery system as you can see here. No conversion, so far and no neurological injury in this patient group. We have some patients who came up for the six months follow-up and you see here we detected one Type 1b endoleak,

corrected immediately with a new graft. Type II endoleak which should be observed. This was our experience, but Gore has organized all the registry, the Surpass Registry, which is a prospective, single-arm, post market registry including 125 patients and all these patients

have been already included in these 20 centers in seven different countries in Europe. This was the pathology included, very thorough and generous, and also the landing zone was very different, including zone two down to zone five. The mean device used per patient were 1.3.

In conclusion, ladies and gentlemen, the Active Control System of the well known CTAG is a really unique system to achieve an ideal positioning of the graft. We don't need to reduce the blood pressure aggressively during the deployment because of the intermediate diameter

reached and the graft angulation can be adjusted in the arch. But, it's not reversible. Thank you very much for your attention.

- Thank you very much Raul and our co-chair and also Frank Veith for inviting me again. I'm going to tell you a little bit about flow augmentation. And I have no disclosures related to this. Well, flow augmentation after venous stenting for venous obstruction potentially improves outcome. That's a statement that is

most of the people will support that. Important characteristic of noninvasive compression device after venous stenting is that they improve blood flow inside the newly stented patient,

they stimulate the calf pump muscle, and they're a synergistic tool along anticoagulation, and to decrease the risk for re-occlusion. Well, there are flow devices. Most of the people I think use intermittent pneumatic calf compression

for a few days after the procedure. That can be done but there are now neuromuscular stimulating devices like the FlowAid and the Geko device to stimulate nerves and then the calf won't contract. The physiologic effects of intermittent

pneumatic compression are there. They had been analyzed significantly. There's a decrease of venous stasis and venous pressure, increase flow, increase fibrinolysis, and the blood volume is better and the venous emptying is better.

There's an increased endothelial shear stress, increased the A-V pressure gradient, and there's a decrease in incidence of thrombosis. Those are already published in several papers. Well, what about the neurostimulation device? We have the FlowAid.

FlowAid is a battery powdered neuromuscular electro-stimulation device designed to increase blood flow in the veins. And again this also shows the sequential pattern of neuromuscular electrical stimulation at the calf and causes the calf muscle pump to expel blood

and increase venous, arterial, and microcirculatory blood flow. While these analyses have all been done with healthy volunteers and they show a better outcome then also in intermittent pneumatic compression.

The same is for the Geko device. It's a device which you put along and you stimulate the peroneal nerve, you get a calf contraction. And this also showed in several papers in healthy volunteers that it improves

venous flow, arterial flow, and microcirculatory flow. But it's all analyzed in healthy volunteers, so we said, well, let's do like a short pilot study and see if for even patient with PTS we get the same results, and we looked at that.

But we did a very short pilot in seven patients. We stopped it because we saw already that we need a bigger study, but I will just explain to you what we found in those seven patients. We measured the flow velocity and volume

before and after stenting in the iliac tract to see if we have the increased flow in the common femoral vein in those PTS patients. These are the seven patients, and as you can see it's important

that they don't have a VCSS of 6.4, and the diseased leg, and less than one in the healthy leg, and the Villalta scores will show above 11 on average. So those patients were analyzed and this is what you see. You see

the velocity in the femoral vein before stenting at baseline is, can I point it, yeah, okay, is here. That you see there's a very low velocity. You can increase the velocity with the neurostimulation but there's a higher velocity increase

with the intermittent pneumatic compression. After stenting you see luckily that the velocity has increased, and the stimulation of the neuromuscular is indeed also higher, but the intermittent

pneumatic compression does better. If you look at the volume flow, of course before the treatment, it's low, 32 cc a minute, and then you get an increase with the Geko and an increase with the intermittent

pneumatic compression which is much higher. And after stenting you see that it also improves, you see luckily the stent procedure was successful because we have a much higher flow rate than before the stent procedure. So in conclusion in the literature and the pilot studies

said that neurostimulatory devices have a proven good augmented blood flow in healthy subjects, even better than IPC devices, but there's no experience in PTS patients yet. So this small pilot study shows that the results obtained in healthy subjects

cannot be extrapolated to PTS patients or patients with post stent situations, therefore we are conducting now two randomized studies to compare FlowAid with IPC and the Geko device with IPC, and to see for if this has use, because why is this important?

A potential benefit of the neurostimulation is that you can use it mobile and 24/7 instead of with the IPC procedure which you can only use in a bedridden patient. So if it is as good as or close to, you can use it for a few weeks after stenting

to get the flow up and running and that you have less early stent occlusions. We are also analyzing for if it can replace AV fistula which we do after end of phlebectomies and to prevent really early re-occlusion. And as I said we need those studies to be done

but that the important message is that we don't go home with the fact that those devices, although in healthy volunteers show a very good outcome, they have to be tested in patients with PTS. Thank you very much.

- Yes, thank you very much. And it's a pleasure to discuss this topic. My disclosure's obvious. And I want, this is the layout and I want to start with some sensible arguments that tell us to chose the best option for our patients and that we have to take extension of disease

into consideration. And for those patients who expect to live longer go for a durable repair. And I want to show you a quick few examples that are important. This is a standard fenestrated graft with a type one

endoleak so an indication mistake that we had to repair with a very complex graft within a branches. And fortunately it went well and now it seals off completely. This is another case and again this standard EVAR. It should probably have never been done.

You can see where the graft lies. And we look at the proximal sealing zone and we like to look at the sagittal images and we want to have a durable repair and here because it's fairly easy we do a full fenestration graft.

This is another case and again I'm appealing at be careful with your indications. You can see the aneurysm and you look at the infrarenal neck while for us this is not a infrarenal neck at all. This is a diseased Aorta. And where in the old days we would probably have done

a standard FEVAR we now aim look at the red line for a longer sealing zone to make sure that it is durable. And this is the CT Scan at five years. You can now probably say that this aneurysm has been cured as this proximal landing zone has been stable for all these years.

And almost the same case with one little difference you can see the infrarenal neck that it none existing. You can see the sagittal view, it seems to tell you yes, a triple FEVAR will work. But we didn't take into account that the descending Thoracic Aorta was dilated.

You can see it here, 36, 37 millimeters. And we planned this triple FEVAR, we were happy with it. But if you follow this patient you will see that if he lives long enough this is not a suitable landing zone. So we should have done a more impressive repair going a little bit higher

because this is a complex case to repair. And we repaired it with another fenestrated graft up to the Thoracic Aorta, as you can see it's not easy. And the end result was fine but this of course is a far more complex and extensive repair. I don't know if I jumped one, yes.

So a little bit of scientific evidence because we moved away from double fenestrated towards triple fenestrated and we asked ourselves is triple and quadruple fenestrated associated with a higher mortality and mobility? And you can see our series here and the updated figures with more than 200 patients in each arm.

But more importantly look at the changes overtime. A standard fenestrated repair in blue has virtually disappeared in our center. And that is because we aim to have a longer sealing zone. You can see the evolution of the sealing zone going from so to speak 25 millimeters to 45 millimeters

to make sure that these patients have a durable repair. If you look at the results while it's fairly simple because there are no statistical significant differences with regard to technical success 30-day mortality was 0.7% in 454 patients so no statistical differences.

You can imagine the target vessel patency are fine. We only have two problems with a SMA, one with each group and all the other SMA's are doing very well. And actually interestingly, no difference in freedom from re-intervention. And if you look at the estimated survival

interestingly at three years the survival was higher in the complex group compared to the standard FEVAR group. But the over statistics don't show any difference of course. So really, my take home message and the lessons we learnt is that standard EVAR not FEVAR, standard EVAR should only be done in good neck anatomy.

For us, triple FEVAR has replaced double FEVAR and if you have problems higher up you better start immediately with quadruple FEVAR to be able to extend later. And the goal of all of that is to achieve more durable results

and an easier repair in case of extension of disease. Thank you very much for your attention.

- Jim, thanks so much, and thanks to Doctor Veith for the opportunity to get involved. Here's my disclosure. So, certainly you don't want to be an expert on limb thromboses, however, it happens. And so, when you see these patients, no longer are we looking at fem-fem,

or even lytics, catheter-directed lytics. So how do we get from screen left to screen right in a single session therapy? Well, as we know, when these patients present, there's several different management options. You can do open thrombectomy with or without

a fem-fem, pharmacomechanical thrombectomy. There's catheter delytic and ultrasound accelerated thrombolytics, and then now, today, we have vacuum-assisted thrombectomy, as we've heard throughout this session, or continuous aspiration thrombectomy,

however you want to mention it. Regardless, when you end up with lytics, this is exactly what you're dealin' with. You're playing with fire, and if we do it long enough, you're going to see this complication. So we've really adopted a clot extraction

instead of a clot dissolution policy at our institution. I think Jim just showed you this technique that is afforded to us by the Indigo thrombectomy system, as you can see here in a Vivo model, this catheter actually does work extremely well.

It'll remove this soft thrombus, as you can see here. My first experience with this was actually for an occluded popliteal stent, as you can see here. We had a occlusion of the standard nitinol stent. This aspiration power was incredibly surprising to me. As you can see, it collapsed the standard nitinol stent.

So at that point, several years ago, we realized how good this device was, and how we want to minimize lytics for our folks. So we started in 2014 and recently this year at the Midwest Vascular forum in Saint Louis, we presented our data.

At that time, we had 73 patients over the years with acute limb ischemia. And here you can see the breakdown. For this presentation I'm going to focus on this cohort here, which is seven. But as you can see, like my panelists here,

we use it for occlusions, for not only occlusions but emboli as well, and also we had one case of an upper extremity embolism that we were able to successfully treat with this device. At that time, again, looking at all 73 patients,

you can see here that it's a very efficacious device. There were a couple folks who needed transfusion and perhaps the blood loss was a little higher than 300. However, as you can see here, the folks who had a blood loss, all five had open adjunctive interventions as well, and the ones who needed transfusion

all had catheter directed lytics as adjunctive therapy. As far as our efficacy endpoints, what we looked at was antegrade flow. As you can see here, oftentimes with your vacuum system thrombectomy, you're able to get antegrade flow. However, intermittently there's also other

adjunctive therapies that we had to use frequently as well. Going back to what, you know, my topic for today, how do you go from screen left to screen right, where here you can see one of our patients who came in. We did a retrograde ipsilateral stick,

crossed the lesion with the wire, then we delivered our eight french Indigo catheter and were able to get, in a single session, as you can see here, antegrade flow. So here's another, all this in one single session therapy. Here's another patient of ours.

As you can see to the left, one of our Gore Excluder limbs had occluded, and again, with single session therapy we were able to provide patency to that occluded right limb. Another case here, you can see one of our other Medtronic grafts.

And what you'll see here as you're looking to the right, here we are with our eight french Indigo catheter, is the separator, which is like a pipe cleaner. And we were able to clear out this clot and provide patency to this

all in a single session therapy. And again, here you can see from left to right how we were able to thrombectomize that limb. So over the years, the last three years, we do about 80 to 90 EVARs a year. During that time period, we have seven patients

come in with limb occlusions. And as you can see here, four of them were chronic, three claudicants and one res-pain, and three of them were acute limb Rutherford one, two A or two B. As you can see here, 42% of the time for these

occluded limbs, we were able to do it with no lytics, not even a pulse spray, nothing, not one drop of lytics. As you can see here, some of them we did have to do it in a single session. What we do is use a McNamara catheter.

We would squirt out, you know, anywhere from, as you can see, 14 to 18 milligrams of lytics, go get a cup of coffee, go make rounds, come back 20 minutes later, then utilize your device. And again, you can see, in a single session therapy we were able to afford patency.

And then finally, you can see here the blood loss was minimal. So this is a safe device. So in conclusion, I think that single session therapy is safe. It can facilitate achieving antegrade flow

in the management of stent graft limb occlusions. And single session therapy is the future of not only stent graft limb occlusions but all acute limb ischemia. Thanks so much.

- This is from some work in collaboration with my good friend, Mike Dake. And, a couple of years of experience at Stanford now. First described by Kazy? years ago. This technical note of using multiple main-body endographs in a sandwich formation.

Up at the top but, then yielding multiple branches to get out to the visceral vessels and leaving one branch for a bifurcated graft. We've sort of modified it a little bit and generally either use multiple

grafts in order to create a branch the celiac and SMA. Left the celiac sometimes for a chimney, but the strategy really has been in one of the limbs to share both renals and the limb that goes down to the legs. We noticed early on that this really was not for

non-operative candidates, only for urgent cases and we recognize that the visceral branches were the most important to be in their own limb. I'll just walk you through a case. 6.8 centimeter stent for foraco above

the prior opened repair. The plan drawn out here with multiple main bodies and a second main body inside in order to create the multiple branches. The first piece goes in. It's balloon molded at the level of pulmonary

vein with enough length so that the ipsalateral limb is right next to the celiac. And we then, from above get into that limb and down into the celiac vessel and extend with either a limb or a viabahn. Next, we deploy a second main body inside

of the gate, thus creating now another two limbs to work through. And then through that, extend in its own branch a limb to the SMA. This was an eight by 79 vbx. Then we've got a third limb to go through.

We put a cuff that measures about 14. This is the math so that the double renal snorkle plus the main body fills up this hole. Now, double sheath access from above, looking for both renals. Sheaths out into both renals with viabahns

inside of that. Deployment of the bottom device and then a final angiogram with a little bit of a gutter that we often see when we have any kind of parallel graft configuration. Here's the post-op CT scan wherein

that limb is the two shared renals with the leg. This is the one year post-op with no endo leaks, successful exclusion of this. Here's another example of one of an eight and a half centimeter stent three thorico similar strategy, already with an occluded

celiac. Makes it a little bit easier. One limb goes down to the superior mesenteric artery and then the other limb then is shared again bilateral renals in the lower main body. Notice in this configuration you can get all the way up to the top then by putting a thoracic component

inside of the bifurcated subabdominal component. There's the final CT scan for that. We've spent some time looking at the different combinations of how these things will fill up to minimize the gutters through some more work. In collaboration with some friends in Kampala.

So we've treated 21 patients over the last couple of years. 73 years of age, 48 percent female usual comorbid factors. Oh, I thought I had more data there to show you. O.K. I thought this was a four minute talk.

Look at that. I'm on time. Octopus endovascular strategy is a feasible off the shelf solution for high risk patients that can't undergo open repair. You know obviously, sort of in this forum and coming to this meeting we see what's

available outside of the U.S. and I certainly am awaiting clinical trial devices that will have purpose specific teacher bi-graphs. The end hospital morbidity has still been high, at four percent. The one year survival of 71 percent in this select

group of 21 patients is acceptable. Paraplegia is still an issue even when we stage them and in this strategy you can stage them by just doing the top part plus the viscerals first and leaving the renals for another day. And branch patency thus far has been

in the short term similar to the purpose specific graft as well as with the parallel graft data. Thank you.

- Thank you very much for the presentation. Here are my disclosures. So, unlike the predecessor, Zenith Alpha has nitinol stents and a modular design, which means that the proximal component has this rather gentle-looking bear stents and downward-looking barbs.

And the distal part has upward-looking barbs. And it is a lower-profile device. We reported our first 42 patients in 2014. And now for this meeting we updated our experience to 167 patients operated in the last five years.

So this includes 89 patients with thoracic aneurysms. 24 patients in was the first step of complex operations for thoracoabdominals. We have 24 cases in the arch, 19 dissections, and 11 cases were redos. And this stent graft can be used as a single stent graft,

in this case most of the instances the proximal component is used or it can be used with both components as you can see. So, during the years we moved from surgical access to percutaneous access and now most of the cases are being done percutaneously

and if this is not the case, it's probably because we need some additional surgical procedures, such as an endarterectomy or in cases of aorto-iliac occlusive disease, which was present in 16% of our patients, we are going to need the angioplasty,

this was performed in 7.7% of cases. And by this means all the stent grafts were managed to be released in the intended position. As far as tortuosity concerned, can be mild, moderate, or severe in 6.6% of cases and also in this severe cases,

with the use of a brachio-femoral wire, we managed to cross the iliac tortuosity in all the cases. Quite a challenging situation was when we have an aortic tortuosity, which is also associated with a previous TEVAR. And also in this instances,

with the help of a brachio-femoral wire, all stent grafts were deployed in intended position. We have also deployed this device both in chronic and acute subacute cases. So this can be the topic for some discussion later on. And in the environment of a hybrid treatment,

with surgical branching of the supoaortic tranch, which is offered to selected patients, we have used this device in the arch in a number of cases, with good results. So as far as the overall 30-day results concerned, we had 97.7% of technical success,

with 1.2% of mortality, and endoleaks was low. And so were reinterventions, stroke rate was 1.2%, and the spinal cord injury was 2.4%. By the way we always flash the graft with CO2 before deployment, so this could be helpful. Similar results are found in the literature,

there are three larger series by Illig, Torsello, and Starnes. And they all reported very good technical success and low mortality. So in conclusion, chairmen and colleagues, Zenith Alpha has extended indications

for narrow access vessels, provide safe passage through calcified and tortuous vessels, minimize deployment and release force, high conformability, it does retain the precision and control of previous generation devices,

however we need a longer term follow up to see this advantages are maintained over time. Thank you very much.

- The only disclosure is the device I'm about to talk to you about this morning, is investigation in the United States. What we can say about Arch Branch Technology is it is not novel or particularly new. Hundreds of these procedures have been performed worldwide, most of the experiences have been dominated by a cook device

and the Terumo-Aortic formerly known as Bolton Medical devices. There is mattering of other experience through Medtronic and Gore devices. As of July of 2018 over 340 device implants have been performed,

and this series has been dominated by the dual branch device but actually three branch constructions have been performed in 25 cases. For the Terumo-Aortic Arch Branch device the experience is slightly less but still significant over 160 device implants have been performed as of November of this year.

A small number of single branch and large majority of 150 cases of the double branch repairs and only two cases of the three branch repairs both of them, I will discuss today and I performed. The Aortic 3-branch Arch Devices is based on the relay MBS platform with two antegrade branches and

a third retrograde branch which is not illustrated here, pointing downwards towards descending thoracic Aorta. The first case is a 59 year old intensivist who presented to me in 2009 with uncomplicated type B aortic dissection. This was being medically managed until 2014 when he sustained a second dissection at this time.

An acute ruptured type A dissection and sustaining emergent repair with an ascending graft. Serial imaging shortly thereafter demonstrated a very rapid growth of the Distal arch to 5.7 cm. This is side by side comparison of the pre type A dissection and the post type A repair dissection.

What you can see is the enlargement of the distal arch and especially the complex septal anatomy that has transformed as initial type B dissection after the type A repair. So, under FDA Compassion Use provision, as well as other other regulatory conditions

that had to be met. A Terumo or formerly Bolton, Aortic 3-branch Arch Branch device was constructed and in December 2014 this was performed. As you can see in this illustration, the two antegrade branches and a third branch

pointing this way for the for the left subclavian artery. And this is the images, the pre-deployment, post-deployment, and the three branches being inserted. At the one month follow up you can see the three arch branches widely patent and complete thrombosis of the

proximal dissection. Approximately a year later he presented with some symptoms of mild claudication and significant left and right arm gradient. What we noted on the CT Angiogram was there was a kink in the participially

supported segment of the mid portion of this 3-branch graft. There was also progressive enlargement of the distal thoracoabdominal segment. Our plan was to perform the, to repair the proximal segment with a custom made cuff as well as repair the thoracoabdominal segment

with this cook CMD thoracoabdominal device. As a 4 year follow up he's working full time. He's arm pressures are symmetric. Serum creatinine is normal. Complete false lumen thrombosis. All arch branches patent.

The second case I'll go over really quickly. 68 year old man, again with acute type A dissection. 6.1 cm aortic arch. Initial plan was a left carotid-subclavian bypass with a TEVAR using a chimney technique. We changed that plan to employ a 3-branch branch repair.

Can you advance this? And you can see this photo. In this particular case because the pre-operative left carotid-subclavian bypass and the extension of the dissection in to the innominate artery we elected to...

utilize the two antegrade branches for the bi-lateral carotid branches and actually utilize the downgoing branch through the- for the right subclavian artery for later access to the thoracoabdominal aorta. On post op day one once again he presented with

an affective co arctation secondary to a kink within the previous surgical graft, sustaining a secondary intervention and a placement of a balloon expandable stent. Current status. On Unfortunately the result is not as fortunate

as the first case. In 15 months he presented with recurrent fevers, multi-focal CVAs from septic emboli. Essentially bacteria endocarditis and he was deemed inoperable and he died. So in conclusion.

Repair of complex arch pathologies is feasible with the 3-branch Relay arch branch device. Experience obviously is very limited. Proper patient selection important. And the third antegrade branch is useful for later thoracoabdominal access.

Thank you.

- Thank you Rod and Frank, and thanks Doctor Veeth for the opportunity to share with you our results. I have no disclosures. As we all know, and we've learned in this session, the stakes are high with TEVAR. If you don't have the appropriate device, you can certainly end up in a catastrophe

with a graph collapse. The formerly Bolton, now Terumo, the RelayPlus system is very unique in that it has a dual sheath, for good ability to navigate through the aortic arch. The outer sheath provides for stability,

however, the inner sheath allows for an atraumatic advancement across the arch. There's multiple performance zones that enhance this graph, but really the "S" shape longitudinal spine is very good in that it allows for longitudinal support.

However, it's not super stiff, and it's very flexible. This device has been well studied throughout the world as you can see here, through the various studies in the US, Europe, and global. It's been rigorously studied,

and the results are excellent. The RelayPlus Type I endoleak rate, as you can see here, is zero. And, in one of the studies, as you can see here, relative to the other devices, not only is it efficacious, but it's safe as well,

as you can see here, as a low stroke rate with this device. And that's probably due to the flexible inner sheath. Here again is a highlight in the Relay Phase II trial, showing that, at 27 sites it was very effective, with zero endoleak, minimal stent migration, and zero reported graph collapses.

Here again you can see this, relative to the other devices, it's a very efficacious device, with no aneurism ruptures, no endoleaks, no migration, and no fractures. What I want to take the next couple minutes to highlight, is not only how well this graph works,

but how well it works in tight angles, greater than 90 degrees. Here you can see, compliments and courtesy of Neal Cayne, from NYU, this patient had a prior debranching, with a ascending bypass, as you can see here.

And with this extreme angulation, you can see that proximally the graph performs quite well. Here's another case from Venke at Arizona Heart, showing how well with this inner sheath, this device can cross through, not only a tortuous aorta, but prior graphs as well.

As you can see, screen right, you can see the final angiogram with a successful result. Again, another case from our colleagues in University of Florida, highlighting how this graph can perform proximally with severe angulation

greater than 90 degrees. And finally, one other case here, highlighting somebody who had a prior repair. As you can see there's a pseudoaneurysm, again, a tight proximal, really mid aortic angle, and the graph worked quite well as you can see here.

What I also want to kind of remind everybody, is what about the distal aorta? Sometimes referred to as the thoracic aorta, or the ox bow, as you can see here from the ox bow pin. Oftentimes, distally, the aorta is extremely tortuous like this.

Here's one of our patients, Diana, that we treated about a year and a half ago. As you can see here, not only you're going to see the graph performs quite well proximally, but also distally, as well. Here Diana had a hell of an angle, over 112 degrees,

which one would think could lead to a graph collapse. Again, highlighting this ox bow kind of feature, we went ahead and placed our RelayPlus graph, and you can see here, it not only performs awesome proximally, but distally as well. And again, that's related to that

"S" shaped spine that this device has. So again, A, it's got excellent proximal and distal seal, but not only that, patency as well, and as I mentioned, she's over a year and a half out. And quite an excellent result with this graph. So in summary, the Terumo Aortic Relay stent graph is safe,

effective, it doesn't collapse, and it performs well, especially in proximal and distal severe angulations. Thank you so much.

- Thank you, Mr. Chairman. Ladies and gentleman. I'd also like to thank Dr. Veith for the kind invitation. This presentation really ties to the presentation of Erik Verhoven, I believe. These are my disclosures. So we basically have, obviously, two problems. We treat a dynamic disease by fairly static means.

One of the problems, a local problem, is aortic neck degeneration which is the problem basically of progression of disease. We know in general if you stent them, if you operate them, if you don't treat them they will just dilate and it's a question of time

whether you have a problem or not. So, they will inevitably, if patients live long enough, cause a change of geometry of the aorta and the branch vessels and that cause obviously, that can cause stent fractures and other problems.

That's just one of many papers Erik also has shown a migrated graft. With his fenestrated grafts showing that the problem is also prevalent in M stents and Z stents, and obviously also in

as in the Fenestrated Anaconda. So I'll talk briefly about our experience. In Vienna where we have treated so far 179 patients with either double, triple, or quadruple fenestrated grafts. Majority nowadays are quadruple in our series

where we have also treated patients with extensions of thoracic stent grafts or extensions further down to the iliac arteries. In these patients we've had relevant neck degenerations in five cases. Where either the branches had issues

or the graft had migrated relevantly. And these basically represent three different faces of the problem. So one is neck degeneration with migration and loss of seal. Certainly the biggest problem that can cause ruptures. That's one of the cases in 2015

what is certainly important is to have a look at the super celiac area of the aorta and you see it's degenerated, it's dilated. So we have a nice ring of aorta at the visceral segment but above it wasn't. And it was a

you see the saddle of the stent graft and one and a half years later the saddle (cough) has flattened out. We've had a stent fracture of the left renal stent.

We screwed it with anchors and fixed the stent graft. We believe that's going to be the solution. We were wrong. Yet anothe leak and a further migration of the case.

So we had to put in a thoracic endograft and bring in a 4 fen and a mono-iliac crossover solution. The other problem would be neck degeneration or progression of disease without migration or loss of seal. As in this case where we have implanted a 4 fen case and you can see here that there is

a diseased proportion of the thoracic aorta. Could look like a penetrating ulcer. And again we had to put in a thoracic stent graft and a 4 fen solution with a mono-iliac ending and a crossover. What's more important, I believe,

is the progression of general, generalized aortic disease. So there is no real migration, as in this case in 2013. You can see a nice saddle and very straight iliac limbs. 2018 you can see that the saddle is actually flattened out. Renal arteries look upwards, so you would actually believe in

a migration of the stent graft. Also if you look at the iliac limbs you can see that they have actually compressed somewhat. But if you look closely at the difference between the ring and the SMA, so that's lateral view, you can see that there is no difference.

The stent graft actually has not migrated. What happened is that the patient developed a thoracic aneurysm of 7.5cm and the whole aorta is not only increased in diameter but also in length. So the whole thing has moved its confirmation without basically a migration of the

not yet. So, Mr Chairman, Ladies a lessons we have learned is- and I could also repeat wh

seal in the healthiest proportion of the aorta. So if you see a nice visceral ring and above that you see a diseased proportion of the aorta, as in this case, where you have already a degenerated thoracic aorta.

You should really treat this as well and not go for a 2 or 3 fen case. And also the progressio the general progression of disease is an issue. So even if you have no migrations

you may end up with real problems and target vessel occlusions or stent graft fractures. Thank you very much

- Thank you for the opportunity to present this arch device. This is a two module arch device. The main model comes from the innominated to the descending thoracic aorta and has a large fenestration for the ascending model that is fixed with hooks and three centimeters overlapping with the main one.

The beginning fenestration for the left carotid artery was projected but was abandoned for technical issue. The delivery system is precurved, preshaped and this allows an easy positioning of the graft that runs on a through-and-through wire from the

brachial to the femoral axis and you see here how the graft, the main model is deployed with the blood that supported the supraortic vessels. The ascending model is deployed after under rapid pacing.

And this is the compilation angiogram. This is a case from our experience is 6.6 centimeters arch and descending aneurysm. This is the planning we had with the Gore Tag. at the bottom of the implantation and these are the measures.

The plan was a two-stage procedure. First the hemiarch the branching, and then the endovascular procedure. Here the main measure for the graph, the BCT origin, 21 millimeters, the BCT bifurcation, 20 millimeters,

length, 30 millimeters, and the distal landing zone was 35 millimeters. And these are the measures that we choose, because this is supposed to be an off-the-shelf device. Then the measure for the ascending, distal ascending, 35 millimeters,

proximal ascending, 36, length of the outer curve of 9 centimeters, on the inner curve of 5 centimeters, and the ascending model is precurved and we choose a length between the two I cited before. This is the implantation of the graft you see,

the graft in the BCT. Here, the angiography to visualize the bifurcation of the BCT, and the release of the first part of the graft in the BCT. Then the angiography to check the position. And the release of the graft by pushing the graft

to well open the fenestration for the ascending and the ascending model that is released under cardiac pacing. After the orientation of the beat marker. And finally, a kissing angioplasty and this is the completion and geography.

Generally we perform a percutaneous access at auxiliary level and we close it with a progolide checking the closure with sheet that comes from the groin to verify the good occlusion of the auxiliary artery. And this is the completion, the CT post-operative.

Okay. Seven arch aneurysm patients. These are the co-morbidities. We had only one minor stroke in the only patient we treated with the fenestration for the left carotid and symptomology regressed completely.

In the global study, we had 46 implantations, 37 single branch device in the BCT, 18 in the first in men, 19 compassionate. These are the co-morbidities and indications for treatment. All the procedures were successful.

All the patients survived the procedure. 10 patients had a periscope performed to perfuse the left auxiliary artery after a carotid to subclavian bypass instead of a hemiarch, the branching. The mean follow up for 25 patients is now 12 months.

Good technical success and patency. We had two cases of aneurysmal growth and nine re-interventions, mainly for type II and the leak for the LSA and from gutters. The capilomiar shows a survival of 88% at three years.

There were three non-disabling stroke and one major stroke during follow up, and three patients died for unrelated reasons. The re-intervention were mainly due to endo leak, so the first experience was quite good in our experience and thanks a lot.

- Thanks (mumbles) I have no disclosures. So when were talking about treating thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms in patients with chronic aortic dissections, these are some of the most difficult patients to treat. I thought it would be interesting

to just show you a case that we did. This is a patient, you can see the CT scrolling through, Type B dissection starts pretty much at the left subclavian, aneurysmal. It's extensive dissection that involves the thoracic aorta, abdominal aorta,

basically goes down to the iliac arteries. You can see the celiac, SMA, renals at least partially coming off the true and continues all the way down. It's just an M2S reconstruction. You can see again the extent of this disease and what makes this so difficult in that it extends

from the entire aorta, up proximally and distally. So what we do for this patient, we did a left carotid subclavian bypass, a left external to internal iliac artery bypass. We use a bunch of thoracic stent grafts and extended that distally.

You can see we tapered down more distally. We used an EVAR device to come from below. And then a bunch of parallel grafts to perfuse our renals and SMA. I think a couple take-home messages from this is that clearly you want to preserve the branches

up in the arch. The internal iliac arteries are, I think, very critical for perfusing the spinal cord, especially when you are going to cover this much. And when you are dealing with these dissections, you have to realize that the true lumens

can become quite small and sometimes you have to accommodate for that by using smaller thoracic endografts. So this is just what it looks like in completion. You can see how much metal we have in here. It's a full metal jacket of the aorta, oops.

We, uh, it's not advancing. Oops, is it 'cause I'm pressing in it or? All right, here we go. And then two years post-op, two years post-op, you can see what this looks like. The false lumen is completely thrombosed and excluded.

You can see the parallel grafts are all open. The aneurysm sac is regressing and this patient was successfully treated. So what are some of the tips and tricks of doing these types of procedures. Well we like to come in from the axillary artery.

We don't perform any conduits. We just stick the axillary artery separately in an offset manner and place purse-string sutures. You have to be weary of manipulating around the aortic arch, especially if its a more difficult arch, as well as any thoracic aortic tortuosity.

Cannulating of vessels, SMA is usually pretty easy, as you heard earlier. The renals and celiac can be more difficult, depending upon the angles, how they come off, and the projection. You want to make sure you maintain a stiff wire,

when you do get into these vessels. Using a Coda balloon can be helpful, as sometimes when you're coming from above, the wires and catheters will want to reflux into that infrarenal aorta. And the Coda balloon can help bounce that up.

What we do in situations where the Coda doesn't work is we will come in from below and a place a small balloon in the distal renal artery to pin the catheters, wires and then be able to get the stents in subsequently. In terms of the celiac artery,

if you're going to stent it, you want to make sure, your wire is in the common hepatic artery, so you don't exclude that by accident. I find that it is just simpler to cover, if the collaterals are intact. If there is a patent GDA on CT scan,

we will almost always cover it. You can see here that robust collateral pathway through the GDA. One thing to be aware of is that you are going to, if you're not going to revascularize the celiac artery you may need to embolize it.

If its, if the endograft is not going to oppose the origin of the celiac artery in the aorta because its aneurysmal in that segment. In terms of the snorkel extent, you want to make sure, you get enough distal purchase. This is a patient intra-procedurally.

We didn't get far enough and it pulled out and you can see we're perfusing the sac. It's critical that the snorkel or parallel grafts extend above the most proximal extent of your aortic endograft or going to go down. And so we take a lot of care looking at high resolution

pictures to make sure that our snorkel and parallel grafts are above the aortic endograft. This is just a patient just about a year or two out. You can see that the SMA stent is pulling out into the sac. She developed a endoleak from the SMA,

so we had to come in and re-extend it more distally. Just some other things I mentioned a little earlier, you want to consider true lumen space preserve the internals, and then need to sandwich technique to shorten the parallel grafts. Looking at a little bit of literature,

you can see this is the PERCLES Registry. There is a number of type four thoracos that are performed here with good results. This is a paper looking at parallel grafting and 31 thoracoabdominal repairs. And you can see freedom from endoleaks,

chimney graft patency, as well as survival is excellent. This was one looking purely at thoracoabdominal aneurysm repairs. There are 32 altogether and the success rates and results were good as well. And this was one looking at ruptures,

where they found that there was a mean 20% sac shrinkage rate and all endografts remained patent. So conclusion I think that these are quite difficult to do, but with good techniques, they can be done successfully. Thank you.

- Now I want to talk about, as Chrissy mentioned AVM Classification System and it's treatment implication to achieve cure. How do I put forward? Okay, no disclosures. So there are already AVM Classification Systems. One is the well-known Houdart classification

for CNS lesions, and the other one is quite similar to the description to the Houdart lesion, the Cho Do classification of peripheral AVM's. But what do we expect from a good classification system? We expect that it gives us also a guide how to treat with a high rate of cure,

also for complex lesions. So the Yakes Classification System was introduced in 2014, and it's basically a further refinement of the previous classification systems, but it adds other features. As for example, a new description of

a new entity, Type IV AVM's with a new angioarchitecture, it defines the nidus, and especially a value is that it shows you the treatment strategy that should be applied according to angioarchitecture to treat the lesion. It's based on the use of ethanol and coils,

and it's also based on the long experience of his describer, Wayne Yakes. So the Yakes Classification System is also applicable to the very complex lesions, and we start with the Type I AVM, which is the most simple, direct

arterial to venous connection without nidus. So Type I is the simplest lesion and it's very common in the lung or in the kidney. Here we have a Type I AVM come from the aortic bifurcation draining into the paralumbar venous plexus,

and to get access, selective cauterization of the AVM is needed to define the transition point from the arterial side to the venous side, and to treat. So what is the approach to treat this? It's basically a mechanical approach, occluding

the lesion and the transition point, using mechanical devices, which can be coils or also other devices. For example, plugs or balloons. In small lesions, it can also be occluded using ethanol, but to mainly in larger lesions,

mechanical devices are needed for cure. Type II is the common and typical AVM which describes nidus, which comes from

multiple in-flow arteries and is drained by multiple veins. So this structure, as you can see here, can be, very, very dense, with multiple tangled fistulaes. And the way to break this AVM down is mainly that you get more selective views, so you want to get selective views

on the separate compartments to treat. So what are the treatment options? As you can see here, this is a very selective view of one compartment, and this can be treated using ethanol, which can be applied

by a superselective transcatheter arterial approach, where you try to get as far as possible to the nidus. Or if tangled vessels are not allowing transcatheter access, direct puncture of the feeding arteries immediately proximal to the nidus can be done to apply ethanol. What is the difference between Type IIa and IIb?

IIb has the same in-flow pattern as Type a, but it has a different out-flow pattern, with a large vein aneurysm. It's crucial to distinguish that the nidus precedes this venous aneurysm. So here you can see a nice example for Type IIb AVM.

This is a preview of the pelvis, we can here now see, in a lateral view, that the nidus fills the vein aneurysm and precedes this venous aneurysm. So how can this lesion be accessed? Of course, direct puncture is a safe way

to detect the lesion from the venous side. So blocking the outflow with coils, and possibly also ethanol after the flow is reduced to reflux into the fistulaes. It's a safe approach from the venous side for these large vein aneurysm lesions,

but also superselective transcatheter arterial approach to the nidus is able to achieve cure by placing ethanol into the nidus, but has to be directly in front of the nidus to spare nutrient arteries.

Type IIIa has also multiple in-flow arteries, but the nidus is inside the vein aneurysm wall. So the nidus doesn't precede the lesion, but it's in the vein wall. So where should this AVM be treated?

And you can see a very nice example here. This is a Type IIIa with a single out-flow vein, of the aneurysm vein, and this is a direct puncture of the vein, and you can see quite well that this vein aneurysm has just one single out-flow. So by blocking this out-flow vein,

the nidus is blocked too. Also ethanol can be applied after the flow was reduced again to reflux into the fistulas inside the vein aneurysm wall. And here you can see that by packing a dense packing with coils, the lesion is cured.

So direct puncture again from the venous side in this venous aneurysm venous predominant lesion. Type IIIb, the difference here is again, the out-flow pattern. So we have multiple in-flow arteries, the fistulaes are again in the vein aneurysm.

Which makes it even more difficult to treat this lesion, is that it has multiple out-flow veins and the nidus can also precede into these or move into these out-flow veins. So the dense packing of the aneurysm might have to be extended into the out-flow veins.

So what you can see here is an example. Again you need a more selective view, but you can already see the vein aneurysm, which can be targeted by direct puncture. And again here, the system applies. Placing coils and dense packing of the vein aneurysm,

and possibly also of the out-flow veins, can cure the lesion. This is the angiogram showing cure of this complex AVM IIIb. Type IV is a very new entity which was not described

in any other classification system as of yet. So what is so special about this Type IV AVM is it has multiple arteries and arterioles that form innumerable AV fistulaes, but these fistulaes infiltrate the tissue. And I'm going to specify this entity in a separate talk,

so I'm not going too much into details here. But treatment strategy of course, is also direct puncture here, and in case possible to achieve transarterial access very close to the nidus transarterial approach is also possible. But there are specific considerations, for example

50/50 mixture of alcohol, I'm going to specify this in a later talk. And here you can see some examples of this micro-fistulae in Type IV AVM infiltrative type. This is a new entity described. So the conclusion is that the Yakes Classification System

is based on the angioarchitecture of AVM's and on hemodynamic features. So it offers you a clear definition here the nidus is located, and where to deliver alcohol in a safe way to cure even complex AVM's.

Thank you very much.

- Mister Chairman, ladies and gentlemen. Good morning. I am excited to present some of the data on the new device here. These are my disclosure. There are opportunities to improve current TEVAR devices. One of that is to have a smaller device,

is a rapid deployment that is precise, and wider possibilities to have multiple size matrix to adapt to single patient anatomy. The Valiant device actually tried to meet all these unmet needs, and nowadays the Navion has been designed on the platform

of the Valiant Captivia device with a completely different solution. First of all, it's four French smaller than the Valiant Captivia, and now it's 18 French in outer diameter for the smallest sizes available.

The device has been redesigned with a shorter tip and longer length of the shaft to approach more proximal diseases, and the delivery system deploys the graft in one step that is very easy to accomplish and precise.

The fabric has been changed with nowadays the Navion having the multi-filament weave of the Endurant that already demonstrates conformability, flexibility, and long-term durability of the material. It's coming with a wide matrix of options available. In terms of length, up to 225 mm.

Diameters as small as 20 mm, and tapered device to treat particular anatomical needs. But probably the most important innovation is the possibility to have two proximal configuration options: the FreeFlo and the CoveredSeal.

Both tied to the tip of the device with the tip-capture mechanism that ensures proximal deployment of the graft that is very accurate. This graft is being under trial in a global trial

that included 100 patients all over the world. The first 87 patients have been submitted for primary endpoint analysis. 40% of the patients were females. High risk patients showed here by the ASA class III and IV. Most of the patients presented

with a fusiform or saccular aneurysm, and the baseline anatomy is quite typical for these kinds of patients, but most of the patients have the very tortuous indices, both at the level of the access artery tortuosity and the thoracic aorta tortuosity.

Three-fourths of the patients had been treated with a FreeFlo proximal end of the graft, while one-fourth with the CoveredSeal. Complete coverage of the left subclavian occurred in one-fifth of the patients. Almost all had been revascularized.

Procedure was quite short, less than one and half hour, percutaneous access in the majority of cases. There were no access or deployment failures in this series. And coming to the key clinical endpoints, there were two mortality reported out of 87 patients.

One was due to the retrograde type A dissection at day one, and one was not device related almost at the end of the first month. Secondary procedures were again two. One was in the case of retrograde type A dissection, and the second one in a patient

that had an arch rupture due to septicemia. Type 1a endoleak was reported in only one case, and it was felt to be no adverse event associated so was kept under surveillance without any intervention. Major Adverse Events occurred in 28% of the cases. Notably four patients had a stroke

that was mild and not disabling, regressing in two weeks. Only one case of spinal cord ischaemia that resolved by drainage and therapy in 20 days. In summary, we can say that the design enhancement of Valiant Navion improved upon current generation TEVAR.

Acute performance is quite encouraging: no access or deployment failure, low procedural and fluoro times, low rate of endoleaks, Major Adverse Events in the range expected for this procedure.

Nowadays the graft is USA FDA approved as well as in Europe CE mark. And of course we have to wait the five years results.

you know the most common procedures in China this is kind of interesting I was blown away by this when I did the research on this I knew when I would go

into the hospitals and I was all over for I've been to Beijing shanghai nanjing to even the smallest little place is up in northern china and the one thing that blew me away I'm looking at the board and I'm seeing neuro case

after neuro case after neuro case I'm like it got 10 Narrows and and a pic line I'm like it's an interesting interesting Dysport of cases and the reason being is in China they consider diagnostic neuro

so neuro angio to be the primary evaluating factor for any type of neurological issue so you're not getting a CT if you come in with a headache you think you're gonna go get that cat scan now it's generally what not what they do

so you're talking about a case and I'll give you the case matrix of the break-up it's just proportionately high for a neuro very well trained in neuro and most of the guys that are trying to neuro very similar to what dr. well Saad

said a lot of the guys in Africa are trained in France so other neuro interventions have trained in France or lipstick in China and have received European training on that so you know the level of what they're doing some of

the stroke interventions some of the ways they're going after these complex APM's they'll Rob well anything you'll see here in the US so it is quite interesting to see and the second

largest is taste hepatocellular carcinoma is on the rise it's the highest level in the world is found in China and Korea for that matter and there's many reasons why we can go into it some of it is genetic factors and a

lot of societal factors alcohol is a very liberally lie baited in China and there is problems with you know cirrhotic disease and other things that we know could be particular factors for HCC so always found that very

interesting like I said I would go into a hospital and I'll see a PICC line a hemodialysis catheter and then 20 tase's on the board in one day so it is quite interesting how they do it and then biliary intervention stents tips and

then lung ablation you know the highest rates of HCC biliary cancer and lung cancer found in China and once again when we talk about lung cancer what are those contributing factors you're talking about certainly a genetic

component but mostly it's lifestyle factors smoking is prevalent in the US and in you know in Europe and in some areas in Asia we've seen obviously a big reduction in smoking which is fantastic China not so much you don't see that

it's a societal thing for them and unfortunately that has led to the the largest rates of cancer in the world in lung cancer so lung ablation is a big procedure for them over there as well so procedure breakdown this is kind of some

of that breakdown I was telling you about that cerebral procedure is some of the most commonly performed and you're talking about at very large numbers they're doing neuro intervention because they do it for die

Gnostic purposes and I would that kind of blew me away when I found out they do have cast scanners and certainly for trauma and things like that they'll do it but the majority of the stuff if you come in you have headaches you might end

up in the neuro suite so it's quite interesting how they can do that tumor intervention very high like I said you have the highest rates of HCC in the world you're getting cases they do have y9t available and in fact China just

made their largest acquisition ever with the by what you guys know a company they bought surtex there's a Chinese company now it got bought by China now the interesting is they don't currently have a whole lot of

y9t over there but they just opened up some of their own generators so they can actually start producing the white room 90 and I think you'll see probably a increase in those numbers of y9t cases but to date the number one procedure for

them is taste and they do a lot of them you know like I said on average a community hospital setting you might find 15 or 20 cases a day with three interventionalists so compared to what you guys do there's probably not many

people here unless you're working at a major institution that there's nothing but cancer doing 20 cases a day and I promise you're probably not doing it with only two interventionalists so it's amazing how fast and effective they've

gotten at and below therapy and unfortunately it is necessary because of those elevated HCC levels and like I said when we look at some of these things it's I go over there and I'm looking at the board there are very few

cases for you know PICC lines very few the frosted grams very new bread-and-butter abscess training procedures like we do here in the US they are very it's the prevalence is very simple it's neuro it stays and it's

biopsy and those are some kind of the big three for intervention in China and there it's such a large volume you get to learn a lot when you're over there and CLI PA D even though it's more prevalent in China than it is here

because smoking lifestyle factors certainly westernization of the diet in China which occurred since the 1950s and 60s has led to a lot of McDonald's and and fast food and things that weren't currently available prior to 1950s you

see a lot of PA d but it is very undertreated and certainly talking to some of my colleagues like whom are oh you'll get to see a little bit later on with CLI fighters one of the things that's kind of frustrating for them is

that it is so undertreated it's very common to see amputations in China instead of actually doing pipe in percutaneous intervention they normally like to go too far and you see a lot of amputation certainly above

normal so that's something I think as an interventional initiative when we look at these things coming from a Western perspective it's definitely something we need to pursue a little more aggressively but there it's very little

oh well you're talking about two you know two to three percent you know maybe up to six percent or PID cases very very low levels so equipment in equipment in

- Rifampin-soaked endografts for treating prosthetic graf y work? I have no conflicts of interest. Open surgery for mycotic aneurysms is not perfect. We know it's logical, but it has a morbidity mortality of at least 40% in the abdomen and higher in the chest.

Sick, old, infected patients do poorly with major open operations so endografts sound logical. However, the theoretical reasons not to use them is putting a prosthetic endograft in an infected aorta immediately gets infected. Not removing infected tissue creates

an abcess in the aorta outside the endgraft and of course you have to replace the aorta in aorto-enteric fistulas. So, case in point, saccular aneurysm treated with a TEVAR and two weeks later as fever and abdominal pain.

You start out like this, you put an EVAR inside you get an abcess. Ended up with an open ilio-celiac open thoraco with left heart bypass. Had to sew two arches together. But what about cases where you can't

or you shouldn't do open? For example, 44 year old IV drug user, recurrent staph aureus endocarditis, bacteremia, had a previous aorto-bifem which was occluded, iliac stents, many many laparotomies ending in short bowel syndrome and an ileostomy.

CT scan and a positive tag white cell scan shows this. It's two centimeters, it's okay, treat it with antibiotics. Unfortunately, 10 days later it looks like this, so open repair. So, we tried for hours to get into the abdomen. The abdomen was frozen and, ultimately,

we ended up going to endografts so I added rifampin to it, did an aorta union and a fem fem and it looked like this and I said well, we'll see what happens. She's going to die. Amazingly, at a year the sac had totally shrunk. I remind you she was on continuous treatment.

She had her heart replaced again for the second time and notice the difference between the stent at one year to the sac size. So adding rifampin to prosthetic Dacron was first described in the late 1980's and inhibits growth in vivo and in vitro.

So I used the same concentration of 60 milligrams per milliliter. That's three amps of 600, 30 CC's water injected into the sheath. We published this awhile back. You can go straight into the sheath in a Cook.

Looks like this, or you can pre deploy a bit of little Medtronic and sort of trickle it in with an angiocatheter. So the idea that endografts in infected aortas immediately become infected, make it worse. I don't think it's true.

It may be false. What about aorto-enteric fistulas? This person showed up 63 year old hemorrhagic shock, previous Dacron patch, angioplasty to the aorta a few years ago, aorto-duodenal fistula not subtle. Nice little Hiroshima sign

and occluded bilateral external iliac arteries. Her abdomen looked like this. Multiple abdominal hernias, bowel resections, and had a skin graft on the bowel. Clearly this was the option. I'm not going to tell you how I magically got in there

but let's just leave it at that I got an endograft in there, rifampin soaked, sealed the hole and then I put her on TPN. So the idea that you have to resect and bypass, I'll get back to her soon, I think it's false. You don't necessarily have to do it every time. What about aorto-esophageal hemorrhagic shock, hematemesis?

Notice the laryng and esophageus of the contrast, real deal fistula. Put some TEVARs in there, and the idea was to temporize and to do a definitive repair knowing that we wouldn't get away with it. On post update nine, we did a cervical esophagostomy

and diverted the esophagus with the idea that maybe he could heal for a little while. He went home, we were going to repair him later, but of course he came back with fever, malaise, and of course gas around the aneurysm and we ended up having to fix him open.

So the problem with aorto-enteric fistulas is when you put an endograft in them it's sort of like a little boomerang. You get to throw them out and it's nice and it sails around but in the end you have to catch it. So, in the long term the lady I showed you before,

a year and a half later she came back with a retroperitoneal abscess. However, she was in much better shape. She wasn't bleeding to death, she'd lost weight, she'd quit smoking. She got an ax-bi-fem, open resection,

gastrojejunostomy and she's at home. So, I think the idea's, I think it's false but maybe realistically what it is, is that eventually if you do aorto-enteric fistulas you're going to have to do something and maybe if you don't remove the infection

it may make it worse. So in conclusion, endografts for mycotic aneurysms, they do save lives. I think you should use them liberally for bad cases. It could be a bad patient, a bad aorta, or bad presentation. Treat it with antibiotics as long as possible

before you put the endograft in and here's the voodoo, 60 milligrams per mil of rifampin. Don't just put in there, put it in with some semblance of science behind it, put it on Dacron, it may even lead to complete resolution. And I've also added trans-lumbar thoracic pigtail drains

in patients that I literally cannot ever want to go back in. Put 'em in for ten days wash it out. TPN on aorto-enterics for a month, voodoo, I agree, and I use antibiotics for life. Have a good plan B because it may come back in two weeks or two years, deploy them low

or cut out the super renal fixations so you can take them out a little easier. Thank you.

- Thank you (mumbles). The purpose of deep venous valve repair is to correct the reflux. And we have different type of reflux. We know we have primary, secondary, the much more frequent and the rear valve agenesia. In primary deep venous incompetence,

valves are usually present but they are malfunctioning and the internal valvuloplasty is undoubtedly the best option. If we have a valve we can repair it and the results are undoubtedly the better of all deep vein surgery reconstruction

but when we are in the congenital absence of valve which is probably the worst situation or we are in post-thrombotic syndrome where cusps are fully destroyed, the situation is totally different. In this situation, we need alternative technique

to provide a reflux correction that may be transposition, new valve or valve transplants. The mono cuspid valve is an option between those and we can obtain it by parietal dissection. We use the fibrotic tissue determined by the

sickening of the PTS event obtaining a kind of flap that we call valve but as you can realize is absolutely something different from a native valve. The morphology may change depending on the wall feature and the wall thickness

but we have to manage the failure of the mono cuspid valve which is mainly due to the readhesion of the flap which is caused by the fact that if we have only a mono cuspid valve, we need a deeper pocket to reach the contralateral wall so bicuspid valve we have

smaller cusps in mono cuspid we have a larger one. And how can we prevent readhesion? In our first moment we can apply a technical element which is to stabilize the valve in the semi-open position in order not to have the collapse of the valve with itself and then we had decide to apply an hemodynamic element.

Whenever possible, the valve is created in front of a vein confluence. In this way we can obtain a kind of competing flow, a better washout and a more mobile flap. This is undoubtedly a situation that is not present in nature but helps in providing non-collapse

and non-thrombotic events in the cusp itself. In fact, if we look at the mathematical modeling in the flow on valve you can see how it does work in a bicuspid but when we are in a mono cuspid, you see that in the bottom of the flap

we have no flow and here there is the risk of thrombosis and here there is the risk of collapse. If we go to a competing flow pattern, the flap is washed out alternatively from one side to the other side and this suggest us the idea to go through a mono cuspid

valve which is not just opens forward during but is endovascular and in fact that's what we are working on. Undoubtedly open surgery at the present is the only available solution but we realized that obviously to have the possibility

to have an endovascular approach may be totally different. As you can understand we move out from the concept to mimic nature. We are not able to provide the same anatomy, the same structure of a valve and we have to put

in the field the possibility to have no thrombosis and much more mobile flap. This is the lesson we learn from many years of surgery. The problem is the mobile flap and the thrombosis inside the flap itself. The final result of a valve reconstruction

disregarding the type of method we apply is to obtain an anti-reflux mechanism. It is not a valve, it is just an anti-reflux mechanism but it can be a great opportunity for patient presenting a deep vein reflux that strongly affected their quality of life.

Thank you.

- So thank you to the organizers and to Dr. Veith, and thank you to Dr. Ouriel for giving me the introduction of the expense of an unsuitable procedure for pain patients. We have no disclosures.

I think when you look at MRV or Venous interventions, you can look at it as providing you a primary diagnosis, confirming a diagnosis if there's confusion. Procedural planning, you can use it as a procedural adjunct,

or you can use it as a primary procedural modality. In general, flow-dependent MRI has a low sensitivity and a slow acquisition time, making it practically impractical. Flow-independent MRI has become more popular, with sensitivity and specificities

rounding at 95 to 100%. There's a great deal of data on contrast-enhanced MRI, avoiding adanalenum using the iron compounds, and you'll hear later from Dr. Black about Direct Thrombus Imaging. There has been significant work on Thrombus Imaging,

but I will leave it up to him to talk about it. MR you can diagnose a DVT, either in both modalities, and you can see here with the arrows. It will also provide you data on the least inaccessible areas for duplex and other modalities,

such as the iliac veins and the IVC, as can be seen here. It is also perhaps easier to use than CTV, because at least in my institution CTV always comes out as a CTA, and I can't help that no matter what happens.

MR can also show you collaterals, which may be very important as you are trying to diagnose a patient. And in essence it may show you the smaller vein that you're more interested in, particularly in pelvic congestion syndrome,

such as this patient with an occluded internal iliac vein. It can also demonstrate, for those of you who deal with dialysis access, or it's central line problems, central venous stenosis and Thrombus. But equally importantly

it may show you that a stenosis is not intrinsic to the wall, but it's actually intrinsic to extravascular inflammation, as in this patient with mediastinal fibrosis, and which will give you a different way of what you wish to do and treat.

The European guidelines have addressed MR in it's future with chronic venous disease and they give it a 1C rating, and they recommend that if doesn't work you should proceed to Ibes. It can be used for the diagnoses of pulmonary embolism,

it can eliminate the use of ECHO, one can diagnose both the presence of the Thrombus, the dilatation of the ventricul, and if one is using Dynamic MR Imaging one can also see mcconnell sign or the equivalent on the septum between the two ventricles.

More interestingly it can also be used now in the chronic thrombuc, pulmonary hypertension, where it can show both the legions that are treatable and untreatable, as some of you may have heard from Dr. Roosevelt

earlier in the day, where they're now treating the outlying lesions with balloon angioplasty serial sessions. It can also look at the ventricul and give you some idea of where the ventricul stands with regard to it's performance,

we're looking at and linking this to the lungs. It can also show you the unusual, such as atresia of the IVC or it can help with you the diagnosis of Pelvic Congestion Syndrome. And it is extremely valuable

in dealing with AVM's, although it may take one, two, or three sessions with differing contrast bulosus to identify both the arterial, the intrinsic lesion, and the outflow lesions,

but a very valuable adjunct. In renal carcinoma it has two values, one is that it can may diagnosis venous invasion, and it may also let you understand whether or not you are dealing with bland thrombus or tumor thrombus,

which can change the staging for the patient and also change the actual intervention that you may perform. If you use flash imaging one will get at least an 89% sensitivity of the nature of thrombus,

whether it's bland or tumor thrombus, which may change what you need to do during the procedure. It could also tell you whether there's actual true wall invasion, which will require excision of the IVC

as opposed to the simple thromboendarterectomy. And this can run up to a specificity of 88% to exclude it. In the brain it's commonly used to diagnose the intra tumor vasculature. Diagnosing between veins and arterial systems, which can be helpful

particularly if one is considering percutaneous or other interventions. With regard to central venous stenosis there is some data and most people are now using an onlay technique where they take the MRI,

they develop the lines for the vessels and then use that as guide in one or two dimensions with fusion imaging to achieve access with a wire, catheter and balloon, as opposed to a blind stick technique.

There is data to show that you can image with the correct catheter balloons within the vessels and do serial MR's to show that it works. And finally with guidance catheters EP is now able to guide the catheter further and further in to achieve from the,

either the jugular or the venous access across the septum and to burn the entrium as appropriate. And finally, one can use MR to actually gain access, burn, and then actually use the MR to look at the specific tissue,

to show that you've achieved a burn at the appropriate area within the cardiac system and thus prove that your modality has achieved it. So in summary, we can use it for primary diagnosis, confirmatory diagnosis,

procedural planning, and procedural adjunct, but we're only still learning how to use it as a primary procedural modality. Thank you so much.

- Thank you very much, thank you Cees, that was really interesting, it's um, it's a topic close to my heart and I think that there's a great deal of work about pneumatic compression that we can learn from. These are my disclosures. Your stent choice, well,

we talk an awful lot about stents, but it is really only one part of the entire spectrum of factors that get it right. And when you get it right, you have an open vein and we believe that the open vein works, although the open vein hypothesis

seems somewhat compromised, considering where it came from in terms of open arteries. But your stent choice is just one of the factors that goes into it, and your inflow, and your outflow generally we can improve upon. Your muscle pump we'd like to improve

by using pneumatic compression boots, and then obviously getting your anti-coagulation right, as Dr. Weinberg explained, is really really key afterward. So, stent choice is one of the aspects, but it's certainly not the only aspect. You're familiar, and probably sick of these diagrams

showing the differences between radial force, crush resistance, and the trade-offs between stent flex, strengths, rather, and when I use strength it's a fairly generic term, and flexibility. And obviously in Europe, we have access to a wide variety of stents.

The Cook Zilver Vena first came out in 2010. Bard Venovo was, I think, 2016. The ABRE was just last December, but it's commercially available. The Optimed Sinus-Venous has been around for quite some time, I'm going to say 2011 if I'm correct.

And the Sinus Obliquus, then it was a little bit later, maybe 2014, 2015, and for those of you who haven't seen this before, this has got a, a closed-cell design at the top which is quite rigid, if I may, and then a very flexible sinus,

or rather open-cell design at the inferior portion, the top portion is angled to address the IVC confluence. And then the Veniti Vici, which is, (coughs) excuse me, was extensively studied in the VIRTUS trial, and this is a more closed-cell, but there's still a considerable flexibility.

So, like everything else in life, you know, you can go for the old broad who's got loads of money, or you can go for the young hot chick, and you know, she's broke. And you know, life is like that, and stents are like that too.

You know, what you get in one you lose in the other. And like a lot of the other things, you have to get everything right to make the stent work. That analogy certainly does not apply to women. But the closed-cells generally have higher force but they're slightly more rigid.

The open-cells are, perhaps, slightly weaker, but there's infinite varieties of imaginations and changes that can be made to those two very generic statements. For instance, in the newer stents, if you cut off a larger, laser cut a Nitinol tube,

you will intrinsically get thicker struts, and therefore slightly larger sheath size, but ultimately slightly more strength at the expense of slightly less flexibility. I think for me, the thing that I've learned the most about the newest venous stents,

or using the newer venous dedicated stents, is that you must do very aggressive balloon dilatation pre and post, that's absolutely essential. Regardless of what stent you use. And I'm horrified to see some of the Twitter handles of people using pre-dilatation

with an eight millimeter balloon, then putting in a 20 millimeter Wallstent and then ballooning it again to 14. Absolutely no logic to any of that. So I think you should balloon to the nominal diameter of the stent.

And it is interesting that you get a much higher force when you get that stent to the nominal diameter. The actual physical properties of the stent change when it hits that diameter. So not getting to the diameter of the stent is a huge mistake.

Now, do fractures really matter? We've been looking extensively at this in a variety of the different trials, and it's hard to know. Certainly, luminal reduction does. Fractures, not so sure about. Fractures sound like they're easy to diagnose.

They're actually very difficult. And compression at the inguinal ligament, is it real? It seems to be real. It seems to be more real than I certainly believed, in a certain proportion of patients. Typically skinnier ones, in my experience,

again, skinny females. Flexibility is obviously a big, big issue, and when you think of where your knee goes in relation to your shoulder if you're doing your yoga class, or anything else for that matter, tying your shoelaces,

there's a lot of bend required. And if you think of where we are now in aortic stent grafting compared to where we were when I last had hair, everything has changed. All of the devices have changed.

We went from Ancure, which had 64 steps, through AneuRx, and now, you know, things have moved on way past 2010 as well. So, in terms of my choices, in the USA you've got two choices, you got Wallstent and Z stent.

And if you got a rupture, use a Gore or something like that. In Europe, it's a much more, nuanced and challenging to try and figure out which ones you do. And these are just my choices. Is there any evidence to back them up?

None whatsoever. Have I had problems with most of the stents? Yes. Most of those problems were probably self-induced. I've certainly learned that pre-dilatation and post-dilatation are the essentials.

And flexibility is a lot more important than I would've thought if you had asked me five years ago. Thank you very much.

- Thank you. Thank you again for the invitation, and also my talk concerns the use of new Terumo Aortic stent graft for the arch. And it's the experience of three different countries in Europe. There's no disclosure for this topic.

Just to remind what we have seen, that there is some complication after surgery, with mortality and the stroke rate relatively high. So we try to find some solution. We have seen that we have different options, it could be debranching, but also

we know that there are some complications with this technique, with the type A aortic dissection by retrograde way. And also there's a way popular now, frozen elephant trunk. And you can see on the slide the principle.

But all the patients are not fit for this type of surgery. So different techniques have been developed for endovascular options. And we have seen before the principle of Terumo arch branch endograft.

One of the main advantages is a large window to put the branches in the different carotid and brachiocephalic trunk. And one of the benefit is small, so off-the-shelf technique, with one size for the branch and different size

for the different carotids. This is a more recent experience, it's concerning 15 patients. And you can see the right column that it is. All the patients was considered unfit for conventional surgery.

If we look about more into these for indication, we can see four cases was for zone one, seven cases for zone two, and also four cases for zone three. You can see that the diameter of the ascending aorta, the min is 38,

and for the innominate artery was 15, and then for left carotid was eight. This is one example of what we can obtain with this type of handling of the arch with a complete exclusion of the lesion, and we exclude the left sonography by plyf.

This is another, more complex lesion. It's actually a dissection and the placement of a stent graft in this area. So what are the outcomes of patients? We don't have mortality, one case of hospital mortality.

We don't have any, sorry, we have one stroke, and we can see the different deaths during the follow-up. If we look about the endoleaks, we have one case of type three endoleak started by endovascular technique,

and we have late endoleaks with type one endoleaks. In this situation, it could be very difficult to treat the patient. This is the example of what we can observe at six months with no endoleak and with complete exclusion of the lesion.

But we have seen at one year with some proximal type one endoleak. In this situation, it could be very difficult to exclude this lesion. We cannot propose this for this patient for conventional surgery, so we tried

to find some option. First of all, we tried to fix the other prosthesis to the aortic wall by adjusted technique with a screw, and we can see the fixation of the graft. And later, we go through the,

an arrangement inside the sac, and we put a lot of colors inside so we can see the final results with complete exclusion. So to conclude, I think that this technique is very useful and we can have good success with this option, and there's a very low

rate of disabling stroke and endoleaks. But, of course, we need more information, more data. Thank you very much for your attention.

- [Audience Member 1] So I have a question for Dr. Jackson, but maybe everybody else on the panel can chip in, and it just has to do with what your first intervention is going to be for a focal stenosis in a vein graft, and I guess, Ben, my question is, in general, is your first time you intervene going to be a drug-eluding stent?

Our strategy generally has been, to start with, a cutting balloon based on a series, I think it was from Schneider, who compared it and saw pretty good results. Nowadays, I think maybe I'd do that, and at the same time then put a drug-coated balloon in, and that's

increasing the cost, there's no good data to say that's better than just a cutting balloon, but I think I might do that and reserve the drug-eluding stent for the second time or third time. So my question is, what's your intervention the first time you intervene endovascularly

for a focal vein graft stenosis? - [Dr. Benjamin Jackson] So if you're not going to do an open revision, right, we'll preface with that, I'll use a coronary drug-eluding stent first. - [Audience Member 1] Okay. - [Speaker 1] Okay, so, are you happy with that?

- [Audience Member 1] Well, I was hoping to get other opinions, but if you want to move on, that's fine. - [Speaker 1] Alright, so I'll give you my opinion. I don't think there's anything wrong with putting a stent. The idea that the stent is going to be occupying space and is going to mess up your next procedure, I think

that's more out of fear than actually the reality. We have patients that in the SFA popliteal segmentary, we're on the fifth round of stents, and you'd be surprised how you can distend the fifth stent inside the SFA. I never thought it was possible, actually.

We have some IBIS documentation showing at least a five millimeter lumen after you do that thing. So I'm not so concerned about that. The problem with this, and I agree with putting a stent because there's a very rigid lesion sometimes. It's not easy to balloon them, it's not easy to

because usually the cutting balloon probably already got the lumen that you want, but then definitely it increases the cost that way. Again, who knows the other answer. Anybody else? - [Dr. Chris Metzger] Yeah, a brief comment.

I don't think all vein graft lesions are alike, so it depends if it's diffused or focal. The other thing is, I think your response to initial therapy is important, so if you do your balloon, cutting balloon, then it's going to tell you recoil, not recoil,

and the other thing I would say is intravascular ultrasound, if you're in doubt on how large that is, I think helps a lot. So, you know, if it's very focal, very high grade, I think drug-eluding stent is perfect, the question is what size, IBIS helps with that.

Otherwise, I think your strategy for longer disease might be a reasonable strategy as well. - [Dr. George Adams] And the only other comment I'd make is if there is a thrombotic component like Chris was saying, depending on the client morphology I might use laser atherectomy followed by a

biologic therapy such as a drug-coated balloon. - [Speaker 1] Yes, sir? - [Audience Member 2] About that last presentation, are you using any type of anticoagulation when you do these PTFE tibial bypasses, or were the groups comparable where there's only antiplatelet

therapy in the vein grafts and in the prosthetic grafts, or are you putting all of them on factor 10A inhibitor coumadin? - [Dr. Peter Lin] So our patient, we typically put them on aspirin, and for the Propaten we don't add any distal antiplatelet agents.

- [Audience Member 2] Because that's a lot better than historical reports, probably. I wondered, why do you think it shows so much better, even with previous vein cusp patches? - [Dr. Peter Lin] So I think the patch matters, and I also think that over the years, we also learned

a whole lot about the distal anastomotic patch, because time won't let me tell you something and go into great detail. So the patch, you know, we make, is about two to two and a half centimeter long, so that length of the patch is almost twice the length of

the diameter of the graft itself, so I think that's also a significant factor. So it's something that previous literature has not really emphasized on, and the PTFE ideally should be connected to the proximal one-third, instead of distal one-third, so that also may make

some of the same area boost configuration. So the whole idea is you want to make the patch as long distally as possible. So some of the variations, I think, have in part helped, and ideally is that the vein is available, that would be great, if not we also have used a lot

of bovine patch as our patch material, so that thing I think made a lot of difference. So I don't think, all things considered, antiplatelet agents played a huge role, but I think the distal anastomotic compliance mismatch, if we can alleviate that, it will help your outcome.

- [Speaker 1] So Peter, you believe that those grafts have a thrombotic threshold, or you think there's no thrombotic threshold for PTFE? - [Dr. Peter Lin] Oh, I think so. - [Speaker 1] Let me just continue my thought process. So if there is a thrombotic threshold, it doesn't matter

how long you're going to put the vein patch. You can put a 16 millimeter vein patch, it's not going to make any difference, if you reach that thrombotic threshold. So then we come to the criticism that maybe you're selecting the cases

with good runoff, and in the good runoff, it's hard to show a difference between vein and (unintelligible) bonded with the patch, maybe. But if you are to do those terrible cases that have an isolated TPO segment, or they're all the way on the foot or the plantar arteries, that maybe the

saphenous vein will come up much better than this. What do you think? - [Dr. Peter Lin] Well, these are all great points. It's hard to discern based on a single yes or no answer. Saphenous vein has certain limitations, although I believe there's still a standard of care

in terms of conduit choice. Often times the veins are sclerotic, we're limited by vein length, so again, I brought up some points that in some patients we can only connect it to a superficial femoral, even a popliteal bypass because the vein is not long enough.

So PTFE, while it's not perfect in some scenarios, it does have advantages, because I can connect it even to the external iliac artery, I can connect at the common femoral artery, so that's that benefit. I did mention very briefly in our multi-vein analysis, the single vessel runoff is the (unintelligible) runoff.

So in those cases, you're going to have bad outcome no matter what kind of conduit you use, I do believe that, but in general we'd just use aspirin for that patient. But I believe that if we do believe there's an underlying prothrombotic condition, we would add additional anticoagulants, but that's not typical routine practice.

- [Speaker 1] Alright, I just want to add that in poor runoff situations, the vein clearly does better, and it works for a long time. We had published three years ago, on plantar arteries in branches of tibial vessels in the foot, and they did work, only with vein.

Everything else kind of failed, even with the fistulas. Yes, sir? - [Audience Member 3] I have just a quick question about the Phoenix device, a two part question. A, do you use it with a filter, or can you use it with a filter, and two, do you use it as a standalone therapy

or adjunct to a drug-eluding balloon or anything else? - [Dr. George Adams] So, in general, atherectomy is always with adjunct balloon angioplasty. In regards to the filter, especially with the Phoenix device, you have to be careful and very selective with the wire that you use,

you want to use a nitinol wire. So for a filter usually I use a free-floating filter, the NAV-6, and you can't use it over that nitinol wire, you have to use a graduated tip wire, usually a Viper or a Viper Flex. So I would select cases where you would not use

a filter specifically with this device, so if you have a long lesion or if there's any thrombotic component to it, I'd be very conscientious of using this device with that. - [Speaker 1] Thank you. Any questions from the panel?

Because I have a few questions. - [Dr. George Adams] Actually, it was I think very stimulating as to the conversation we just had, in regards to thrombotic or anticoagulants with antiplatelets, you know. Recently the COMPASS trial just came out, as well

as an E-PAD which was more or less a pilot study, showing that just taking peripheral arterial disease regardless of grafts, there seems to be a thrombotic component, and factor 10A inhibitors may have benefit in addition to antiplatelet therapy in regards to all PAD patients.

I think it's a very interesting discussion. - [Speaker 1] I have a question, Dr. Dorigo. Once you identify the high risk group of patients, is there any strategy to modify them to improve them and get them to another category? - [Dr. Walter Dorigo] Most of the perimeters we

examined were not modifiable. Age, extension of disease, coronary artery disease. Maybe one possibility is to improve the runoff status but, in concomitance with the intervention, one can try to improve the runoff score. But four out of five factors were not modifiable.

- [Speaker 1] Thank you, okay. I have one more question. So, do you do distal bypasses? - [Speaker 2] We do distal bypasses, I personally don't. I have a big group, I have three people in my group that only do distal bypasses.

- [Speaker 1] So, it says a patient in your group does not have a saphenous vein, and has a limited runoff. How will you approach there? - [Speaker 2] Well, that was a question I would want to ask both Walter and Peter.

Is there a role for composite bypasses? Because we do it quite a lot where we only have shorter parts of vein available, shorter lengths of vein available, we would do the above-knee PTFE, and then cross the knee with the vein. But I remember that last year at this meeting,

the Americans said that it's worse results, but we still do it. - [Dr. Walter Dorigo] Yes, in the registry are a crude amount, so about one, 150 composite bypasses with the short or long segmental vein and the part of PTFE graft, we use it.

And the results are not particularly better than those with the grafts, but it's likely better. - [Speaker 1] Right, I want to ask the panel, if you have the use the common femoral artery as an in-flow, and this vessel has been used

a few times before, what do you prefer to use? The external iliac, redo the groin again, or use the deep femoral as an in-flow? We'll start with Peter Lin. - [Dr. Peter Lin] I would probably go to external iliac,

because higher, it's got proximal better vessels, and it's greater diameter, all things considered. If you go deep femoral, you still got to navigate across a stenotic plaque common femoral artery. - [Speaker 1] No, it's not stenotic, it's a normal vessel. - [Dr. Peter Lin] So, I would, if all had been equal,

obviously common femoral might be better, but if common femoral's highly disease, stented and treated, and so there's a lot of scar tissue, I'd probably go with external iliac. - [Speaker 1] Okay, anybody else want to make a comment on what they preferentially use for in-flow?

- [Speaker 2] It depends what material you're going to use. If we use the vein, we go back to the common femoral, if we use prosthetic material, we would prefer to have a site where it's easier to go in and lower the risk of infection. - [Speaker 1] Right. I'll say that it depends on

the length, if I have enough length just to go deep femoral, I'll go deep femoral preferentially, but I have gone to the external iliac with a vein and have had no problem with kinking or anything, it would just make a tunnel lateral to the artery. We don't go medially because there are too many

branches there, but laterally, and you can do the anastomosis vein, and it only adds about two, three centimeters of length when you get it just above the inguinal ligament. With that, I'm going to thank the speakers, it was a great conference, and call the next moderators, please.

- Thank you very much, Gustavo, you read the abstract so now my task is to convince you that this very counter-intuitive technique actually works, you are familiar with Petticoat, cover stent to close a proximal entry tear and then uncover stents, bear stents, downstream. This what it would look like when we open up

the bare stent, you know dissect the aorta. So here's a case example, acute type B with malperfusion, the true lumen is sickle shaped, virtually occluded. So we use Petticoat, and we end up with a nice reopening of the true lumen, it is tagged here in green, however if you look more closely you see that here

wrapping around the true lumen there is a perfused false lumen. This is not an exception, not a complication, this is what happens in most cases, because there are always reentries in the celiac portion of the aorta.

So the Stablise concept was introduced by Australian group of Nixon, Peter Mossop in 2012, after you do the Petticoat, you are going to voluntarily balloon inside both the stent graft and the bare stents in order to disrupt, to fracture the lamel, obtain a single-channeled aorta.

This is what it looks like at TEE, after deployment of the stent graft, you see the stent graft does not open up completely, there is still some false lumen here, but after the ballooning, it is completely open. So the results were immediately very, very good, however technique did not gain a lot of consensus,

mainly because people were afraid of rupturing the aorta, they dissect the aorta. So here's a Stabilise case, once again, acute setting, malperfusion, we do a carotid subclavian bypass because we are going to cover the subclavian artery, we deploy

the cover stent graft, then with one stent overlap, we deploy two bare stent devices all the way down to the iliacs and then we start ballooning from the second stent down, so you see Coda balloon is used here, but only inside the cover stent with fabric.

And then more distally we are using a valvuloplastic balloon, which is noncompliant, and decides to be not larger than the aorta. So, I need probably to go here, this is the final result, you can see from the cross-sections that the dissection is completely gone and

the aorta is practically healed. So you might need also to address reentries at the iliac levels, attention if you have vessels that only come from the false lumen, we want to protect them during the ballooning, so we have a sheath inside this target vessel, and we are

going to use a stent afterwards to avoid fragments of the intima to get into the ostium of the artery. And this is a one-year control, so as you can see there is a complete remodeling of the aorta, the aorta is no longer dissected, it's a single channel vessel, here we can see stents in two vessels that came

from the false lumen, so very satisfactory. Once again, please remember, we use compliant latex balloons only inside the the cover stent graft, and in the bare stents we use non-compliant balloons. We have published our first cases, you can find more details in the journal paper, so in conclusion,

dear colleagues, Stabilise does work, however we do need to collect high-quality data and the international registry is the way to do this, we have the Stabilise registry which is approved by our ethical committee, we have this group of initial friends that are participating,

however this registry is physician initiated, it's on a voluntary base, it is not supported by industry, so we need all the possible help in order to get patients as quickly as possible, please join, just contact us at this email, we'd be more than happy to include everybody who is

doing this technique according to this protocol, in order to have hard data as soon as possible, thank you very much for your attention.

- I think by definition this whole session today has been about challenging vascular access cases. Here's my disclosures. I went into vascular surgery, I think I made the decision when I was either a fourth year medical student or early on in internship because

what intrigued me the most was that it seemed like vascular surgeons were only limited by their imagination in what we could do to help our patients and I think these access challenges are perfect examples of this. There's going to be a couple talks coming up

about central vein occlusion so I won't be really touching on that. I just have a couple of examples of what I consider challenging cases. So where do the challenges exist? Well, first, in creating an access,

we may have a challenge in trying to figure out what's going to be the best new access for a patient who's not ever had one. Then we are frequently faced with challenges of re-establishing an AV fistula or an AV graft for a patient.

This may be for someone who's had a complication requiring removal of their access, or the patient who was fortunate to get a transplant but then ended up with a transplant rejection and now you need to re-establish access. There's definitely a lot of clinical challenges

maintaining access: Treating anastomotic lesions, cannulation zone lesions, and venous outflow pathology. And we just heard a nice presentation about some of the complications of bleeding, infection, and ischemia. So I'll just start with a case of a patient

who needed to establish access. So this is a 37-year-old African-American female. She's got oxygen-dependent COPD and she's still smoking. Her BMI is 37, she's left handed, she has diabetes, and she has lupus. Her access to date - now she's been on hemodialysis

for six months, all through multiple tunneled catheters that have been repeatedly having to be removed for infection and she was actually transferred from one of our more rural hospitals into town because she had a infected tunneled dialysis catheter in her femoral region.

She had been deemed a very poor candidate for an AV fistula or AV graft because of small veins. So the challenges - she is morbidly obese, she needs immediate access, and she has suboptimal anatomy. So our plan, again, she's left handed. We decided to do a right upper extremity graft

but the plan was to first explore her axillary vein and do a venogram. So in doing that, we explored her axillary vein, did a venogram, and you can see she's got fairly extensive central vein disease already. Now, she had had multiple catheters.

So this is a venogram through a 5-French sheath in the brachial vein in the axilla, showing a diffusely diseased central vein. So at this point, the decision was made to go ahead and angioplasty the vein with a 9-millimeter balloon through a 9-French sheath.

And we got a pretty reasonable result to create venous outflow for our planned graft. You can see in the image there, for my venous outflow I've placed a Gore Hybrid graft and extended that with a Viabahn to help support the central vein disease. And now to try and get rid of her catheters,

we went ahead and did a tapered 4-7 Acuseal graft connected to the brachial artery in the axilla. And we chose the taper mostly because, as you can see, she has a pretty small high brachial artery in her axilla. And then we connected the Acuseal graft to the other end of the Gore Hybrid graft,

so at least in the cannulation zone we have an immediate cannualation graft. And this is the venous limb of the graft connected into the Gore hybrid graft, which then communicates directly into the axillary vein and brachiocephalic vein.

So we were able to establish a graft for this patient that could be used immediately, get rid of her tunneled catheter. Again, the challenges were she's morbidly obese, she needs immediate access, and she has suboptimal anatomy, and the solution was a right upper arm loop AV graft

with an early cannulation segment to immediately get rid of her tunneled catheter. Then we used the Gore Hybrid graft with the 9-millimeter nitinol-reinforced segment to help deal with the preexisting venous outflow disease that she had, and we were able to keep this patient

free of a catheter with a functioning access for about 13 months. So here's another case. This is in a steal patient, so I think it's incredibly important that every patient that presents with access-induced ischemia to have a complete angiogram

of the extremity to make sure they don't have occult inflow disease, which we occasionally see. So this patient had a functioning upper arm graft and developed pretty severe ischemic pain in her hand. So you can see, here's the graft, venous outflow, and she actually has,

for the steal patients we see, she actually had pretty decent flow down her brachial artery and radial and ulnar artery even into the hand, even with the graft patent, which is usually not the case. In fact, we really challenged the diagnosis of ischemia for quite some time, but the pressures that she had,

her digital-brachial index was less than 0.5. So we went ahead and did a drill. We've tried to eliminate the morbidity of the drill bit - so we now do 100% of our drills when we're going to use saphenous vein with endoscopic vein harvest, which it's basically an outpatient procedure now,

and we've had very good success. And here you can see the completion angiogram and just the difference in her hand perfusion. And then the final case, this is a patient that got an AV graft created at the access center by an interventional nephrologist,

and in the ensuing seven months was treated seven different times for problems, showed up at my office with a cold blue hand. When we duplexed her, we couldn't see any flow beyond the AV graft anastomosis. So I chose to do a transfemoral arteriogram

and what you can see here, she's got a completely dissected subclavian axillary artery, and this goes all the way into her arterial anastomosis. So this is all completely dissected from one of her interventions at the access center. And this is the kind of case that reminded me

of one of my mentors, Roger Gregory. He used to say, "I don't wan "I just want out of the trap." So what we ended up doing was, I actually couldn't get into the true lumen from antegrade, so I retrograde accessed

her brachial artery and was able to just re-establish flow all the way down. I ended up intentionally covering the entry into her AV graft to get that out of the circuit and just recover her hand, and she's actually been catheter-dependent ever since

because she really didn't want to take any more chances. Thank you very much.

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