Create an account and get 3 free clips per day.
Chapters
Surveillance Protocol And Reinterventions After F/B/EVAR
Surveillance Protocol And Reinterventions After F/B/EVAR
aneurysmangiographicaorticarteryBbranchbranchedcatheterizationcatheterizedceliaccommoncommon iliacembolizationembolizedendoleakendoleaksevarFfenestratedfenestrationFEVARgastricgrafthepatichypogastriciiiciliacimplantleftleft renalmayomicrocatheternidusOnyx EmbolizationparaplegiapreoperativeproximalreinterventionreinterventionsrenalrepairreperfusionscanstentStent graftsuperselectivesurgicalTEVARtherapeuticthoracicthoracoabdominaltreatedtypeType II Endoleak with aneurysm growth of 1.5 cmVeithvisceral
How To Manage A Chronically Diseased Aorta Distal To A Previous Surgical Or Endograft Treated TAAD
How To Manage A Chronically Diseased Aorta Distal To A Previous Surgical Or Endograft Treated TAAD
anastomoticaneurysmalaortaaorticarchballooningBEVARCcardiacchimneychronicCustom-made or Home-made scallop or large fenestrationdescendingdevicedilatationdissectiondistalDistal anastomotic new entry after acute type 1 aortic dissection repairDistal implantation in a fenestrated aorta to deploy properlyDistal sealingDouble branched stent graftembolizationendoleaksendovascularEndovascular fenestrationevarfenestratedfenestrationFEVARFrozen elephant trunk techniquegraftHybrid total arch replacementinfrarenalintimalocclusionsOpen fenestrationparallelpatientsprogressionproximalProximal scallop stent graftrepairReverse endovascular Hemi-Arch repairrisksSAT DebranchingsealingSpot stenting of the tearSTABILISE conceptSTABILISE TechniquestentgraftstentingteartechniquetechniquesThoraflexthrombosedtrunkwichesy-plug technique
Update On The Spider Hybrid Graft For Partially Open TAAA Repair Without A Thoracotomy: How It Works, Clinical Experience, Advantages And Limitations
Update On The Spider Hybrid Graft For Partially Open TAAA Repair Without A Thoracotomy: How It Works, Clinical Experience, Advantages And Limitations
abdominaladvantagesaorticbranchescardiopulmonarycenterschallengingcompletecordcrawforddecreasededicateddeviceendovascularfinallyfollowupfrozeniliacintestinalischemicmarkedmortalityOpen repairpathologypigsrepairrevealedreversedspinalstenttechniquetechnologiesthoracicvisceral
How To Treat By EVAR Complex Aorto-Iliac AAAs In Patients With Renal Transplants, Horseshoe Or Pelvic Kidneys: Technical Tips
How To Treat By EVAR Complex Aorto-Iliac AAAs In Patients With Renal Transplants, Horseshoe Or Pelvic Kidneys: Technical Tips
accessoryaneurysmalaneurysmsantegradeaorticapproacharteriesarteryatypicalbifurcationbypasscontralateraldistalembolizationendoendograftingendovascularevarfairlyfemoralfenestratedflowfollowuphybridhypogastriciliacincisionmaintainmaneuversmultipleocclusiveOpen Hybridoptionspatientspelvicreconstructionreconstructionsreinterventionsrenalrenal arteryrenalsrepairsurvival
Step-By-Step Technical Tips For Pharmaco-Mechanical Intervention For PE
Step-By-Step Technical Tips For Pharmaco-Mechanical Intervention For PE
EKOS EkoSonic Mach 4eEkoSonicEndovascular system for ultrasound accelerated thrombolysisPETenectaplasetherapeutic
New Devices For False Lumen Obliteration With TBADs: Indications And Results
New Devices For False Lumen Obliteration With TBADs: Indications And Results
aneurysmangiographyaortaballooningCcentimeterdilatorendograftendovascularEndovascular DevicefenestratedgraftiliacimplantedlumenoccludeoccluderoccludersoccludesremodelingstentStent graftstentstechniqueTEVARtherapeuticthoracicthoracoabdominalVeithy-plugyplug
VICI Stent Trial Update
VICI Stent Trial Update
acuteBoston ScientificchronicdefinitionsdifferencesDVTendpointfeasibilityinclusioning Stent / Venovo (Bard Medical) - Venous Stent System / Abre (Medtronic) - Venous Self-Exping Stent SystemivusnitinolocclusionocclusionspatencypatientspivotalproximalstenttermstherapeuticthrombotictrialsvenousVenous Stent SystemViciZilver Vena (Cook Medical) - Venous Self-Exp
Tips And Tricks For Thrombo-Embolectomy For Clot Removal From All Arteries Using The Indigo System: How To Measure Success
Tips And Tricks For Thrombo-Embolectomy For Clot Removal From All Arteries Using The Indigo System: How To Measure Success
Aspiration SystemAspiration ThrombectomyCovered stentInjured infa-renal aorta with embolegenic thrombusPenumbraPenumbra’s Indigotherapeutic
Chimney TEVAR (Ch/TEVAR) To Treat Aortic Arch Lesions: Long-Term Good Outcomes And How To Achieve Them
Chimney TEVAR (Ch/TEVAR) To Treat Aortic Arch Lesions: Long-Term Good Outcomes And How To Achieve Them
adenosineanatomiesaneurysmalaorticarchArch ChimneyascendingatrialballooncarotidcentimeterchimneychroniccommondissectionsendograftsendoprosthesesendovascularlyexclusionexpandablefenestratedgraftsleftLSA revascularizationmalperfusionmetachronousoutcomespatientsplacementproximalrepairsrequiringrevascularizationriskseriesstentsubclaviansubsequentTEVARunintendedunplannedvariedventricularzone
Status Of Dual Layer Stents For CAS: Is Acute Occlusion An Issue And How To Avoid It
Status Of Dual Layer Stents For CAS: Is Acute Occlusion An Issue And How To Avoid It
acuteadequateantiplateletappositionarterybridgingcarotidcarotid stentcerebrovascularclopidogreldeploymentdualhighlightintravenouslylayermaneuvermeaningmedicationobservedocclusionpatientpatientsperformedporepredisposingpreparationpublicationsRoadSaverstenosisstentstentingstrokeTerumo interventional systemstherapythrombogenicthrombogenicityVeithwallstent
How Best To Size (Diameter) Endografts For TEVAR: For Treatment Of Aneurysms, TBADs And Traumatic Aortic Injuries
How Best To Size (Diameter) Endografts For TEVAR: For Treatment Of Aneurysms, TBADs And Traumatic Aortic Injuries
accurateanatomyaneurysmaortaarchAssociatesavoidballoonconformable thoracic endoprosthesisdevicesdiameterdissectiongoreimagingincreasedivusnitinoloversizeoversizingpatientpatientsrecognizeretrogradesizingstentTAG conformabletaperingTEVARtrauma
Fully Percutaneous EVAR For RAAAs: Advantages, Contraindications And Technical Tips
Fully Percutaneous EVAR For RAAAs: Advantages, Contraindications And Technical Tips
abdominalaccessanesthesiaaneurysmaneurysmsaorticarterybaselinecolorconventionalcREVARcutdowndecreasedendovascularevarexposurefemoralimagingincreasedlengthMicropuncture TechniqueneedleoperativeoutcomespatientspercutaneousPEVARplacingregardrepairrepairsREVARRumel mediated Techniquerupturedsheathstatisticallysurgicalsuturestargettechniqueunderwentutilizing
Advantages Of The Gore VBX Balloon Expandable Stent-Graft For F/EVAR, Ch/EVAR And Aorto-Iliac Occlusive Disease
Advantages Of The Gore VBX Balloon Expandable Stent-Graft For F/EVAR, Ch/EVAR And Aorto-Iliac Occlusive Disease
anatomiesaneurysmaneurysmsaortobifemoralaortoiliacarterybrachialbranchcatheterizedCHcustomizablecustomizedistallyendovascularevarexcellentFfenestratedFenestrated GraftfenestrationflarefollowupGORE MedicalGore Viabahn VBXgraftgraftshypogastriciliaciliacsmodelingoccludedocclusiveparallelpatencyperfusionproximalpseudoaneurysmPseudoaneurysm of the proximal juxtarenal graft anastomosisptferenalsSelective Catheterization of the Right CIA to Hypogastric Arterystenosisstentstent graft systemstentstherapeuticVBX Stent Graftvesselvesselsvisceral
New Techniques In Endovascular Aspiration Thrombectomy: The World Has Changed For Treatment And Rescue Clot Extraction With Penumbra Indigo Suction Devices In Various Vascular Beds
New Techniques In Endovascular Aspiration Thrombectomy: The World Has Changed For Treatment And Rescue Clot Extraction With Penumbra Indigo Suction Devices In Various Vascular Beds
Acute Bowel IschemiaAspiration SystemAspiration ThrombectomyOscor Directional Sheath (Oscor) / AngioJet (Boston Scientific) - Thrombectomy SystemPenumbraPenumbra’s IndigoTherapeutic / Diagnostic
How To Use Hybrid Operating Rooms Optimally Beyond Vascular Procedures: How The Availability Of Mobile C-Arms Can Help
How To Use Hybrid Operating Rooms Optimally Beyond Vascular Procedures: How The Availability Of Mobile C-Arms Can Help
accessAscending Aortic Repair - Suture line DehiscenceaugmentbasicallyDirect Percutaneous Puncture - Percutaneous EmbolizationembolizationembolizefusionguidancehybridimagingincisionlaserlocalizationlungmodalitypatientscannedscannerTherapeutic / Diagnostictraumavascular
Technical Tips For The Management Of Cervical And Mediastinal Iatrogenic Artery Injuries: How To Avoid Disasters
Technical Tips For The Management Of Cervical And Mediastinal Iatrogenic Artery Injuries: How To Avoid Disasters
9F Sheath in Lt SCAAbbottaccessarterybrachialcarotidcatheterCordisDual Access (Rt Femora + SC sheath) ttt with suture mediated proglid over 0.035 inch wireendovascularfemoralfrenchgraftiatrogenicimaginginjuriesleftPer-Close suture mediated ProgliderangingsheathstentsubclaviantreatedvarietyvascularvenousvertebralVessel Closure Devicewire
Update On Experience With The Valiant MONA LSA Single Branched TEVAR Device (From Medtronic) To Treat Lesions Involving The Aortic Arch
Update On Experience With The Valiant MONA LSA Single Branched TEVAR Device (From Medtronic) To Treat Lesions Involving The Aortic Arch
12mm BSG34 & 26 mm Distal Extentions to Celiac Artery34mm MSGaccessaneurysmangiogramaorticarteryballoonceliaccenterscomorbiditiesDescending Thoracic Aneurysm 55mmdevicedevicesdiametersendovascularenrollenrollmentfeasibilitygrafthelicalinvestigationalischemialeftmainMedtronicnitinolpatientpatientspivotalproximalrevascularizationstentstent graft systemsubclavianTEVARtherapeuticthoracicthrombusValiant Mona LSAwire
Percutaneous Pharmaco-Mechanical Intervention For PE: Is There A Rationale
Percutaneous Pharmaco-Mechanical Intervention For PE: Is There A Rationale
Angiodynamicsangiovaccannulacircuit for thrombiemboli removalFlowTriever (Infusion aspiration system - Inari) / Penumbra CAT8 (Thromboaspiration system - Penumbra) / AngioJet (Peripheral thrombectomy system - Boston Scientific)therapeutic
Pitfalls Of Percutaneous EVAR (PEVAR) And How To Avoid Them
Pitfalls Of Percutaneous EVAR (PEVAR) And How To Avoid Them
AbbottaccessanesthesiaAngio-Seal (Terumo Medical Corporation) - Closure deviceangiogramangiosealanteriorarteriotomybifurcationboreclampclosuredeployedEndologixevarfailedfailurefemoralgelfoamhemostasislengthmicropunctureobservedoperativePerclose ProGlidepercutaneousPEVARpredictorsprogliderandomizescarringSuture-Mediated Closure (SMC) Systemtechniquetherapeuticveitvenousvessel
Cloud Based System For Image Fusion Techniques With Mobile C-Arms (The Cydar System): How Does It Work And Advantages For All Vascular Interventions
Cloud Based System For Image Fusion Techniques With Mobile C-Arms (The Cydar System): How Does It Work And Advantages For All Vascular Interventions
anatomyaorticaortoiliacAortoiliac occlusive diseasebasedBilateral Kissing StentsbodiesclinicalcontrastCydar EV (Cydar Medical) - Cloud SoftwaredecreasesderivedendovascularevarFEVARfluorofluoroscopyfusionhardwarehybridiliacimageimagesimagingmechanicaloverlaypatientpostureprocedureproximalqualityradiationreductionscanstandardstatisticallytechnologyTEVARTherapeutic / DiagnostictrackingvertebralZiehm ImagingZiehm RFD C-arm
New In Vitro System For Evaluating Optimal Techniques, Main And Branch Endografts, Sizing, Etc. For Ch/EVAR: How It Will Improve Results And Decrease Complications By Leading To Standardized Techniques And Endograft Components
New In Vitro System For Evaluating Optimal Techniques, Main And Branch Endografts, Sizing, Etc. For Ch/EVAR: How It Will Improve Results And Decrease Complications By Leading To Standardized Techniques And Endograft Components
abdominalable covered stent (Advanta V12anatomyaneurysmanterioraorticballoonBalloon Expballoon expandablebehaviorcentersCHchimneyCordiscovereddevicedevicesendovascularEndurantevaluateevarexpandableexpansionforcegraftheterogeneityicastimpactMaquetMedtronicmitralniceoversizingpatencypercentposteriorproximalradialrenalscanstentStent graftstent graft systemStent graft system (INCRAFTstentssuboptimaltechniquetherapeuticversusviabahn
Latest Techniques And New Developments In Treating Leg And Foot Artery Lesions Causing CLTI With Extensive Ischemic Gangrene And Ulceration
Latest Techniques And New Developments In Treating Leg And Foot Artery Lesions Causing CLTI With Extensive Ischemic Gangrene And Ulceration
advancearteryballooncalcifiedcathetercrosscrossingCTO CatheterdevicedistalendovascularlesionmarkerneedleocclusionpatientperformposteriorprofilepullPull the GW - Balloon System TechniquepuncturerobertosucceedtechnicaltechniqueTeleflextherapeutictorqueTurnpike Goldwire
Conformable Sheaths And Other New Techniques To Simplify And Improve The Outcomes Of F/B/EVAR: Upper Extremity Access May Become Largely Unnecessary
Conformable Sheaths And Other New Techniques To Simplify And Improve The Outcomes Of F/B/EVAR: Upper Extremity Access May Become Largely Unnecessary
(Flex introducer sheeth(Steerable guiding sheethaccessaneurysmapproachAptus TourguideballoonBEVARborebrachialceliaccontralateralDestino TwistdownwardDry SealFfenestrationFEVARfrenchglideGORE MedicalMedtronicOscor inc.renalrosenselectionsheathsheathsSteerable guiding sheathstentstrengthsSuprarenal AAA+Duplicated renal arteriestargettechniquetherapeuticvesselvesselswirewires
Longer-Term Results Of The IMPROVE RCT (EVAR vs. Open Repair [OR]) Finally Shows EVAR Is Better Than OR For Ruptured RAAAs: In Terms Of Late Survival, Cost And Fewer Amputations
Longer-Term Results Of The IMPROVE RCT (EVAR vs. Open Repair [OR]) Finally Shows EVAR Is Better Than OR For Ruptured RAAAs: In Terms Of Late Survival, Cost And Fewer Amputations
amputationaneurysmcrossoversendovascularevarmidtermpatientspercentrandomizedrepairrupturedstrategysurvivaltrialunselectedVeithversus
Bailout Rescue Procedures When CEA Is Failing In A Critical Unstable Patient: ICA Stent Or Gore Hybrid Graft Or Standard PTFE Bypass: Indications For Each
Bailout Rescue Procedures When CEA Is Failing In A Critical Unstable Patient: ICA Stent Or Gore Hybrid Graft Or Standard PTFE Bypass: Indications For Each
anastomosisangiogrambailbypasscarotidCarotid bypassCEACFAdurableembolicendarterectomygoregrafthybridHybrid vascular graftinsertedlesionnitinolpatencypatientperioperativeproximalPTAptferestenosisstenosistechniquetransmuralvascular graft
Technical Issues And Experience With MIS2ACE In 50 Patients Undergoing Endo TAAA Repair
Technical Issues And Experience With MIS2ACE In 50 Patients Undergoing Endo TAAA Repair
aneurysmanterioraorticarterycoilcoilingcoilscollateralcordembolizationischemicMIS²ACEocclusionPatentpatientperformsegmentalspinalstenotictechniquetherapeuticthoracoabdominal
Vacuum Assisted Thrombectomy With The Penumbra Indigo System For Visceral And Lower Limb Artery Occlusions
Vacuum Assisted Thrombectomy With The Penumbra Indigo System For Visceral And Lower Limb Artery Occlusions
Aorto-Renal BypassAspiration SystemGore Viabahn VBX (Gore Medical)PenumbraPenumbra’s Indigotherapeutic
DEBATE: All SFA Lesions Can Be Treated Endovascularly: Should They Be: Open Bypass Should Rarely Be Used
DEBATE: All SFA Lesions Can Be Treated Endovascularly: Should They Be: Open Bypass Should Rarely Be Used
AbbottangiogramballooncanalizationdiameterendovascularevarfemoropoplitealhematomaintroducerlesionsocclusionpatencyperformPeripheral stent systempoplitealpunctureretrogradestentsubintimalSuperatechniquetherapeuticthrombosistotaltreatVeith
Value Of Intraprocedural Completion Cone Beam CT After Standard EVARs And Complex EVARs (F/B/EVARs): What To Do If One Does Not Have The Technology
Value Of Intraprocedural Completion Cone Beam CT After Standard EVARs And Complex EVARs (F/B/EVARs): What To Do If One Does Not Have The Technology
4-Vessel FEVARangiographyaortoiliacarchaxialbeamBEVARbifurcatedcalcificationcatheterizecatheterizedcompletionconecone beamcoronaldetectablediagnosticdilatordissectionDissection FlapendoleakevaluatesevarfemorofenestratedFEVARfindingsfusionGE HealthcareinterventionmesentericocclusionoperativelypositiveproceduresprospectiveproximalradiationRadiocontrast agentrotationalstentstudytechnicalthoracoabdominaltriggeredunnecessaryVisipaque
Transcript

This is a 45-year-old construction worker who comes from abroad, he has been operated five years ago abroad. We do not have any history about his operation. He arrived to the hospital with back pain and the Sciatica L5 an AVS score of seven out of ten, and this is his X-ray.

So in the X-ray you can see there's a metallic object right here but something was put there in the operation probably this is a marker of some kind of disc implant but we do not have any other information. So the simple thing is since the operation has been done after 2000, we ask for an MRI, this is MRI.

So this is not a good MRI and of course it's not a non-diagnostic MRI, so what can you do? Well in this case, you can do nothing and go directly for surgery, conservative treatment, injections based on clinical findings, surgery, we prefer to do

a myelogram or an epidurogram depending on which technique you'd like. So in this case, you stick a needle and inject your contrast media in the space and actually you can see the metal artifact it's just irritating the L5 route coming out there. So now you have a pretty precise conception of why it is irritating, this technique is very useful specifically when you have [UNKNOWN] sessions

or surgery in the area that creates metallic artefacts for MRIs and it can help your CT myelo to give you more information.

- Thank you Mr. Chairman. Ladies and gentleman, first of all, I would like to thank Dr. Veith for the honor of the podium. Fenestrated and branched stent graft are becoming a widespread use in the treatment of thoracoabdominal

and pararenal aortic aneurysms. Nevertheless, the risk of reinterventions during the follow-up of these procedures is not negligible. The Mayo Clinic group has recently proposed this classification for endoleaks

after FEVAR and BEVAR, that takes into account all the potential sources of aneurysm sac reperfusion after stent graft implant. If we look at the published data, the reported reintervention rate ranges between three and 25% of cases.

So this is still an open issue. We started our experience with fenestrated and branched stent grafts in January 2016, with 29 patients treated so far, for thoracoabdominal and pararenal/juxtarenal aortic aneurysms. We report an elective mortality rate of 7.7%.

That is significantly higher in urgent settings. We had two cases of transient paraparesis and both of them recovered, and two cases of complete paraplegia after urgent procedures, and both of them died. This is the surveillance protocol we applied

to the 25 patients that survived the first operation. As you can see here, we used to do a CT scan prior to discharge, and then again at three and 12 months after the intervention, and yearly thereafter, and according to our experience

there is no room for ultrasound examination in the follow-up of these procedures. We report five reinterventions according for 20% of cases. All of them were due to endoleaks and were fixed with bridging stent relining,

or embolization in case of type II, with no complications, no mortality. I'm going to show you a couple of cases from our series. A 66 years old man, a very complex surgical history. In 2005 he underwent open repair of descending thoracic aneurysm.

In 2009, a surgical debranching of visceral vessels followed by TEVAR for a type III thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms. In 2016, the implant of a tube fenestrated stent-graft to fix a distal type I endoleak. And two years later the patient was readmitted

for a type II endoleak with aneurysm growth of more than one centimeter. This is the preoperative CT scan, and you see now the type II endoleak that comes from a left gastric artery that independently arises from the aneurysm sac.

This is the endoleak route that starts from a branch of the hepatic artery with retrograde flow into the left gastric artery, and then into the aneurysm sac. We approached this case from below through the fenestration for the SMA and the celiac trunk,

and here on the left side you see the superselective catheterization of the branch of the hepatic artery, and on the right side the microcatheter that has reached the nidus of the endoleak. We then embolized with onyx the endoleak

and the feeding vessel, and this is the nice final result in two different angiographic projections. Another case, a 76 years old man. In 2008, open repair for a AAA and right common iliac aneurysm.

Eight years later, the implant of a T-branch stent graft for a recurrent type IV thoracoabdominal aneurysm. And one year later, the patient was admitted again for a type IIIc endoleak, plus aneurysm of the left common iliac artery. This is the CT scan of this patient.

You will see here the endoleak at the level of the left renal branch here, and the aneurysm of the left common iliac just below the stent graft. We first treated the iliac aneurysm implanting an iliac branched device on the left side,

so preserving the left hypogastric artery. And in the same operation, from a bowl, we catheterized the left renal branch and fixed the endoleak that you see on the left side, with a total stent relining, with a nice final result on the right side.

And this is the CT scan follow-up one year after the reintervention. No endoleak at the level of the left renal branch, and nice exclusion of the left common iliac aneurysm. In conclusion, ladies and gentlemen, the risk of type I endoleak after FEVAR and BEVAR

is very low when the repair is planning with an adequate proximal sealing zone as we heard before from Professor Verhoeven. Much of reinterventions are due to type II and III endoleaks that can be treated by embolization or stent reinforcement. Last, but not least, the strict follow-up program

with CT scan is of paramount importance after these procedures. I thank you very much for your attention.

- These are my disclosures. What we learned from long term follow-up after a type A dissection is that when you get a patent false lumen, you may have higher risk of aneurysmal formation during the follow-up. Proximal sealing in the arch

remains a big problem for many patients. When they have distal anastomotic new entries, they will have more proportion of having dilatation in the descending aorta. Of course we've seen that hybrid total arch replacement seems to be the gold standard

and from our experience, it is important in chronic cases to make a distal implantation of the device in the fenestrated aorta in order to have a proper deployment. In patients that are not fit for open surgery, double branched stentgrafts are very useful,

and what we've learned from the experience of stiff along is probably that the best results are in this indication despite supra-aortic trunk canulations and the risk of strokes. But definitely believe that,

for endovascular solutions in the arch, the more simple you do it, and the better the result will be. We propose this reverse endovascular hemi-arch repair with scallop or large fenestration that made on the supra-aortic trunks,

and this can be made on the basis of a custom-made, or a homemade device, and it's pretty very useful, especially when the aortic valve has been replaced and the device is just deployed like standard graft to give you a correct sealing in the arch.

There are many other techniques like the old supra-aortic trunk debranching, it's now an old technique. And Chimneys, parallel and sandwich that are off market. The best way to go is probably to have a good collaboration

with a cardiac surgeon as an aortic team in order to land your graft into an initially prepared landing zone. Once you've done with the arch, aneurysmal progression will probably go on in the descending aorta,

despite this correct proximal sealing that what we observe in the type B dissection treated by TVAR, all the distal re-entry tear make that that almost two third of the patients still have aneurysmal progression at five years.

In this indication, we still do stabilise when it's possible, stabilise technique in chronically-diseased aorta. We need to have adapted sizing of the distal stentgraft and of the bare stent. Stiffness of the intimal flap can be, of course,

an issue but we didn't have any problems with the 16 patients we've treated so far. Partially thrombosed false lumen may be at risk of distal embolization and you have to keep in my that if the diameter of the descending aorta

is more than 42 millimeter, this technique cannot be done. See that case of chronic dissection we were able to open, we do pre-canulation of the left renal artery in order to make sure that we don't lose the vessel.

You can combine these different techniques, so Thoraflex with the stabilise technique will give you complete repair up to the level of the infrarenal aorta, can also combine with endovascular means like this proximal scallop stentgraft.

We're able to have proximal and distal sealing with a good result at the long term follow-up. Open fenestration was also proposed by Eric Rosselli during the first cardiac arrest and go down on the descending aorta, make an open fenestration,

in order to prepare a distal landing zone and this paper was very interesting, published in 2011. And that's about what also tee-low-cold-bal-daz with the Kickerbocker technique, just ballooning and making the fenestration

with a custom graft that is larger. We proposed to do this endovascular fenestration with a endovascular scissors that we recently published in the European Journal of Vascular/Endovascular Surgery. And when all these techniques are not feasible,

of course FEVAR and branch EVAR are possible. They need difficult planning and we see that in expert hands, there are still many complications such as endoleaks in the long curves. Other occlusions techniques have been proposed,

especially the candy plug or other plugs. Stentgraft occlusion, spot stentgraft stenting can be also a solution in few cases. And keep in mind that open repair is the gold standard, of course, as a back up in good hands,

in young patients, Coselli reports very low mortality of three to four percent with low spinal cord ischemia. So, in conclusion, we have three take-home messages. We have to do no compromise on proximal sealing and we have many devices for that. An aggressive management of the distal tear

will give you a longterm good result of remodeling, and we still do stabilise as a first indication when it is possible. And, of course, these patients are probably the most difficult we have to treat and they need to be managed by an aortic team,

work cardiac surgeons, vascular/endovascular surgeons, cardiologist and angiologist. Thank you for your attention.

- These are my disclosures. So, open repair for thoracic abdominal aortic disease is still challenging and associated with major tissue trauma. Associated to this, there is a marked decrease in open procedures overall, especially also in dedicated centers

like this one in Houston, where you see a marked decrease to almost half of procedures annually done previously. Voladus actually was inventing a new road to treating these challenging pathologies. And up to now, we have the opportunity to cover

actually every pathology in the entire aortic route by complete endovascular means. A major analysis concluded current results treated with branched and multi-branched devices. However, still revealing a marked mortality rate and also overall morbidity rate.

And there is this issue which is not solved even with stage techniques using different and various technologies here, in terms of spinal cord ischemia. And also, the MISACE concept is still challenging and long term results are missing. Endovascular advantages are definitely there.

Because there's no clamping, no cardiopulmonary bypass. No arrests, and reduced excess trauma. And after all, a repair during the engine actually is running. The SPIDER-graft idea actually came from the Frozen Elephant Trunk, which is actually now almost

always needed or done to repair the aortic route and the aortic arch. The idea came to use this device in a reversed technique, finally ending up in this new SPIDER-graft device, as we call it. The first in men with this reversed

Frozen Elephant Technique was performed and also published by our group two years ago. However, in the meanwhile, we developed, did a lot of development on this graft, finally ending up in the third generation of this new graft, including modifications

like nose cone, like hooks, and the beginning of the stent graph part, we reinforced the ring-stents. And we reattached the side branches according to the intestinal branches. And in addition, we attached

a loop-graft for the lumbar arteries. So the way of deployment is shown by several steps. You have the pathology on the left, and the device on the right. We start with an attachment with one of the branches on the common iliac artery, followed then by puncture

and introducing the stent graph part into the thoracic abdominal aorta. When this is deployed, all the blood that comes running down through the stent graft part into over this side branch. And enables a retrograde flow into the entire intestinum.

Then we followup with sequential cross trampling of all visceral arteries. And finally we end up with this complete new so-called hybrid procedure. In an animal protocol, we compared six domestic pigs receiving a Crawford repair with six pigs

receiving a SPIDER-graft repair. With a dedicated study protocol, the results of this study finally revealed overall a marked reduction of total ischemic intestinal time, down from 88 minutes to 4.3 minutes.

Also, the flow measurements of all branches showed very sufficient flows. And in addition to this, a fluorescent micropiece technology finally revealed a marked better spinal cord profusion in the SPIDER-graft treated pigs compared to the Crawford pigs.

So I come to my conclusion. Open thoracic abdominal repair is declining, and limited to a young patient group, especially with genetic aortic syndromes. Clinical need for alternative approaches is due to a high mortality and morbidity,

even with the introduction of complete endovascular repair. The reverse Frozen Elephant Trunk technique with the SPIDER-graft combines the advantages of both technologies and finally can reveal you to good results in an animal model.

And here I come to my end. And I also want to invite you to the two major meetings of the European Society for next year. Thank you very much.

- Good morning, thank you, Dr. Veith, for the invitation. My disclosures. So, renal artery anomalies, fairly rare. Renal ectopia and fusion, leading to horseshoe kidneys or pelvic kidneys, are fairly rare, in less than one percent of the population. Renal transplants, that is patients with existing

renal transplants who develop aneurysms, clearly these are patients who are 10 to 20 or more years beyond their initial transplantation, or maybe an increasing number of patients that are developing aneurysms and are treated. All of these involve a renal artery origin that is

near the aortic bifurcation or into the iliac arteries, making potential repair options limited. So this is a personal, clinical series, over an eight year span, when I was at the University of South Florida & Tampa, that's 18 patients, nine renal transplants, six congenital

pelvic kidneys, three horseshoe kidneys, with varied aorto-iliac aneurysmal pathologies, it leaves half of these patients have iliac artery pathologies on top of their aortic aneurysms, or in place of the making repair options fairly difficult. Over half of the patients had renal insufficiency

and renal protective maneuvers were used in all patients in this trial with those measures listed on the slide. All of these were elective cases, all were technically successful, with a fair amount of followup afterward. The reconstruction priorities or goals of the operation are to maintain blood flow to that atypical kidney,

except in circumstances where there were multiple renal arteries, and then a small accessory renal artery would be covered with a potential endovascular solution, and to exclude the aneurysms with adequate fixation lengths. So, in this experience, we were able, I was able to treat eight of the 18 patients with a fairly straightforward

endovascular solution, aorto-biiliac or aorto-aortic endografts. There were four patients all requiring open reconstructions without any obvious endovascular or hybrid options, but I'd like to focus on these hybrid options, several of these, an endohybrid approach using aorto-iliac

endografts, cross femoral bypass in some form of iliac embolization with an attempt to try to maintain flow to hypogastric arteries and maintain antegrade flow into that pelvic atypical renal artery, and a open hybrid approach where a renal artery can be transposed, and endografting a solution can be utilized.

The overall outcomes, fairly poor survival of these patients with a 50% survival at approximately two years, but there were no aortic related mortalities, all the renal artery reconstructions were patented last followup by Duplex or CT imaging. No aneurysms ruptures or aortic reinterventions or open

conversions were needed. So, focus specifically in a treatment algorithm, here in this complex group of patients, I think if the atypical renal artery comes off distal aorta, you have several treatment options. Most of these are going to be open, but if it is a small

accessory with multiple renal arteries, such as in certain cases of horseshoe kidneys, you may be able to get away with an endovascular approach with coverage of those small accessory arteries, an open hybrid approach which we utilized in a single case in the series with open transposition through a limited

incision from the distal aorta down to the distal iliac, and then actually a fenestrated endovascular repair of his complex aneurysm. Finally, an open approach, where direct aorto-ilio-femoral reconstruction with a bypass and reimplantation of that renal artery was done,

but in the patients with atypical renals off the iliac segment, I think you utilizing these endohybrid options can come up with some creative solutions, and utilize, if there is some common iliac occlusive disease or aneurysmal disease, you can maintain antegrade flow into these renal arteries from the pelvis

and utilize cross femoral bypass and contralateral occlusions. So, good options with AUIs, with an endohybrid approach in these difficult patients. Thank you.

- So I don't have to give you any data. I just have to tell you how we do it. So this is the easiest talk of this session. Step-by-step technical tips. Now our definition of pharmaco-mechanical may vary between us so I'll give that as we go along. These are my conflicts.

When to use it. Well certainly as you already heard, Massive PE has contraindication to full dose lytic is one area. Submassive elevated risk may be another. We've already seen multiple people put up

these guidelines so what we're really talking about at this point in time is those patients that we just talked, that those two groups that they just talked about because those are the ones that we're trying to treat. The biggest thing is don't be frozen by indecision.

Majority of patients eligible for thrombolysis do not receive it. It's amazing to me as a referral center to get the call from an outside community hospital or the patient with hypotension, abnormal RV or biomarkers and they've barely given the patient

Heparin and they just want to transfer the patient out of there and you tell them that's a massive PE. Please give them systemic thrombolysis and they go what? And I go you now have 10 times the death rate of an acute myocardial infarction. Would you give this patient lytics for acute MI?

Yes. Then give them the freaking lytics. Save their life. It's amazing what's going on in this country. So the PERT Consortium and everything, we really need to educate the community

because it's ridiculous. If you look at the utilization of thrombolysis, it's going down. Unbelievable and if you look at the in-hospital mortality for these patients that have significant PE, the in-hospital mortality is much higher

if you don't give thrombolysis. You've already seen this indirectly in a bunch of different lectures, but I just wanted to show you very quickly how to do this on an echo or CT. You want to get the center line, get it at the valve and then measure it one centimeter

below that valvular plane. This is something you don't have to depend on radiology just to do. You can just look at the transfer CT. You can look at the echo. You don't have to fight with your echo guy to give you that.

It's also very evident and often times just looking at the images. Why treat submassive elevated risk PE? You know what? I've heard all the mortality stuff. I get it.

It doesn't change mortality that much. It does and we should measure it as a primary endpoint in our trials. Change your discharge time and in this day and age, medicine is so expensive. Time in the hospital, repeat procedures,

elevated your amount of treatment for that patient really has to be looked at as part of that, not just mortality. But there's eight times more recurrent PE and four times a mortality rate if you have a PE and unresolved RV dysfunction at discharge

and that should be looked at prior to discharge, not just say well they look like they're doing okay. Treatment of IVC, higher risk PE. Certainly the other thing we have to look at is there's other things to do. You've already heard a little bit

that there's IVC filters out there. We take out 90 some percent of our IVC filters in our section. We actually as a system now are up to 60% at seven months and it only takes effort. The patients that I see die in our hospital

in the last year that shouldn't have died are patients that should've gotten an IVC filter because they got heroic things to take out their PE and nobody put a filter in even though they had significant DVT left over because they were afraid of the TV commercials?

Oh my gosh. If you look at the 27 extra deaths that we've had from IVC filters that were removable in the United States, and you take our experience and multiply it by the number of tertiary care hospitals in the United States, use them when they're appropriate.

Take them out so the risk is low, but don't go away from them. They've already been shown to be beneficial for the right patient population. But you also have embolectomy and surgery should also be considered.

Step by step. Make the decision and clinically be consistent. PERT team or other consistent mechanisms. We have an app that we use. This is throughout our entire healthcare system so all the vascular specialists have this.

It's an algorithm that's supposed to be used both in the ER and for the different vascular specialties so everybody's being treated very similarly. We have all the different definitions. We have the PESI calculator. All this is in an app

that's readily available to our constituents. Special consideration certainly is the tolerance of thrombolysis, underlying tolerance of pulmonary hypertension. Again, we need to evaluate the patient, not just label them as a PE.

And I also think there's a special population we need to study and that's the socked in pulmonary artery with no perfusion on a CT scan. I think this is a different population long term and we need to study that a little bit more. We got to get the patient back from the edge.

I think I'm opposite of Jeff. I don't want to see them get worse and then treat 'em. I want to prevent them from getting worse as long as I'm selecting that population in a thoughtful matter. We primarily use low dose TNK.

This is nothing I'm going to give you data on. This is an institutional, what do you want to call it, anecdotal experience and we lost our contracts except for TNK so we had to go to this and so we do a lot of catheter-directed. You've already seen all these trials.

There's a ton of different devices out there. The one I want to talk to you about is using a really fancy one called a pigtail catheter and another one called an ethos catheter. This is a patient that had a significant PE. You can see that they've got bilateral main PE.

This is on table. This is what we do for the vast majority of our patients. We sit there, we use ultrasound guided access to the vein so that we cut down our venous complications for access site. The patient is given 20 and 30% of a loading dose

of TNK and then we watch them. If you look at thrombus in a test tube and you give a thrombolytic therapy, it takes about 20 minutes for fibrinolysis. So this is what we do. As you're going to see, this is over 25 minutes

and we see the patient went from a pulmonary pressure of 65 and a heart rate of 115 down to 25 minutes, the patient's pulmonary pressure is about 44 and their heart rate is in the 90's. This patient then has all the catheters removed on the table even though they got lytic

and they're heparinized. This is a venipuncture, so big IV. We send them up to the unit and we typically discharge them the next day. We have an echo B4 discharge to make sure there's been a significant recovery of RV.

If not we'll watch them an extra day and then all these patients get a CT again. I'm sorry an echo again at 30 days to make sure that we're getting good resolution from that. On table results, decrease your complications. Thrombolysis has always been associated with the

duration of thrombolytic therapy and intracranial bleed. Now you can either use a pigtail catheter which is what we use for most of these people because we can measure pressure in it. We spin it around a little bit in the pulmonary arteries and give the dosage.

Again, we give 20-30% of the dose. There is no data for that. If significant improvement does not occur, they'll get dripped overnight in the ICU at usually .5 to 1 milligram per hour. You've already seen the data for EKOS.

We use this if we think we need a little bit quicker Thrombolysis such as in a socked in pulmonary artery 'cause we have no flow. We do think that may help, but we don't have any data for that. It makes us feel good.

We spend a lot more money and so we think that may be reasonable at that point in time. This is just what it looks like when you put in bilateral EKOS catheters. Certainly the patient can be put in the ICU for this. I do think that we should do a trial looking at EKOS

with a little higher dose, do it for 30 minutes, look at those pulmonary pressures right on the table. I think, again, my own opinion is after 25 years, the closer we get to being done on table, catheters out, patients doing well, the better, safer procedure we have,

the less chance of mortality, the less chance of complication and as you decrease complications, your benefit improves. We've already seen the results and you'll see more of these from non-randomized trials such as Seattle 2 which looked at 150 patients,

but they saw very quick recovery of the RV which was very important. If you look at technical success, it was very high. The dosage of thrombolytic exceedingly lower, lower than what we're giving in a PTO catheter, that's for sure.

And if you look at the RV from Ultima Trial which was randomized. There was faster RV recovery utilizing this device. Thank you very much.

- Thank you (mumbles) and thank you Dr. Veith for the kind invitation to participate in this amazing meeting. This is work from Hamburg mainly and we all know that TEVAR is the first endovascular treatment of choice but a third of our patients will fail to remodel and that's due to the consistent and persistent

flow in the false lumen over the re-entrance in the thoracoabdominal aorta. Therefore it makes sense to try to divide the compartments of the aorta and try to occlude flow in the false lumen and this can be tried by several means as coils, plug and glue

but also iliac occluders but they all have the disadvantage that they don't get over 24 mm which is usually not enough to occlude the false lumen. Therefore my colleague, Tilo Kolbel came up with this first idea with using

a pre-bulged stent graft at the midportion which after ballooning disrupts the dissection membrane and opposes the outer wall and therefore occludes backflow into the aneurysm sac in the thoracic segment, but the most convenient

and easy to use tool is the candy-plug which is a double tapered endograft with a midsegment that is 18 mm and once implanted in the false lumen at the level of the supraceliac aorta it occludes the backflow in the false lumen in the thoracic aorta

and we have seen very good remodeling with this approach. You see here a patient who completely regressed over three years and it also answers the question how it behaves with respect to true and false lumen. The true lumen always wins and because once

the false lumen thrombosis and the true lumen also has the arterial pressure it does prevail. These are the results from Hamburg with an experience of 33 patients and also the international experience with the CMD device that has been implanted in more than 20 cases worldwide

and we can see that the interprocedural technical success is extremely high, 100% with no irrelevant complications and also a complete false lumen that is very high, up to 95%. This is the evolvement of the candy-plug

over the years. It started as a surgeon modified graft just making a tie around one of the stents evolving to a CMD and then the last generation candy-plug II that came up 2017 and the difference, or the new aspect

of the candy-plug II is that it has a sleeve inside and therefore you can retrieve the dilator without having to put another central occluder or a plug in the central portion. Therefore when the dilator is outside of the sleeve the backflow occludes the sleeve

and you don't have to do anything else, but you have to be careful not to dislodge the whole stent graft while retrieving the dilator. This is a case of a patient with post (mumbles) dissection.

This is the technique of how we do it, access to the false lumen and deployment of the stent graft in the false lumen next to the true lumen stent graft being conscious of the fact that you don't go below the edge of the true lumen endograft

to avoid (mumbles) and the final angiography showing no backflow in the aneurysm. This is how we measure and it's quite simple. You just need about a centimeter in the supraceliac aorta where it's not massively dilated and then you just do an over-sizing

in the false lumen according to the Croissant technique as Ste-phan He-lo-sa has described by 10 to 30% and what is very important is that in these cases you don't burn any bridges. You can still have a good treatment

of the thoracic component and come back and do the fenestrated branch repair for the thoracoabdominal aorta if you have to. Thank you very much for your attention. (applause)

- Thank you very much. So this is more or less a teaser. The outcome data will not be presented until next month. It's undergoing final analysis. So, the Vici Stent was the stent in the VIRTUS Trial. Self-expanding, Nitinol stent,

12, 14, and 16 in diameter, in three different lengths, and that's what was in the trial. It is a closed-cell stent, despite the fact that it's closed-cell, the flexibility is not as compromised. The deployment can be done from the distal end

or the proximal end for those who have any interest, if you're coming from the jugular or not in the direction of flow, or for whatever reason you want to deploy it from this end versus that end, those are possible in terms of the system. The trial design is not that different than the other three

now the differences, there are minor differences between the four trials that three completed, one soon to be complete, the definitions of the endpoints in terms of patency and major adverse events were very similar. The trial design as we talked about, the only thing

that is different in this study were the imaging requirements. Every patient got a venogram, an IVUS, and duplex at the insertion and it was required at the completion in one year also, the endpoint was venographic, and those who actually did get venograms,

they had the IVUS as well, so this is the only prospective study that will have that correlation of three different imagings before, after, and at follow-up. Classification, everybody's aware, PTS severity, everybody's aware, the endpoints, again as we talked about, are very similar to the others.

The primary patency in 12 months was define this freedom from occlusion by thrombosis or re-intervention. And the safety endpoints, again, very similar to everybody else. The baseline patient characteristics, this is the pivotal, as per design, there were 170 in the pivotal

and 30 in the feasibility study. The final outcome will be all mixed in, obviously. And this is the distribution of the patients. The important thing here is the severity of patients in this study. By design, all acute thrombotic patients, acute DVT patients

were excluded, so anybody who had history of DVT within three months were excluded in this patient. Therefore the patients were all either post-thrombotic, meaning true chronic rather than putting the acute patients in the post-thrombotic segment. And only 25% were Neville's.

That becomes important, so if you look at the four studies instead of an overview of the four, there were differences in those in terms on inclusion/exclusion criteria, although definitions were similar, and the main difference was the inclusion of the chronics, mostly chronics, in the VIRTUS study, the others allowed acute inclusion also.

Now in terms of definition of primary patency and comparison to the historical controls, there were minor differences in these trials in terms of what that historical control meant. However, the differences were only a few percentages. I just want to remind everyone to something we've always known

that the chronic post-thrombotics or chronic occlusions really do the worst, as opposed to Neville's and the acute thrombotics and this study, 25% were here, 75% were down here, these patients were not allowed. So when the results are known, and out, and analyzed it's important not to put them in terms of percentage

for the entire cohort, all trials need to report all of these three categories separately. So in conclusion venous anatomy and disease requires obviously dedicated stent. The VIRTUS feasibility included 30 with 170 patients in the pivotal cohort, the 12 months data will be available

in about a month, thank you.

- Thank you, it's a pleasure to be here. I'll address how the Indigo Thrombectomy technology can expand the reach of what you can do for your patients. It will preserve treatment options, improve patient outcomes, conserve hospital resources,

and perhaps most importantly, improve your day. The old treatment strategy, every time I had someone with acute limb ischemia I felt like I was shopping at this store. When I went to surgery, I wished I could put a drip catheter in, it lasts a little longer,

to mop up some di when I went to the angio suite, I wished I could cut down and remove some more macroscopic debris. I submit that the new Indigo technology

will provide a new strategy for treating acute arterial ischemia. On the same concepts are predicated STEMI, code stroke, Level I trauma alerts, we've instituted acute aorta, and piggybacked on that, an acute arterial ischemia protocol.

So that means when a patient like this presents with acute arterial ischemia, they get an algorithmic, systemic, trained, metered approach. They go past the holding room directly to the endovascular suite,

and all the processes happen in parallel, not in series. The call team is trained and dedicated, and while anesthesia is working up top with labs and lines, we use the duplex ultrasound to pick carefully our access sites. A faster time to reperfusion allows us to

do it and avoid general anesthesia, incision in hostile groins, and the exposure of lytic therapy, resulting in a decreased morbidity and mortality. Being able to treat the full spectrum of the arterial tree allows us to run options.

We preserve options by first mopping up more proximal clot, and then dripping distally when we need to, or, dripping distally to open up distal targets for surgical bypasses. As an example, this was a recent case

on a trauma CT scan, injured inthrelane aorta with emblogenic thrombus confirmed on intravascular ultrasound. We went in with a large bore system, a cath to aspirate the clot, and then used a cover stent to repair the aorta.

We shot an arteriogram the lower extremities, noticed that it embolized distally, and we used a Cat 6 to pluck out this clot and restore flow. Able to work up and down the full arterial tree. A learning curve for me was to understand that debris has to be corked to removal, which means no flow.

And most other worlds in vascular surgery, flow is good. No flow is bad. Also, you have to vacuum the clot out. Which means you have to uncross the lesion, which is counter intuitive for most of the precepts I've learned.

I've learned to use long sheaths to approach the lesion and to use larger catheters to remove more macroscopic debris. I rarely use the separator, I engage it and cork it for 90 seconds. That allows it to get a firm grip and purchase on it.

And I have to remember that no flow is good. This demonstrates how you approach the catheter with a large sheath. Under roadmap guidance you turn the aspiration vacuum on immediately before you cork it to minimize blood loss. And you use it like a vacuum by uncrossing the lesion

and let it slowly engage and aspirate the catheter. Ninety seconds allows it to get a firm grip and purchase so you can extract it without breaking it loose. I rarely use a separator, I use it only for large thrombus burdens, sub-acute clot, adherent debris,

or when the Indigo catheter is clogged. I strip out the catheter with the separator like a pipe cleaner, and then, every once in a while, on a subacute clot, I'll peck and morcellate it with a separator. Typically, in my lab, when I have new technology

I never have the team trained when I have just the right case, so I've learned over time, to train the team first. And with a trained team, they've taught me a lot. I've found with the Indigo catheter it's hard for me to watch the monitor,

work the catheter, handle the on-off switch, and watch the flow in the canister. So, what we do is we have a spotter who's not scrubbed. They taught me to take the on-off switch out, and then mechanically kink the tubing to make and on-off switch.

And they provide me feedback and just say fast, slow, or corked, so I can run the catheter and watch the monitor. I've learned to beware of the Cook Flexor sheaths, because they scuff up the tip. Use a check flow valve that unscrews from the

catheter if possible. I use coaxial catheters whenever possible, and I telescope them. You can telescope large catheters over small catheters. I use large sheaths and catheters whenever possible, using the preclose technique,

and then you can preserve options if you want to press more distally, you can cinch down, remove the large sheath, put in a 4 5 French, and then press ahead. I also, after I use a pulse technique, will occasionally use the Jungle Juice.

The team taught me the Jungle Juice is half strength contrast, some TPA and some nitroglycerine. When I lace the clot with Jungle Juice, I can observe fluoroscopically, the progress I'm making as I'm aspirating the clot. Thank you.

- Good morning, thank you Frank and the entire meeting for the invite. These are my disclosures. I'll be discussing off label use of devices. Clearly significant challenges in the aortic arch. The morbidity of open repairs as eluded to in the previous speakers.

Typically high medical risk patients, urgent/emergent presentations, varied aortic pathologies, lack in this country of any branched or fenestrated off the shelf options. So, can potentially parallel/antegrade chimney options, mitigate some of the risk associated with TEVAR

for maintaining flow to the arch branches. Limited experiences have been reported. Ive' chosen to pool a recent UF experience with a personal consecutive series to get a pretty large number of patients to try and drill down on some of the details here.

This is kind of a general technical details, clearly evolved a little bit over time. And, my technique's a little bit different from the UF experience. I published this, it's a concomitant placement of the TEVAR device,

the ascending branch chimney grafts via retro grade open approaches, rapid ventricular pacing or atrial balloon. And my preference is larger doses of adenosine to produce a stasis in the ascending aorta and the arch through, for period of 15 seconds

to a minute or so. Then TEVAR deployment with subsequent chimney expansions, then kissing balloons techniques. I prefer a tri-lobe balloon over any of the singular compliant balloons. In this pooled cohort, there's 44 patients:

30 males, 15 females. All at prohibitive risk for repair. Half of these patients have prior aortic interventions. A third of these cases being urgent/emergent, requiring just use of devices off the shelf. Varied aortic pathologies roughly 2/3 aneurismal pathologies

and 1/3 dissections, most of those being chronic with a secondary aneurysmal growths. The approximal TEVAR landing zones were predominantly in zone one, with a quarter of the cases being in zone zero. With regards to the specific aortic arch branch management,

left subclavian revascularization with approximal exclusion, was done in 80% of patients and more commonly now probably approaching 90 plus percent of this longer series back to the early 2000's. There was unplanned arch chimney endoprostheses placement in 20% of the cases.

Most of those in the earlier experience were unintended coverage of the left common carotid artery, required the endograft. Now this can be planned a little more carefully, I think with CT imaging. Most of these cases were single vessel chimneys

with a smaller number of dual arch chimneys, both the anemone and left common carotid. Here are the outcomes. I think these are respectable and favorable. A 4.5% early mortality, both emergent cases with ruptured aneurysms.

No spinal cord ischemia. The three strokes occurring in the series were in cases with unplanned arch chimney placements. So, three of those nine unplanned chimneys, down the left common carotid artery were associated with some malperfusion to the brain.

They were non-disabling strokes. Patients did recover. Follow-up here is an average of a year. The arch chimneys remained all patent with three re interventions for self expanding endografts

requiring bare stent placements inside them for stent compression. No late ruptures. 18% re-intervention for the chimney or the aortic grafts was common. As well as, a quarter of patients

requiring subsequent distal or proximal aortic repairs for additional metachronous pathology. A couple final learning points, gutter leaks infrequent but occurred, associated with the chronic type B dissections. One of those treated endovascularly here

where the cul-de-sac of the subclavian stump was fairly large and I had to re-coil this to ameliorate that leak. An open conversion in one case, the rest of those being observed. Three late conversions in the series.

Finally, in conclusion, these are relatively safe outcomes for TEVAR and arch chimney with the left subclavian revascularization. We would prefer two to three centimeter parallel to the aortic device placement of these chimneys with balloon expandable endografts,

being preferred with eye casts currently. A less optimal outcomes for chronic type B dissections for a variety of reasons. These remain difficult anatomies to treat. Thanks.

- Thank you very much for the kind introduction, and I'd like to thank the organizers, especially Frank Veith for getting back to this outstanding and very important conference. My duty is now to talk about the acute status of carotid artery stenting is acute occlusion an issue? Here are my disclosures.

Probably you might be aware, for sure you're aware about pore size and probably smaller pore size, the small material load might be a predisposing factor for enhanced thrombogenicity in these dual layer stents, as you're probably quite familiar with the CGUARD, Roadsaver and GORE, I will focus my talk a little bit

on the Roadsaver stent, since I have the most experience with the Roadsaver stent from the early beginning when this device was on the market in Europe. If you go back a little bit and look at the early publications of CGUARD, Roadsaver and GORE stent, then acute occlusion the early reports show that

very clearly safety, especially at 30 days in terms of major cardiac and cerebrovascular events. They are very, very safe, 0% in all these early publications deal with these stents. But you're probably aware of this publication, released end of last year, where a German group in Hamburg

deals with carotid artery stenosis during acute stroke treatment. They used the dual layer stent, the Roadsaver stent or the Casper stent in 20 cases, in the same time period from 2011 to 2016, they used also the Wallstent and the VIVEXX stent,

in 27 cases in total and there was a major difference, in terms of acute stent occlusion, and for the Roadsaver or Casper stent, it was 45%, they also had an explanation for that, potential explanations probably due to the increase of thrombogenic material due to the dual layer

insufficient preparation with antiplatelet medication, higher patient counts in the patients who occluded, smaller stent diameters, and the patients were not administered PTA, meaning Bridging during acute stroke patient treatment, but it was highlighted that all patients received ASA of 500mg intravenously

during the procedure. But there are some questions coming up. What is a small stent diameter? Post-dilatation at what diameter, once the stent was implanted? What about wall apposition of the stent?

Correct stent deployment with the Vicis maneuver performed or not and was the ACT adjusted during the procedure, meaning did they perform an adequate heparinization? These are open questions and I would like to share our experience from Flensburg,

so we have treated nearly 200 patients with the Roadsaver stent from 2015 until now. In 42 patients, we used this stent exclusively for acute stroke treatment and never, ever observed in both groups, in the symptomatic and asymptomatic group and in the group of acute stroke treatment,

we never observed an acute occlusion. How can we explain this kind of difference that neither acute occlusion occurred in our patient group? Probably there are some options how we can avoid stent thrombosis, how we can minimize this. For emergency treatment, probably this might be related

to bridging therapies, though in Germany a lot of patients who received acute stroke treatment are on bridging therapy since the way to the hospital is sometimes rather long, there probably might be a predisposing factor to re-avoid stent thrombosis and so-called tandem lesions if the stent placement is needed.

But we also take care of antiplatelet medication peri-procedurally, and we do this with ASA, as the Hamburg group did and at one day, we always start, in all emergency patients with clopidogrel loading dose after positive CT where we could exclude any bleeding and post-procedurally we go

for dual anti-platelet therapy for at least six months, meaning clopidogrel and ASA, and this is something probably of utmost importance. It's quite the same for elective patients, I think you're quite familiar with this, and I want to highlight the post-procedural clopidogrel

might be the key of success for six months combined with ASA life-long. Stent preparation is also an issue, at least 7 or 8 diameters we have to choose for the correct lengths we have to perform adequate stent deployment and adequate post-dilatation

for at least 5mm. In a lot of trials the Roadsaver concept has been proven, and this is due to the adequate preparation of the stent and ongoing platelet preparation, and this was also highlight in the meta-analysis with the death and stroke rate of .02% in all cases.

Roadsaver study is performed now planned, I am a member of the steering committee. In 2000 patients, so far 132 patients have been included and I want to rise up once again the question, is acute occlusion and issue? No, I don't think so, since you keep antiplatelet medication

in mind and be aware of adequate stent sizing. I highly appreciated your attention, thank you very much.

- Thank you, good morning, no disclosures. Well, we all know that TEVAR can be deceptively complex. We have access issues, we have landing zones to contend with, the subclavian, sometimes visceral debranching. Of course we have new devices with branches, but these are still concerns.

We're always worried about stroke with arch embolization, length of coverage leading to paraplegia, and the ARCH dynamics, as shown here, can be almost violent, and I think all impact on sizing for these cases. Before we talk about sizing, we have to ask ourselves what our goals are.

What is the desired outcome? For aneurysms, we clearly want to exclude the flow to the aneurysm sac, to prevent endoleak and migration. Generally, we want to work on fixation and seal, and this requires a 10-20% oversize. We oftentimes balloon routinely.

In contrary, for dissection or transection, we just simply want to cover the intimal tear. We want to rescaffold the aorta, and this only requires at times 5 or 10% oversizing, and of course we don't want to balloon these acute settings. Success is really dependent on accurate sizing.

We don't want to rely on axial imaging. We want centerline imaging from good 3D software. Length is more variable, we're not going to talk too much about length, but suffice to say that sometimes centerlines are not always accurate and we have to recognize that.

3D imaging is critical, and whether you use the Terarecon, the OsiriX, the Preview, it doesn't matter, you just need familiarity with one of these. And as we can see, based on different pathologies, anatomy can be quite different. In the trauma patient shown on the left,

you can see a very small aorta with a tight arch, whereas the more diseased, older patient with aneurysmal disease on the right is quite different. In this nice paper, Dr. Jordan and his colleagues shown here really outline this very nicely, and show different trauma. The trauma group and the aneurysm group,

quite different anatomy, tighter arches, smaller aortas, more tapering in the trauma patient. All things we have to recognize when we try to size these cases. Again, going back to aneurysms, there's a 10-20% oversizing. These are older patients with more rigid aortas,

larger diameters, increased arch radius, and less healthy aortas. We want to avoid bird-beaking, we want to commit to the arch, and sometimes we can do more exaggerated oversizing when we have tortuosity and we're not going to land orthogonally. Looking at these two, this case up on the right, you can see

the seal zone may actually be along the greater curvature, and so that's also important to recognize when we size cases. Shifting to the trauma patient, the blunt aortic injury shown here, these are different anatomies, they're younger patients,

as we mentioned, smaller aortas with tighter arches. We have to recognize these patients may be severely hypovolemic and volume-contracted, and sometimes diameter can be underestimated by as much as 5-40%. We want to avoid oversizing for a number of reasons.

We don't want to have device collapse or compression, which can occur, and we've all seen pictures of these cases, and these are more common in those patients with small lumens. For this reason, IVUS I think can hold special utility. It's an interoperative modality which can give time

for the patient to be resuscitated, and the diameter of the aorta may become more accurately enlarged. It does tend to undersize, though. Dissection, similar to transection. We don't want to oversize more than 5-10%. IVUS can also help here in visualizing the tear.

We will have to recognize there's some distalate tapering of the lumen. What's our dreaded complication? Well, it's the type retrograde dissection, as shown here. And this is, again, based on pathology. This is why we don't want to oversize more than 5-10%,

and this nice paper out of the Mother Registry, Matt Thompson and his group, shows that for every 1% oversize above 9% and we have an increased risk of retrograde dissection. And this group shows that perhaps even 10% is too much. 5% shows, in this group, when you oversize more than 5%,

that's when you lead to this retrograde dissection complication shown here. So, what about the arch makes it so difficult? I think that we have to recognize these devices we're implanting have a springlike component to them, and they want to straighten out.

We have to choose devices that are conformable and will work in the arch, and for this reason, we want to avoid this stent-induced new entry. This paper here talks about risk factors for stent-induced new entry, and you see then that the connecting bar or the shorter stents are the ones

that tend to induce this stent-induced new entry phenomenon. Interestingly, there is no increased significant difference between the proximal bare stent and the non-proximal bare stent groups, but the greater oversizing did in fact lead to this complication.

Currently, we have these available devices for us to use, different range of diameters and tapering, but all of them are common in that they're nitinol stents, and of course, as we compress a nitinol stent more, we're going to have more of that spring effect, and more radial force with oversizing.

And you can see here, a nice chart showing that for one 29 mm aorta, we have three choices available to us: a 31, a 34, a 37. They would all work, and we have to recognize the anatomy we're treating. The aneurysm in tortuous anatomy,

we may want to oversize more aggressively, whereas a straight anatomy might be a 34 in this case, and of course the trauma or dissection patient, we want to be very careful and perhaps choose a 31. So in conclusion, TEVAR has now become the treatment of choice for a variety of different pathologies.

Accurate sizing with appropriate imaging is critical for a thorough understanding of different pathologies as well as what our goals are for repair is equally important, when we want to achieve success, thank you.

- Thank you very much for the privilege of participating in this iconic symposium. I have no disclosures pertinent to this presentation. The Atelier percutaneous endovascular repair for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms is a natural evolution of procedural technique due to the success of fully percutaneous endovascular

aortic aneurysm repair in elective cases. This past year, we had the opportunity to publish our data with regard to 30 day outcomes between percutaneous ruptured aneurysm repairs and surgical cutdown repairs utilizing the American College of Surgeons NSQIP database,

which is a targeted database which enrolls about 800 hospitals in the United States, looking at both the univariate and multivariate analyses comparing preoperative demographics, operative-specific variables and postoperative outcomes. There were 502 patients who underwent

ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms that were included in this review, 129 that underwent percutaneous repair, whereas 373 underwent cutdown repair. As you can see, the majority were still being done by cutdown.

Over the four years, however, there was a gradual increase in the number of patients that were having percutaneous repair used as their primary modality of access, and in fact a more recent stasis has shown to increase up to 50%,

and there certainly was a learning curve during this period of time. Looking at the baseline characteristics of patients with ruptured aneurysms undergoing both modalities, there was not statistically significant difference

with regard to these baseline characteristics. Likewise, with size of the aneurysms, both were of equal sizes. There was no differences with regard to rupture having hypotension, proximal or distal extension of the aneurysms.

What is interesting, however, that the patients that underwent percutaneous repair tended to have regional anesthesia as their anesthesia of choice, rather than that of having a general. Also there was for some unexplained reason

a more significant conversion to open procedures in the percutaneous group as compared to the cutdown group. Looking at adjusted 30-day outcomes for ruptured endovascular aneurysm repairs, when looking at the 30-day mortality,

the operative time, wound complications, hospital length of stay, that was not statistically significant. However, over that four year period of time, there tended to be decreased hospital length of stay as well as decreased wound complications

over four years. So the summary of this study shows that there was an increased use of fully percutaneous access for endovascular repairs for ruptured aneurysms with noninferiority compared to traditional open femoral cutdown approaches.

There is a trending advantage over conventional surgical exposure with decreased access-related complications, as well as decreased hospital length of stay. Now, I'm going to go through some of the technical tips, and this is really going to be focused upon

the trainees in the room, and also perhaps those clinicians who do not do percutaneous access at this time. What's important, I find, is that the utility of duplex ultrasonography, and this is critical to delineate the common

femoral artery access anatomy. And what's important to find is the common femoral artery between the inguinal ligament and this bifurcation to the profunda femoral and superficial femoral arteries. So this is your target area. Once this target area is found,

especially in those patients presenting with ruptured aneurysm, local anesthesia is preferred over general anesthesia with permissive hypotension. This is a critical point that once you use ultrasound, that you'd want to orient your probe to be

90 degrees to the target area and measure the distance between the skin and the top of that artery. Now if you hold that needle at equidistance to that same distance between the skin and the artery and angle that needle at 45 degrees,

this will then allow you to have the proper trajectory to hit the target absolutely where you're imaging the vessel, and this becomes important so you're not off site. Once micropuncture technique is used, it's always a good idea just to use

a quick fluoroscopic imaging to show that your access is actually where you want it to be. If it's not, you can always re-stick the patient again. Once you have the access in place, what can then happen is do a quick angio to show in fact you have reached the target vessel.

This is the routine instructions for use by placing the percutaneous suture-mediated closure system at 45 degree angles from one another, 90 degrees from one another. Once the sheath is in place for ruptured aneurysm, the placement of a ballon occlusion

can be done utilizing a long, at least 12 French sheath so that they'll keep that balloon up in place. What's also good is to keep a neat operative field, and by doing so, you can keep all of these wires and sutures clean and out of the way and also color code the sutures so that you have

ease and ability to close them later. Finally, it's important to replace the dilator back in the sheath prior to having it removed. This is important just so that if there are problems with your percutaneous closure, you can always very quickly replace your sheath back in.

Again, we tend to color code the sutures so we can know which ones go with which. You can also place yet a third percutaneous access closure device if need be by keeping the guide wire in place. One other little trick that I actually learned

from Ben Starnes when visiting his facility is to utilize a Rumel mediated technique by placing a short piece of IV tubing cut length, running the suture through that, and using it like a Rumel, and that frees up your hand as you're closing up

the other side and final with closure. The contraindications to pREVAR. And I just want to conclude that there's increased use of fully percutaneous access for endovascular repair. There's trending advantages over conventional surgical exposure with decreased

access related complications, and improved outcomes can be attributed to increased user experience and comfort with percutaneous access, and this appears to be a viable first option. Thank you very much.

- I'm going to take it slightly beyond the standard role for the VBX and use it as we use it now for our fenestrated and branch and chimney grafts. These are my disclosures. You've seen these slides already, but the flexibility of VBX really does give us a significant ability to conform it

to the anatomies that we're dealing with. It's a very trackable stent. It doesn't, you don't have to worry about it coming off the balloon. Flexible as individual stents and in case in a PTFE so you can see it really articulates

between each of these rings of PTFE, or rings of stent and not connected together. I found I can use the smaller grafts, the six millimeter, for parallel grafts then flare them distally into my landing zone to customize it but keep the gutter relatively small

and decrease the instance of gutter leaks. So let's start with a presentation. I know we just had lunch so try and shake it up a little bit here. 72-year-old male that came in, history of a previous end-to-side aortobifemoral bypass graft

and then came in, had bilateral occluded external iliac arteries. I assume that's for the end-to-side anastomosis. I had a history of COPD, coronary artery disease, and peripheral arterial disease, and presented with a pseudoaneurysm

in the proximal juxtarenal graft anastomosis. Here you can see coming down the thing of most concern is both iliacs are occluded, slight kink in the aortofemoral bypass graft, but you see a common iliac coming down to the hypogastric, and that's really the only blood flow to the pelvis.

The aneurysm itself actually extended close to the renal, so we felt we needed to do a fenestrated graft. We came in with a fenestrated graft. Here's the renal vessels here, SMA. And then we actually came in from above in the brachial access and catheterized

the common iliac artery going down through the stenosis into the hypogastric artery. With that we then put a VBX stent graft in there which nicely deployed that, and you can see how we can customize the stent starting with a smaller stent here

and then flaring it more proximal as we move up through the vessel. With that we then came in and did our fenestrated graft. You can see fenestrations. We do use VBX for a good number of our fenestrated grafts and here you can see the tailoring.

You can see where a smaller artery, able to flare it at the level of the fenestration flare more for a good seal. Within the fenestration itself excellent flow to the left. We repeated the procedure on the right. Again, more customizable at the fenestration and going out to the smaller vessel.

And then we came down and actually extended down in a parallel graft down into that VBX to give us that parallel graft perfusion of the pelvis, and thereby we sealed the pseudoaneurysm and maintain tail perfusion of the pelvis and then through the aortofemoral limbs

to both of the common femoral arteries, and that resolved the pseudoaneurysm and maintained perfusion for us. We did a retrospective review of our data from August of 2014 through March of 2018. We had 183 patients who underwent endovascular repair

for a complex aneurysm, 106 which had branch grafts to the renals and the visceral vessels for 238 grafts. When we look at the breakdown here, of those 106, 38 patients' stents involved the use of VBX. This was only limited by the late release of the VBX graft.

And so we had 68 patients who were treated with non-VBX grafts. Their other demographics were very similar. We then look at the use, we were able to use some of the smaller VBXs, as I mentioned, because we can tailor it more distally

so you don't have to put a seven or eight millimeter parallel graft in, and with that we found that we had excellent results with that. Lower use of actual number of grafts, so we had, for VBX side we only had one graft

per vessel treated. If you look at the other grafts, they're anywhere between 1.2 and two grafts per vessel treated. We had similar mortality and followup was good with excellent graft patency for the VBX grafts.

As mentioned, technical success of 99%, mimicking the data that Dr. Metzger put forward to us. So in conclusion, I think VBX is a safe and a very versatile graft we can use for treating these complex aneurysms for perfusion of iliac vessels as well as visceral vessels

as we illustrated. And we use it for aortoiliac occlusive disease, branch and fenestrated grafts and parallel grafts. It's patency is equal to if not better than the similar grafts and has a greater flexibility for modeling and conforming to the existing anatomy.

Thank you very much for your attention.

Thank you, Mr Chairman. In order to avoid unnecessary repetition, I'm going to try to move forward with some of my slides. There we go. And, again, in order to avoid that, we're just going to move through the cases. I have some cases that are different

to the ones presented before. It seems that everybody's happy with this technology. This is a CTO recanalization of a patient with subacute total occulsion of the SFA that previously had a stent in place,

in the distal SFA. And here you can see how we are able to reopen the vessel and look at the clot in the entire length at the end of the catheter there. So, this technology really works.

Let me show you now an acute bowel ischemia case. A patient that comes with abdominal pain. A CTA shows that the patient has an occlusion of the proximal SMA. We put a catheter there,

we do a diagnostic angiogram confirming the occlusion, then we cross the lesion and we inject distali showing that the branches are patent. And then we put in place

an oscar directional sheath that will give us great stability to work and through that one we use a Cat Eight, from Penumbra. As you can see here, advancing the catheter in combination with the separator,

and this is the final angiogram showing complete opening of the main SMA and you can see very clearly the elements that were occluding the MSL. We are also using this technology in DVT, acute DVT, with proprietal access

and here you can see the before, and then, sometimes we use it alone, sometimes we use it in combination with angiojet and with the bull spray, followed by this technology for the areas that did not respond.

But this is usually a technology that is helping us to get rid of most of the clot. Like here, you see there is some residual clot. And after Penambra, you can direct the catheter and you can really clean the entire vein. Same here, before and after.

We are also using it for PE. I know that you guys in Miami are doing the same and we are happy with the results. And then, just to finish, I think this is a really nice case that was done by one of our partners in vascular surgery.

A patient with an occluded carotid subclavial bypass. So you see access from the brachial artery on one side. And this person, the person who did this, was smart enough to also came from the groin

and put the filter in the internal carotid artery, just in case. So then he starts to manipulate that occluded subclavial carotid bypass. As you can see here. And at a certain point,

he does a follow-up angiogram showing that the entire carotid, including the internal and external, is totally occluded. So, because he was prepared, he had a filter,

he didn't panic, he went and used the indigo device, and he was able to get all that clot out and re-establish nice anterial flowing in the carotid artery,

completely clean. The carotid subclavial bypass. And he did a final angiogram in AP and lateral view, confirming that there is no distimbolisation at the intercranial level. So, this technology really works.

I think that we all agree. And these are good examples on how we can help patients with that technology. Thank you for your attention.

- So Beyond Vascular procedures, I guess we've conquered all the vascular procedures, now we're going to conquer the world, so let me take a little bit of time to say that these are my conflicts, while doing that, I think it's important that we encourage people to access the hybrid rooms,

It's much more important that the tar-verse done in the Hybrid Room, rather than moving on to the CAT labs, so we have some idea basically of what's going on. That certainly compresses the Hybrid Room availability, but you can't argue for more resources

if the Hybrid Room is running half-empty for example, the only way you get it is by opening this up and so things like laser lead extractions or tar-verse are predominantly still done basically in our hybrid rooms, and we try to make access for them. I don't need to go through this,

you've now think that Doctor Shirttail made a convincing argument for 3D imaging and 3D acquisition. I think the fundamental next revolution in surgery, Every subspecialty is the availability of 3D imaging in the operating room.

We have lead the way in that in vascular surgery, but you think how this could revolutionize urology, general surgery, neurosurgery, and so I think it's very important that we battle for imaging control. Don't give your administration the idea that

you're going to settle for a C-arm, that's the beginning of the end if you do that, this okay to augment use C-arms to augment your practice, but if you're a finishing fellow, you make sure you go to a place that's going to give you access to full hybrid room,

otherwise, you are the subservient imagers compared to radiologists and cardiologists. We need that access to this high quality room. And the new buzzword you're going to hear about is Multi Modality Imaging Suites, this combination of imaging suites that are

being put together, top left deserves with MR, we think MR is the cardiovascular imaging modality of the future, there's a whole group at NIH working at MR Guided Interventions which we're interested in, and the bottom right is the CT-scan in a hybrid op

in a hybrid room, this is actually from MD Anderson. And I think this is actually the Trauma Room of the future, makes no sense to me to take a patient from an emergency room to a CT scanner to an and-jure suite to an operator it's the most dangerous thing we do

with a trauma patient and I think this is actually a position statement from the Trauma Society we're involved in, talk about how important it is to co-localize this imaging, and I think the trauma room of the future is going to be an and-jure suite

down with a CT scanner built into it, and you need to be flexible. Now, the Empire Strikes Back in terms of cloud-based fusion in that Siemans actually just released a portable C-arm that does cone-beam CT. C-arm's basically a rapidly improving,

and I think a lot of these things are going to be available to you at reduced cost. So let me move on and basically just show a couple of examples. What you learn are techniques, then what you do is look for applications to apply this, and so we've been doing

translumbar embolization using fusion and imaging guidance, and this is a case of one of my partners, he'd done an ascending repair, and the patient came back three weeks later and said he had sudden-onset chest pain and the CT-scan showed that there was a

sutured line dehiscence which is a little alarming. I tried to embolize that endovascular, could not get to that tiny little orifice, and so we decided to watch it, it got worse, and bigger, over the course of a week, so clearly we had to go ahead and basically and fix this,

and we opted to use this, using a new guidance system and going directly parasternal. You can do fusion of blood vessels or bones, you can do it off anything you can see on flu-roid, here we actually fused off the sternal wires and this allows you to see if there's

respiratory motion, you can measure in the workstation the depth really to the target was almost four and a half centimeters straight back from the second sternal wire and that allowed us really using this image guidance system when you set up what's called the bullseye view,

you look straight down the barrel of a needle, and then the laser turns on and the undersurface of the hybrid room shows you where to stick the needle. This is something that we'd refined from doing localization of lung nodules

and I'll show you that next. And so this is the system using the C-star, we use the breast, and the localization needle, and we can actually basically advance that straight into that cavity, and you can see once you get in it,

we confirmed it by injecting into it, you can see the pseudo-aneurism, you can see the immediate stain of hematoma and then we simply embolize that directly. This is probably safer than going endovascular because that little neck protects about

the embolization from actually taking place, and you can see what the complete snan-ja-gram actually looked like, we had a pig tail in the aura so we could co-linearly check what was going on and we used docto-gramming make sure we don't have embolization.

This patient now basically about three months follow-up and this is a nice way to completely dissolve by avoiding really doing this. Let me give you another example, this actually one came from our transplant surgeon he wanted to put in a vas,

he said this patient is really sick, so well, by definition they're usually pretty sick, they say we need to make a small incision and target this and so what we did was we scanned the vas, that's the hardware device you're looking at here. These have to be

oriented with the inlet nozzle looking directly into the orifice of the mitro wall, and so we scanned the heart with, what you see is what you get with these devices, they're not deformed, we take a cell phone and implant it in your chest,

still going to look like a cell phone. And so what we did, image fusion was then used with two completely different data sets, it mimicking the procedure, and we lined this up basically with a mitro valve, we then used that same imaging guidance system

I was showing you, made a little incision really doing onto the apex of the heart, and to the eur-aph for the return cannula, and this is basically what it looked like, and you can actually check the efficacy of this by scanning the patient post operatively

and see whether or not you executed on this basically the same way, and so this was all basically developed basing off Lung Nodule Localization Techniques with that we've kind of fairly extensively published, use with men can base one of our thoracic surgeons

so I'd encourage you to look at other opportunities by which you can help other specialties, 'cause I think this 3D imaging is going to transform what our capabilities actually are. Thank you very much indeed for your attention.

- These are my disclosures. So central venous access is frequently employed throughout the world for a variety of purposes. These catheters range anywhere between seven and 11 French sheaths. And it's recognized, even in the best case scenario, that there are iatrogenic arterial injuries

that can occur, ranging between three to 5%. And even a smaller proportion of patients will present after complications from access with either a pseudoaneurysm, fistula formation, dissection, or distal embolization. In thinking about these, as you see these as consultations

on your service, our thoughts are to think about it in four primary things. Number one is the anatomic location, and I think imaging is very helpful. This is a vas cath in the carotid artery. The second is th

how long the device has been dwelling in the carotid or the subclavian circulation. Assessment for thrombus around the catheter, and then obviously the size of the hole and the size of the catheter.

Several years ago we undertook a retrospective review and looked at this, and we looked at all carotid, subclavian, and innominate iatrogenic injuries, and we excluded all the injuries that were treated, that were manifest early and treated with just manual compression.

It's a small cohort of patients, we had 12 cases. Eight were treated with a variety of endovascular techniques and four were treated with open surgery. So, to illustrate our approach, I thought what I would do is just show you four cases on how we treated some of these types of problems.

The first one is a 75 year-old gentleman who's three days status post a coronary bypass graft with a LIMA graft to his LAD. He had a cordis catheter in his chest on the left side, which was discovered to be in the left subclavian artery as opposed to the vein.

So this nine French sheath, this is the imaging showing where the entry site is, just underneath the clavicle. You can see the vertebral and the IMA are both patent. And this is an angiogram from a catheter with which was placed in the femoral artery at the time that we were going to take care of this

with a four French catheter. For this case, we had duel access, so we had access from the groin with a sheath and a wire in place in case we needed to treat this from below. Then from above, we rewired the cordis catheter,

placed a suture-mediated closure device, sutured it down, left the wire in place, and shot this angiogram, which you can see very clearly has now taken care of the bleeding site. There's some pinching here after the wire was removed,

this abated without any difficulty. Second case is a 26 year-old woman with a diagnosis of vascular EDS. She presented to the operating room for a small bowel obstruction. Anesthesia has tried to attempt to put a central venous

catheter access in there. There unfortunately was an injury to the right subclavian vein. After she recovered from her operation, on cross sectional imaging you can see that she has this large pseudoaneurysm

coming from the subclavian artery on this axial cut and also on the sagittal view. Because she's a vascular EDS patient, we did this open brachial approach. We placed a stent graft across the area of injury to exclude the aneurism.

And you can see that there's still some filling in this region here. And it appeared to be coming from the internal mammary artery. We gave her a few days, it still was patent. Cross-sectional imaging confirmed this,

and so this was eventually treated with thoracoscopic clipping and resolved flow into the aneurism. The next case is a little bit more complicated. This is an 80 year-old woman with polycythemia vera who had a plasmapheresis catheter,

nine French sheath placed on the left subclavian artery which was diagnosed five days post procedure when she presented with a posterior circulation stroke. As you can see on the imaging, her vertebral's open, her mammary's open, she has this catheter in the significant clot

in this region. To manage this, again, we did duel access. So right femoral approach, left brachial approach. We placed the filter element in the vertebral artery. Balloon occlusion of the subclavian, and then a stent graft coverage of the area

and took the plasmapheresis catheter out and then suction embolectomy. And then the last case is a 47 year-old woman who had an attempted right subclavian vein access and it was known that she had a pulsatile mass in the supraclavicular fossa.

Was noted to have a 3cm subclavian artery pseudoaneurysm. Very broad base, short neck, and we elected to treat this with open surgical technique. So I think as you see these consults, the things to factor in to your management decision are: number one, the location.

Number two, the complication of whether it's thrombus, pseudoaneurysm, or fistula. It's very important to identify whether there is pericatheter thrombus. There's a variety of techniques available for treatment, ranging from manual compression,

endovascular techniques, and open repair. I think the primary point here is the prevention with ultrasound guidance is very important when placing these catheters. Thank you. (clapping)

- Relevant disclosures are shown in this slide. So when we treat patients with Multi-Segment Disease, the more segments that are involved, the more complex the outcomes that we should expect, with regards to the patient comorbidities and the complexity of the operation. And this is made even more complex

when we add aortic dissection to the patient population. We know that a large proportion of patients who undergo Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair, require planned coverage of the left subclavian artery. And this also been demonstrated that it's an increase risk for stroke, spinal cord ischemia and other complications.

What are the options when we have to cover the left subclavian artery? Well we can just cover the artery, we no that. That's commonly performed in emergency situations. The current standard is to bypass or transpose the artery. Or provide a totally endovascular revascularization option

with some off-label use , such as In Situ or In Vitro Fenestration, Parallel Grafting or hopefully soon we will see and will have available branched graft devices. These devices are currently investigational and the focus today's talk will be this one,

the Valiant Mona Lisa Stent Graft System. Currently the main body device is available in diameters between thirty and forty-six millimeters and they are all fifteen centimeters long. The device is designed with flexible cuff, which mimics what we call the "volcano" on the main body.

It's a pivotal connection. And it's a two wire pre-loaded system with a main system wire and a wire through the left subclavian artery branch. And this has predominately been delivered with a through and through wire of

that left subclavian branch. The system is based on the valiant device with tip capture. The left subclavian artery branch is also unique to this system. It's a nitinol helical stent, with polyester fabric. It has a proximal flare,

which allows fixation in that volcano cone. Comes in three diameters and they're all the same length, forty millimeters, with a fifteen french profile. The delivery system, which is delivered from the groin, same access point as the main body device. We did complete the early feasibility study

with nine subjects at three sites. The goals were to validate the procedure, assess safety, and collect imaging data. We did publish that a couple of years ago. Here's a case demonstration. This was a sixty-nine year old female

with a descending thoracic aneurysm at five and a half centimeters. The patient's anatomy met the criteria. We selected a thirty-four millimeter diameter device, with a twelve millimeter branch. And we chose to extend this repair down to the celiac artery

in this patient. The pre-operative CT scan looks like this. The aneurysm looks bigger with thrombus in it of course, but that was the device we got around the corner of that arch to get our seal. Access is obtained both from the groin

and from the arm as is common with many TEVAR procedures. Here we have the device up in the aorta. There's our access from the arm. We had a separate puncture for a "pigtail". Once the device is in position, we "snare" the wire, we confirm that we don't have

any "wire wrap". You can see we went into a areal position to doubly confirm that. And then the device is expanded, and as it's on sheath, it does creep forward a bit. And we have capture with that through and through wire

and tension on that through and through wire, while we expand the rest of the device. And you can see that the volcano is aligned right underneath the left subclavian artery. There's markers there where there's two rings, the outer and the inner ring of that volcano.

Once the device is deployed with that through and through wire access, we deliver the branch into the left subclavian artery. This is a slow deployment, so that we align the flair within the volcano and that volcano is flexible. In some patients, it sort of sits right at the level of

the aorta, like you see in this patient. Sometimes it protrudes. It doesn't really matter, as long as the two things are mated together. There is some flexibility built in the system. In this particular patient,

we had a little leak, so we were able to balloon this as we would any others. For a TEVAR, we just balloon both devices at the same time. Completion Angiogram shown here and we had an excellent result with this patient at six months and at a year the aneurysm continued

to re-sorb. In that series, we had successful delivery and deployment of all the devices. The duration of the procedure has improved with time. Several of these patients required an extension. We are in the feasibility phase.

We've added additional centers and we continue to enroll patients. And one of the things that we've learned is that details about the association between branches and the disease are critical. And patient selection is critical.

And we will continue to complete enrollment for the feasibility and hopefully we will see the pivotal studies start soon. Thank you very much

- So, I'm going to probably echo many of the themes that Gary just touched upon here. These are my disclosures. So, if we look at the CHEST guidelines on who should get pharmacomechanical techniques, it is very very very sobering, and I apologize if the previous speakers have shown this slide,

but essentially, what's right now being disseminated to the American College of CHEST Physicians is that nobody should get catheter-directed thrombolysis, the concept of pharmacomechanical technique should really only reserved as a last-ditch effort if nothing else works, if you happen to have somebody

with extraordinary expertise in your institution, it could not be more of a damning recommendation for what I'm about to talk to you about for the next eight or nine minutes or so. So, then the question is, what is the rationale? What are we talking about here?

And again, I'm going to say that Gary and I, I think are sort of kindred spirits in recognizing that we really do need to mature this concept of the catheter-based technique for pulmonary embolism. So, I'm going to put out a hypothetical question, what if there was a single session/single device therapy

for acute PE, Gary showed one, that could avoid high dose lytics, avoid an overnight infusion, acutely on the table lower the PA pressure, acutely improve the function of the right ventricle, rapidly remove, you know, by angiography,

thrombus and clot from the pulmonary artery, and it was extremely safe, what if we had that? Would that change practice? And I would respectfully say, yes it would. And then what if this concept has already been realized, and we're actually using this across the world

for STEMI, for stroke, for acute DVT, and so why not acute pulmonary embolism? What is limiting our ability to perform single session, rapid thrombus removal and

patient stabilization on the table? Gary showed this slide, there's this whole litany of different devices, and I would argue none of them is exactly perfect yet, but I'm going to try and sort of walk you through what has been developed in an attempt

to reach the concept of single session therapy. When we talk about pharmacomechanical thrombectomy or thrombo-aspiration, it really is just one line item on the menu of all the different things that we can offer patients that present with acutely symptomatic PE, but it is important to recognize

what the potential benefits of this technology are and, of course, what the limitations are. When we look at this in distinction to stroke or STEMI or certainly DVT, it's important to recognize that during a surgical pulmonary embolectomy case, the clot that's able to be extracted is quite impressive,

and this is a very very very sobering amount of material that is typically removed from the patient's right heart and their pulmonary circulation, so, in order to innovate and iterate a percutaneous technology based on existing concepts,

it really does demand significant disruption to achieve the goals, we have not tackled this yet in terms of our endovascular tool kit. So, what is the role? Well, it's potentially able to debulk in acute PE, in an intermediate risk patient which would

ideally eliminate the need for overnight lysis, as Gary alluded to, but what if it could actually replace surgical embolectomy in high risk patients? I think many of us have had the conversation where we, we sort of don't know that's there a

experienced, comfortable surgeon to do an embolectomy within the building or within immediate access to the patient that we see crashing in front of our eyes. I'm very very lucky here in New York that I've incredible cardiovascular surgeons that are able to perform this procedure very very safely 24/7,

but I know that's not the case across the country. So, one of our surgeons who actually came from the Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston developed this concept, which was the sort of first bridge between surgical embolectomy and percutaneous therapy, which is a large bore aspiration catheter,

it's a 22 French cannula that was originally designed to be placed through a cutdown but can now be placed percutaneously, and I think many of us in the room are familiar with this technology, but essentially you advance this under fluoroscopy into the right heart,

place the patient on venous-venous bypass, and a trap, which is outside the patient, is demonstrated in the lower left portion of the screen here, is able to capture any thrombotic material and then restore the circulation via the contralateral femoral vein,

any blood that is aspirated. Very very scant data on this, here's the experience from Michael and Kenny up in Boston where they tried this technology in just a handful of cases, this was followed by John Moriarty's experience from UCLA, where he actually argued a little bit of caution

using this technology, largely related to its inability to safely and reliably deliver it to the pulmonary circulation. To that end, AngieDynamics is funding a prospective registry really looking at safety and efficacy at delivering this device to the pulmonary circulation

and its ability to treat acute pulmonary embolism as well as any right heart clot, but that data's not commercially available yet. This is just one case that we did recently of a clot in transit, which I would argue could not be treated with any other technology

and the patient was able to be discharged the same day, I personally think this is a wonderful application of this technology and is our default strategy right now for a very large clot in transit. The second entrance to the space is the Inari FlowTriever device, which is a 20 French cannula,

it does not require a perfusion team in vein-vein bypass, the concept is simple, a 20 French guide catheter is advanced into the pulmonary circulation and these trilobed disks, which function like a stentriever for stroke are deployed in the pulmonary circulation, retracted to allow the clot to be delivered to the guide cath,

and then using manual aspiration, the clot is retrieved from the patient. Just a few case reports in small series describing this, this one in JACC two years ago, showing quite robust ability to extract a clot, this company which is a relatively small company funded a

single-arm prospective trial enrolling 168 patients, and not only did they complete enrollment last year, but they actually received FDA approval, now there is no peer-reviewed literature on this, it has undergone public presentation, but we, we really don't know exactly which patients were treated,

and so we really can't dissect this, I think there is a learning curve to this technology, and it's not, certainly, ready for broad dissemination yet, we just don't know which patients are ideal for it currently. Another technology, the Penumbra CAT8 system,

a market reduction in the size, an 8 French catheter based technology, this is exact same technology that's used for thrombo-aspiration for acute ischemic stroke, currently just in a slightly different size, and then a number of cases demonstrating its efficacy at

alleviating the acute nonperfusion of an entire lobe, as Gary was referring to previously, and this is one of our cases from our own lab, where you see there's no perfusion of the right, middle and lower lobe, I'm not sure if I can get these movies to play here, oh here it goes,

and so using sort of a handmade separator, we were able to restore perfusion again to the right, middle and lower lobe here, so just one example where, I think there is a potential benefit of thrombo-aspiration in a completely occluded segment.

There has been a wealth of literature about this technology, mostly demonstrating safety and efficacy, the most recent one on the bottom right in CVIR demonstrates the ability to acutely reduce the PA pressures on the table with the use of this technology, and to that end,

Akhi Sista, our faculty here this morning, is the national principal investigator of a US multicenter prospective study looking at exactly that, to try and prove that this technology is safe and effective in the treatment of submassive pulmonary embolism, so more to come on that.

Lastly, the AngioJet System, probably the most reported and studied technology, this is a 6 French technology by default, a wealth of literature here showing safety and efficacy, however, due to adverse event reporting, this technology currently has black box label warnings

in the treatment of acute pulmonary embolism, so clearly this technology should not be used by the novice, and there are significant safety concerns largely related to bradyarrhythmias and hypotension, that being said, again, it is a quite experienced technology for this. So where do we currently stand?

I think we clearly see there are several attributes for thrombo-aspiration including just suction aspiration, a mechanical stent-triever technology, and the ability to not just insanguinate the patient but actually restore circulation and not make the patient anemic, here,

you can see where these technologies are going in terms of very very large bore and very small bore, I placed the question marked right in the center which is where I think this technology needs to converge in order to lead to the disruption for the broad adoption of a single session technology.

So, numerous devices exist, all the devices have been used clinically and have demonstrated the ability to be delivered in aspirary pulmonary embolus, at present, unfortunately there is no consensus regarding which device should be used for which patients and in which clinical presentations,

we need many prospective studies to demonstrate the safety and clinical benefit for our patients, we desperately do need a single session therapy, again, I completely agree with Gary on this, but there is a lot of work yet to do. Thank you for your attention.

- Thank you very much and I would like to thank Dr. Veit for the kind invitation, this is really great meeting. Those are my disclosures. Percutaneous EVAR has been first reported in the late 1990's. However, for many reasons it has not been embraced

by the vascular community, despite the fact that it has been shown that the procedure can be done under local anesthesia and it decreases OR time, time to ambulation, wound complication and length of stay. There are three landmark papers which actually change this trend and make PEVAR more popular.

All of these three papers concluded that failure or observed failure of PEVAR are observed and addressed in the OR which is a key issue. And there was no late failures. Another paper which is really very prominent

is a prospective randomize study that's reported by Endologix and published in 2014. Which revealed that PEVAR closure of the arteriotomy is not inferior to open cut down. Basically, this paper also made it possible for the FDA to approve the device, the ProGlide device,

for closure of large bore arteriotomies, up to 26 in the arterial system and 29 in the venous system. We introduced percutaneous access first policy in our institution 2012. And recently we analyzed our results of 272 elective EVAR performed during the 2012 to 2016.

And we attempted PEVAR in 206 cases. And were successful in 92% of cases. But the question was what happened with the patient that failed PEVAR? And what we found that was significantly higher thrombosis, vessel thrombosis,

as well as blood loss, more than 500 cc in the failed PEVAR group. Similarly, there was longer operative time and post-operative length of stay was significantly longer. However, in this relatively small group of patients who we scheduled for cut-down due to different reasons,

we found that actually there was no difference between the PEVAR and the cut-down, failed PEVAR and cut-down in the terms of blood loss, thrombosis of the vessel, operative time and post-operative length of stay. So what are the predictors of ProGlide failure?

Small vessel calcification, particularly anterior wall calcification, prior cut-down and scarring of the groin, high femoral bifurcation and use of large bore sheaths, as well as morbid obesity. So how can we avoid failures?

I think that the key issue is access. So we recommend that all access now or we demand from our fellow that when we're going to do the operation with them, cut-down during fluoroscopy on the ultra-sound guidance, using micropuncture kits and access angiogram is actually mandatory.

But what happened when there is a lack of hemostasis once we've deployed two PEVARs? Number one, we try not to use more than three ProGlide on each side. Once the three ProGlide failed we use the angioseal. There's a new technique that we can have body wire

and deployed angioseal and still have an access. We also developed a technique that we pack the access site routinely with gelfoam and thrombin. And also we use so-called pull and clamp technique, shown here. Basically what it is, we pull the string of the ProGlide

and clamp it on the skin level. This is actually a very very very good technique. So in conclusion, PEVAR first approach strategy successful in more than 90% of cases, reduced operative time and postoperative length of stay, the failure occurred more commonly when the PEVAR

was completed outside of IFU, and there was no differences in outcome between failed PEVAR and planned femoral cut-down. Thank you.

- Thank you. I have two talks because Dr. Gaverde, I understand, is not well, so we- - [Man] Thank you very much. - We just merged the two talks. All right, it's a little joke. For today's talk we used fusion technology

to merge two talks on fusion technology. Hopefully the rest of the talk will be a little better than that. (laughs) I think we all know from doing endovascular aortic interventions

that you can be fooled by the 2D image and here's a real life view of how that can be an issue. I don't think I need to convince anyone in this room that 3D fusion imaging is essential for complex aortic work. Studies have clearly shown it decreases radiation,

it decreases fluoro time, and decreases contrast use, and I'll just point out that these data are derived from the standard mechanical based systems. And I'll be talking about a cloud-based system that's an alternative that has some advantages. So these traditional mechanical based 3D fusion images,

as I mentioned, do have some limitations. First of all, most of them require manual registration which can be cumbersome and time consuming. Think one big issue is the hardware based tracking system that they use. So they track the table rather than the patient

and certainly, as the table moves, and you move against the table, the patient is going to move relative to the table, and those images become unreliable. And then finally, the holy grail of all 3D fusion imaging is the distortion of pre-operative anatomy

by the wires and hardware that are introduced during the course of your procedure. And one thing I'd like to discuss is the possibility that deep machine learning might lead to a solution to these issues. How does 3D fusion, image-based 3D fusion work?

Well, you start, of course with your pre-operative CT dataset and then you create digitally reconstructed radiographs, which are derived from the pre-op CTA and these are images that resemble the fluoro image. And then tracking is done based on the identification

of two or more vertebral bodies and an automated algorithm matches the most appropriate DRR to the live fluoro image. Sounds like a lot of gobbledygook but let me explain how that works. So here is the AI machine learning,

matching what it recognizes as the vertebral bodies from the pre-operative CT scan to the fluoro image. And again, you get the CT plus the fluoro and then you can see the overlay with the green. And here's another version of that or view of that.

You can see the AI machine learning, identifying the vertebral bodies and then on your right you can see the fusion image. So just, once again, the AI recognizes the bony anatomy and it's going to register the CT with the fluoro image. It tracks the patient, not the table.

And the other thing that's really important is that it recognizes the postural change that the patient undergoes between the posture during the CT scan, versus the posture on the OR table usually, or often, under general anesthesia. And here is an image of the final overlay.

And you can see the visceral and renal arteries with orange circles to identify them. You can remove those, you can remove any of those if you like. This is the workflow. First thing you do is to upload the CT scan to the cloud.

Then, when you're ready to perform the procedure, that is downloaded onto the medical grade PC that's in your OR next to your fluoro screen, and as soon as you just step on the fluoro pedal, the CYDAR overlay appears next to your, or on top of your fluoro image,

next to your regular live fluoro image. And every time you move the table, the computer learning recognizes that the images change, and in a couple of seconds, it replaces with a new overlay based on the obliquity or table position that you have. There are some additional advantages

to cloud-based technology over mechanical technology. First of all, of course, or hardware type technology. Excuse me. You can upgrade it in real time as opposed to needing intermittent hardware upgrades. Works with any fluoro equipment, including a C-arm,

so you don't have to match your 3D imaging to the brand of your fluoro imaging. And there's enhanced accuracy compared to mechanical registration systems as imaging. So what are the clinical applications that this can be utilized for?

Fluoroscopy guided endovascular procedures in the lower thorax, abdomen, and pelvis, so that includes EVAR and FEVAR, mid distal TEVAR. At present, we do need two vertebral bodies and that does limit the use in TEVAR. And then angioplasty stenting and embolization

of common iliac, proximal external and proximal internal iliac artery. Anything where you can acquire a vertebral body image. So here, just a couple of examples of some additional non EVAR/FEVAR/TEVAR applications. This is, these are some cases

of internal iliac embolization, aortoiliac occlusion crossing, standard EVAR, complex EVAR. And I think then, that the final thing that I'd like to talk about is the use with C-arm, which is think is really, extremely important.

Has the potential to make a very big difference. All of us in our larger OR suites, know that we are short on hybrid availability, and yet it's difficult to get our institutions to build us another hybrid room. But if you could use a high quality 3D fusion imaging

with a high quality C-arm, you really expand your endovascular capability within the operating room in a much less expensive way. And then if you look at another set of circumstances where people don't have a hybrid room at all, but do want to be able to offer standard EVAR

to their patients, and perhaps maybe even basic FEVAR, if there is such a thing, and we could use good quality imaging to do that in the absence of an actual hybrid room. That would be extremely valuable to be able to extend good quality care

to patients in under-served areas. So I just was mentioning that we can use this and Tara Mastracci was talking yesterday about how happy she is with her new room where she has the use of CYDAR and an excellent C-arm and she feels that she is able to essentially run two rooms,

two hybrid rooms at once, using the full hybrid room and the C-arm hybrid room. Here's just one case of Dr. Goverde's. A vascular case that he did on a mobile C-arm with aortoiliac occlusive disease and he places kissing stents

using a CYDAR EV and a C-arm. And he used five mils of iodinated contrast. So let's talk about a little bit of data. This is out of Blain Demorell and Tara Mastrachi's group. And this is use of fusion technology in EVAR. And what they found was that the use of fusion imaging

reduced air kerma and DSA runs in standard EVAR. We also looked at our experience recently in EVAR and FEVAR and we compared our results. Pre-availability of image based fusion CT and post image based fusion CT. And just to clarify,

we did have the mechanical product that Phillip's offers, but we abandoned it after using it a half dozen times. So it's really no image fusion versus image fusion to be completely fair. We excluded patients that were urgent/emergent, parallel endographs, and IBEs.

And we looked at radiation exposure, contrast use, fluoro time, and procedure time. The demographics in the two groups were identical. We saw a statistically significant decrease in radiation dose using image based fusion CT. Statistically a significant reduction in fluoro time.

A reduction in contrast volume that looks significant, but was not. I'm guessing because of numbers. And a significantly different reduction in procedure time. So, in conclusion, image based 3D fusion CT decreases radiation exposure, fluoro time,

and procedure time. It does enable 3D overlays in all X-Ray sets, including mobile C-arm, expanding our capabilities for endovascular work. And image based 3D fusion CT has the potential to reduce costs

and improve clinical outcomes. Thank you.

- Thank you very much for the nice introduction for the privilege to start the aortic session with this nice, very interesting topic about Chimney technique and especially about the in-vitro testing which we have done in Muenster in Germany. So, the Chimney endovascular technique we treat short necks as we see here.

With the use of off-the-shelf devices and the placement is in parallel and outside configuration of the main abdominal device. Well, if you see the literature we can see enthusiastic reports with the use of these alternative therapeutic options,

showing low incidence of endo leaks, excellent patency, and durability of these endovascular solutions. On the other side we have also centers with suboptimal experience, as we see here from Manchester, in the titled already publication,

late ruptures after single chimneys or from the group from Florida, highlight that the technique raises cause for concern. So what are the reasons for these divergent experience? Could be the heterogeneity of the used materials, but also the degree of oversizing

of the aortic stent graft? In order to evaluate that, we performed first of all a chimney case of a patient with a huge paraanastomotic aneurysm which we did with single chimney for the right renal artery, as we see here.

What we have done is the CT scan of these patients, we send to a special company and create this silicone model one by one with the anatomy of this treated case, as we see here, having a diameter of 28 millimeter, exact the anatomy of the renals,

of the neck length, infrarenally. And it was also really nice the opportunity to have a fluid simulation system, and we can have also the possibility to bring the device in the CT scan, and perform CT angiography, as we can see here,

very nicely the pictail catheter into the descending aorta, and evaluating now the impact of the different devices for this technique. Here is the example with the device you see here how we deploy the chimney graft, here is an Incraft stent graft for the right renal artery.

The first attempt was to evaluate the impact of different abdominal devices. If we use the same chimney graft in this particular case, the Icast for Advanta V12, and you see what we changed was only the type of the stent graft of the aorta.

If you see here the CT scan analysis, you see very nicely these combination of a mitral endoskeleton of the enduring device with a rigid, but very good, intraradial force Advanta V12, or Icast. You can see here how nicely performs

around the chimney graft. And if we see also in the reconstruction, we have a very nice expansion of the chimney graft, especially in the proximal edge, which is very important in order to have a good patency over the time.

You see here very nicely the expansion of the proximal edge of the balloon expandable covered stent Let's see now what happened with the Incraft. Again, you see here very nice the radial force of the Icast is here very nice to see. However, we have seen a completely different behavior

of the abdominal stent graft of this company. You see here that we have potentially more gutters compared to the other conformability of the endurant around the chimney graft. So it was a very nice sign and finding and showing the impact of the abdominal stent graft

for this technique. What we have done after that was we took the endurant device and we changed now the use of the chimney graft, so we used in the first attempt the self-expanding covered stents, the Viabahn,

versus a balloon expandable covered stent like the Begraft. And if you see here the results, you see again a very nice expansion of the endurant around the chimney graft, but in the reconstruction you see here the severe compression of the Viabahn self-expanding stent

has poor radial force despite that we lined we had per se 70 percent stenosis. I think it's a very important finding crucial compared to the balloon expandable chimney grafts you see here the Begraft, they had also a very good expansion

as balloon-expandable covered did, but also we see here completely different area of gutters if we compare the two balloon expandable covered stents in the anterior and posterior phase, you see here the Begraft plus seems to perform better. The impact of degree of oversizing we know

from the work of Riambaud 30 percent is the recommendation if you see this very nice analysis, you see here with 15 percent oversizing, we have this area of gutter versus 30 percent of oversizing you see a very nice conformability around the chimney that we chose how important is for this technique

to have enough fabric material to wrap up the chimney grafts. In conclusion, ladies and gentlemen, we have seen in this very nice in-vitro testing that indeed the area of the gutters vary depending on the different device combinations.

And also we have seen how important is the appropriate device selection, and 30 percent oversizing to obtain optimal results. Thank you very much.

- Good afternoon to everybody. Thank you very much, dear moderators, dear chairmen. I'm going to show you some technical manipulation in order to increase our success in the worst patient. If we take in account the literature

about the outcome and the technical procedure, we know that we have very few papers, less than few 500 patients studied in below the ankle papers. And so we, together with Roberto Ferraresi and Mariano, we published this flow chart

and everyday we use this kind of approach in our patient. What is clear that from these latest papers included the one in press by Roberto that the calcified patient, so patient with endovascular problems with diabetes and with end-stage renal disease are the worst.

So patient with the small artery disease how Roberto called, are really difficult to be treated. You can see here how difficult is when we cross, we succeeded in crossing with wire to advance a balloon

in the middle of the severe calcification. So how to manage this calcified patient once the wire crossed the lesion. We thought about a technique to help us we call the Pull the Guide Wire-Balloon System Technique and we can use even

dedicated CTO catheter to cross the lesion. What about the Pull the Guide Wire-Balloon System? We have to perform a retrograde distal puncture at the wire level, externalize the wire through the needle, put a torquer device at the balloon wire cone,

and pull the wire-balloon system until we succeed in crossing the lesion. This is the example. You can pull, perform the puncture at the wire level with the wire. We can go into the needle

so we can externalize the wire and when we have the wire in our hand we can easily put at the back of the wire a torque device in the back of the wire and we fix the torque device at the cone of the balloon.

So it's possible in this way to pull the wire and we pull the balloon together with the wire. And 98% of cases we can succeed in crossing the lesion. Of course we use a balloon with a single marker with a very very low profile and when we successfully cross the lesion

we can predilate easily. Another case with the very distal occlusion, an uncrossable in the quite to the arch, very close to the arch, and you can see the puncture with the needle directly into the arch.

The externalization of the wire through the needle and then we pull the system together and so we could advance. You can see here, it's a very very thin balloon with two markers this time,

but we could advance the balloon until the target. Another special catheter which could help us advance through the calcium is the Turnpike Catheter by Teleflex. It's a sort of catheter with a screw in the tip. You can see here the long calcified occlusion

of the posterior tibia, the difficulty to advance, the impossibility to advance a single marker low profile one for balloon and the advancement of the turnpike catheter screwed on the same wire

can doctorize the lesion and let another balloon cross the lesion and perform the angiopathy with very good final results. So in conclusion, the main technical issues and the limitation actually for this kind of patient

is the amount of calcium, I mean the severe amount of calcium and of course new techniques and tools could help us to cross calcified lesion and to fix them. Of course it could be not clinically useful in patient with no outflow.

So patient with the small artery disease. Thank you very much for your attention.

- Thank you Dr. Veith and Dr. Helan for the honor of the podium and for being included in this very prestigious panel. I appreciate it greatly. These are my disclosures. So there's a number of established strategies with fenestrated EVAR to overcome some of the challenges

that we face during these procedures. For downward oriented target arteries we employ brachial access, we deflect wires and catheters off of the top cap or a balloon that can be inflated. Fixed angle sheaths,

getting access into the target vessels can be accomplished by swallowing the balloon or replace a balloon into the target vessel first, inflate it and then deflate it while we're pushing forward on the sheath. And also the large bore femoral access

on the contralateral side allows us to have multiple access sites, multiple sheaths, but this oftentimes requires 20, 22 French sheaths to accomplish this. Well this standard FEVAR technique is what I adopted when I first went out into practice

and as often is the case, necessity becomes the mother of invention. And when we lost access to the beacon tip Van Schie catheters, we had to come up with alternative techniques for gaining access to these vessels

and for accomplishing these procedures. And what this strategy has eventually evolved in to is what I've coined as next generation FEVAR, and I take a slightly different approach from the well-established techniques. And these are the ancillaries that you need

to perform these procedures. The main thing is the conformable sheaths which has completely changed my approach to doing these procedures. And I'll show you a single case that illustrates many of the strengths of these conformable sheaths

and the strengths of this technique. But the conformable sheaths that are available in the United States are twofold. The Oscor Destino Twist, which is available in 6.5, seven French, and 8.5 French. There's also a 12 French sheath available as well

with variable deflection curves. The Aptus TourGuide is actually manufactured by Oscor and sold through an OEM to now Medtronic, but it is exactly the same type of the conformable sheath available in the same sizes and deflectable curves.

As far as our contralateral sheath, what I've found with this technique is that we've been able to significantly downsize the contralateral sheath to allow access by only using Rosen wires and leaving Rosen wires only behind in most of

the selected and wired vessels. This is a 16 French and now what I employ is a 14 French dry seal in almost all of our cases. So this is a patient with a juxtarenal aneurysm that had an accessory lower pole or duplicated left renal and a rather large IMA

that we incorporated through a PMAG design in the, in his repair. And this video shows the conformable sheath acting as not only the sheath but the selection catheter as it goes in to the fenestration and out into the target artery.

As we move to the next step, the glide wire then is passed into the vessel followed by a quick cross catheter, and then we exchange the glide wire for a Rosen, and then leave the Rosen behind and move on to the next vessel.

This is selection of the celiac and then selection of the right renal. And then the left renal. And actually we were able to get the second renal as well with this setup. This is one of the,

so this is delivering the stent to the celiac as we move back up and we kind of just reverse the order as we go back to one of the first vessels that we selected. And we would never attempt this maneuver with a fixed angled sheath. But the strength of the conformable sheath

allows it to maintain its shape and actually throw the stent across the fenestration and into the vessel rather than having the sheath into the target vessel and unsheathing it. We then can use the conformable sheath to select downward deflected branches as the IMAs illustrates.

And on the one month post-CTA all vessels are stented, widely patent, aneurysm sac has actually begun to shrink, and this is our 3D rendering of that one month CTA. So with my move I started keeping track of the amount of time it takes to catheterize these vessels. Real time from the start of catheterization to the end

of the final vessel being catheterized. And we did this in 57 consecutive cases with a total of 215 total fenestrations. I used brachial access not at all during any of these cases and we recorded this time. And what we found in those 57 cases

is that we had a mean of 30 minutes from the time we put the conformable sheath in to the time we were done selecting all of the vessels, that all the target vessels and had Rosen wires in those vessels. When we subtracted out the few outliers that we had

with high grade stenoses or extreme angulated origins, we ended up with a mean and a median that came together at about 21 minutes. The cost comparison has been raised as an issue, but when you actually only use one sheath it's actually cheaper to use the conformable approach

and it doesn't take into account the billed hybrid OR time which can be upwards of $200 per minute. The cost of brachial access and decreased target cannulation wire time. So in summary FEVAR with this approach and with conformable sheaths

facilitates selection of fenestrations, downward deflected branches and target arteries. It avoids the complications of brachial access and large bore contralateral sheaths. It provides additional stability to allow delivery of appropriately sized covered stents

and it simplifies the technique and decreases the costs. Thank you.

- [Presenter] Thank you very much, Mr. Chairman, and ladies and gentlemen, and Frank Veith for this opportunity. Before I start my talk, actually, I can better sit down, because Hans and I worked together. We studied in the same city, we finished our medical study there, we also specialized in surgery

in the same city, we worked together at the same University Hospital, so what should I tell you? Anyway, the question is sac enlargement always benign has been answered. Can we always detect an endoleak, that is nice. No, because there are those hidden type II's,

but as Hans mentioned, there's also a I a and b, position dependent, possible. Hidden type III, fabric porosity, combination of the above. Detection, ladies and gentlemen, is limited by the tools we have, and CTA, even in the delayed phase

and Duplex-scan with contrast might not always be good enough to detect these lesions, these endoleaks. This looks like a nice paper, and what we tried to do is to use contrast-enhanced agents in combination with MRI. And here you see the pictures. And on the top you see the CTA, with contrast,

and also in the delayed phase. And below, you see this weak albumin contrast agent in an MRI and shows clearly where the leak is present. So without this tool, we were never able to detect an endoleak with the usual agents. So, at this moment, we don't know always whether contrast

in the Aneurysm Sac is only due to a type II. I think this is an important message that Hans pushed upon it. Detection is limited by the tools we have, but the choice and the success of the treatment is dependent on the kind of endoleak, let that be clear.

So this paper has been mentioned and is using not these advanced tools. It is only using very simple methods, so are they really detecting type II endoleaks, all of them. No, of course not, because it's not the golden standard. So, nevertheless, it has been published in the JVS,

it's totally worthless, from a scientific point of view. Skip it, don't read it. The clinical revelance of the type II endoleak. It's low pressure, Hans pointed it out. It works, also in ruptured aneurysms, but you have to be sure that the type II is the only cause

of Aneurysm Sac Expansion. So, is unlimited Sac Expansion harmless. I agree with Hans that it is not directly life threatening, but it ultimately can lead to dislodgement and widening of the neck and this will lead to an increasing risk for morbidity and even mortality.

So, the treatment of persistent type II in combination with Sac Expansion, and we will hear more about this during the rest of the session, is Selective Coil-Embolisation being preferred for a durable solution. I'm not so much a fan of filling the Sac, because as was shown by Stephan Haulan, we live below the dikes

and if we fill below the dikes behind the dikes, it's not the solution to prevent rupture, you have to put something in front of the dike, a Coil-Embolisation. So classic catheterisation of the SMA or Hypogastric, Trans Caval approach is now also popular,

and access from the distal stent-graft landing zone is our current favorite situation. Shows you quickly a movie where we go between the two stent-grafts in the iliacs, enter the Sac, and do the coiling. So, prevention of the type II during EVAR

might be a next step. Coil embolisation during EVAR has been shown, has been published. EVAS, is a lot of talks about this during this Veith meeting and the follow-up will tell us what is best. In conclusions, the approach to sac enlargement

without evident endoleak. I think unlimited Sac expansion is not harmless, even quality of life is involved. What should your patient do with an 11-centimeter bilp in his belly. Meticulous investigation of the cause of the Aneurysm Sac

Expansion is mandatory to achieve a, between quote, durable treatment, because follow-up is crucial to make that final conclusion. And unfortunately, after treatment, surveillance remains necessary in 2017, at least. And this is Hans Brinker, who put his finger in the dike,

to save our country from a type II endoleak, and I thank you for your attention.

- The main results of the mid-term, I would call it rather than long-term, there were three years of the improved trial, were published almost immediately after the Veith Symposium last year. I have no disclosures other than to say this was a great team effort, and it wasn't just me,

it was all the many contributors to this project. I think the important thing to start with is to understand the design. This was a randomized trial of unselected patients with a clinical diagnosis of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm.

The trial was to investigate whether EVAR as a first option, or an endovascular strategy, would save lives compared with open repair. We randomized 613 patients quite quickly across 30 centers, and this comprised 67 percent of those who would have been eligible for this trial, so good external validity.

Survival was the primary outcome for this trial. This was assessed at 30 days, one, and three years. At 30 days as you can see there was no difference between the endovascular strategy group in blue, and the open repair group in red. However, already at 30 days we noticed

that of the discharges in the endovascular strategy group, 97 percent of these went home, versus only 77 percent in the open repair group. No significant difference in survival at one year, but now out at three years, the survival is 56 percent in the endovascular strategy

group versus 48 percent in the open repair group. This is not quite significant. If we look only at the 502 patients who actually had a repair of a rupture, the benefits of the endovascular strategy are much stronger. And a compliance analysis,

because there were some crossovers in this pragmatic trial, shows very similar results. And for the 133 women, these were the real beneficiaries of an endovascular strategy. The cumulative incidence of re-interventions to three years are shown here, and no difference between open

and endovascular strategy. And I'll dwell on these in more detail in a later presentation. But this did mean that there was no additional cost to the endovascular strategy over the three year period. I'd also like to point out to you that

apart from the re-interventions, the need for renal support in the early days was 50 percent more common after open repair. Patients had rather different concerns about their complications to clinicians. And when we discussed this with patients they were most

concerned about limb amputation and possibly unclosed stomas. All of these were relatively uncommon, but we had a great collaboration with the other two ruptured aneurysm trials in Europe, AJAX and ECAR. And we put our data together.

Took 12 months, and here you can see the very consistent results. That amputations are considerably less common after endovascular repair for rupture than open repair. We've just heard about quality of life. In Improve Trial there were real gains in quality of life.

Up to three years in the endovascular strategy group. And since costs were lower, this meant that this strategy was highly cost-effective. So in summary, at three years an endovascular strategy proves to be better than open repair. With better survival, higher qualities for the patients

in the endovascular strategy group, marginally lower costs, and it's cost-effective. And we've heard quite a lot even at this meeting about our new NICE guidelines in the UK. But an endovascular strategy is actually being recommended by them for the repair of ruptures.

And I think the most cogent reasons to recommend endovascular repair are the fact that it has benefits for patients at all time points. It gives them what they want: Getting home quickly, better quality of life, lower rates of amputation and open stoma,

and better midterm survival. Thank you very much.

- Thank you very much, Frank, ladies and gentlemen. Thank you, Mr. Chairman. I have no disclosure. Standard carotid endarterectomy patch-plasty and eversion remain the gold standard of treatment of symptomatic and asymptomatic patient with significant stenosis. One important lesson we learn in the last 50 years

of trial and tribulation is the majority of perioperative and post-perioperative stroke are related to technical imperfection rather than clamping ischemia. And so the importance of the technical accuracy of doing the endarterectomy. In ideal world the endarterectomy shouldn't be (mumbling).

It should contain embolic material. Shouldn't be too thin. While this is feasible in the majority of the patient, we know that when in clinical practice some patient with long plaque or transmural lesion, or when we're operating a lesion post-radiation,

it could be very challenging. Carotid bypass, very popular in the '80s, has been advocated as an alternative of carotid endarterectomy, and it doesn't matter if you use a vein or a PTFE graft. The result are quite durable. (mumbling) showing this in 198 consecutive cases

that the patency, primary patency rate was 97.9% in 10 years, so is quite a durable procedure. Nowadays we are treating carotid lesion with stinting, and the stinting has been also advocated as a complementary treatment, but not for a bail out, but immediately after a completion study where it

was unsatisfactory. Gore hybrid graft has been introduced in the market five years ago, and it was the natural evolution of the vortec technique that (mumbling) published a few years before, and it's a technique of a non-suture anastomosis.

And this basically a heparin-bounded bypass with the Nitinol section then expand. At King's we are very busy at the center, but we did 40 bypass for bail out procedure. The technique with the Gore hybrid graft is quite stressful where the constrained natural stint is inserted

inside internal carotid artery. It's got the same size of a (mumbling) shunt, and then the plumbing line is pulled, and than anastomosis is done. The proximal anastomosis is performed in the usual fashion with six (mumbling), and the (mumbling) was reimplanted

selectively. This one is what look like in the real life the patient with the personal degradation, the carotid hybrid bypass inserted and the external carotid artery were implanted. Initially we very, very enthusiastic, so we did the first cases with excellent result.

In total since November 19, 2014 we perform 19 procedure. All the patient would follow up with duplex scan and the CT angiogram post operation. During the follow up four cases block. The last two were really the two very high degree stenosis. And the common denominator was that all the patients

stop one of the dual anti-platelet treatment. They were stenosis wise around 40%, but only 13% the significant one. This one is one of the patient that developed significant stenosis after two years, and you can see in the typical position at the end of the stint.

This one is another patient who develop a quite high stenosis at proximal end. Our patency rate is much lower than the one report by Rico. So in conclusion, ladies and gentlemen, the carotid endarterectomy remain still the gold standard,

and (mumbling) carotid is usually an afterthought. Carotid bypass is a durable procedure. It should be in the repertoire of every vascular surgeon undertaking carotid endarterectomy. Gore hybrid was a promising technology because unfortunate it's been just not produced by Gore anymore,

and unfortunately it carried quite high rate of restenosis that probably we should start to treat it in the future. Thank you very much for your attention.

- Thank you, good morning everybody. Thank you for the kind invitation, Professor Veith, it's an honor for me to be here again this year in New York. I will concentrate my talk about the technical issues and the experience in the data we have already published about the MISACE in more than 50 patients.

So I have no disclosure regarded to this topic. As you already heard, the MISACE means the occlusion of the main stem of several segmental arteries to preserve the capability of the collateral network to build new arteries. And as a result, we developed

the ischemic preconditioning of the spinal cord. Why is this so useful? Because it's an entirely endovascular first stage of a staged approach to treat thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm in order to reduce the ischemic spinal cord injury.

How do you perform the MISACE? Basically, we perform the procedure in local anesthesia, through a percutaneous trans-femoral access using a small-bore sheath. The patient is awake, that means has no cerebrospinal fluid damage

so we can monitor the patient's neurological for at least 48 hours after the procedure. So, after the puncture of the common femoral artery, using a technique of "tower of power" in order to cannulate the segmental arteries. As you can see here, we started with a guiding catheter,

then we place a diagnosis catheter and inside, a microcatheter that is placed inside the segmental artery. Then we started occlusion of the ostial segment of the segmental artery. We use coils or vascular plugs.

We don't recommend the use of fluids due to the possible distal embolization and the consequences. Since we have started this procedure, we have gained a lot of experience and we have started to ask,

what is a sufficient coilembolization? As you can see here, this artery, we can see densely packed coils inside, but you can see still blood flowing after the coil. So, was it always occluding, or is it spontaneous revascularization?

That, we do not know yet. The question, is it flow reduction enough to have a ischemic precondition of the spinal cord? Another example here, you can see a densely packed coil in the segmental artery at the thoracic level. There are some other published data

with some coils in the segm the question is, which technique should we use, the first one, the second one? Another question, is which kind of coil to use? For the moment, we can only use the standard coils

in our center, but I think if we have 3-D or volume coils or if you have microvascular plugs that are very compatible with the microcatheter, we have a superior packing density, we can achieve a better occlusion of the segmental artery, and we have less procedure time and radiation time,

but we have to think of the cost. We recommend to start embolization of the segmental artery, of course, at the origin of it, and not too far inside. Here, you can see a patient where we have coiled a segmental artery very shortly after the ostium,

but you can see here also the development of the collaterals just shortly before the coils, leading to the perfusion of segmental artery that was above it. As you can see, we still have a lot of open question. Is it every patent segmental artery

a necessary to coil? Should we coil only the large ones? I show you an example here, you can see this segmental artery with a high-grade stenotic twisted ostium due to aortic enlargement.

I can show you this segmental artery, six weeks after coiling of a segmental artery lower, and you can see that the ostium, it's no more stenotic and you can see also the connection between the segmental artery below to the initial segmental artery.

Another question that we have, at which level should we start the MISACE? Here, can see a patient with a post-dissection aneurysm after pedicle technique, so these are all uncovered dissection stent, and you can see very nicely the anterior spinal artery

feeded by the anterior radiculomedullary artery from the segmental artery. So, in this patient, in fact, we start the coiling exactly at the seat of this level, we start to coil the segmental artery that feeds the anterior spinal artery.

So, normally we find this artery of the Th 9 L1, and you can see here we go upwards and downwards. We have some challenges with aneurysm sac enlargement, in this case, we use this technique to open the angle of the catheter, we can use also deflectable steerable sheath

in order to reach the segmental artery. And you can see here our results, again, I just will go fast through those, we have treated 57 patients, most of them were Type II, Type III aortic aneurysms. We have found in median nine patent segmental artery

at the level of the aorta to be treated, between 2 and 26, and we have coiled in multiple sessions with a mean interval of 60 days between the sessions. No sooner than seven days we perform the complete exclusion of the aneurysm

in order to let the collateral to develop, and you can see our result: at 30 days we had no spinal cord ischemia. So I can conclude that our first experience suggest that MISACE is feasible, safe, and effective, but segmental artery coiling in thoracoabdominal aneurysm

can be challenging, it's a new field with many open questions, and I looking forward for the results with PAPA_ARTiS study. Thank you a lot.

- Thank you for introduction. Thanks to Frank Veith for the kind invitation to present here our really primarily single-center experience on this new technique. This is my disclosure. So what you really want

in the thromboembolic acute events is a quick flow restoration, avoid lytic therapies, and reduce the risk of bleeding. And this can be achieved by surgery. However, causal directed local thrombolysis

is much less invasive and also give us a panoramic view and topographic view that is very useful in these cases. But it takes time and is statistically implied

and increases risk of bleeding. So theoretically percutaneous thrombectomy can accomplish all these tasks including a shorter hospital stay. So among the percutaneous thrombectomy devices the Indigo System is based on a really simple

aspiration mechanism and it has shown high success in ischemic stroke. This is one of my first cases with the Indigo System using a 5 MAX needle intervention

adapted to this condition. And it's very easy to understand how is fast and effective this approach to treat intraprocedural distal embolization avoiding potential dramatic clinical consequences, especially in cases like this,

the only one foot vessel. This is also confirmed by this technical note published in 2015 from an Italian group. More recently, other papers came up. This, for example, tell us that

there has been 85% below-the-knee primary endpoint achievement and 54% in above-the-knee lesions. The TIMI score after VAT significantly higher for BTK lesions and for ATK lesions

a necessity of a concomitant endovascular therapy. And James Benenati has already told us the results of the PRISM trials. Looking into our case data very quickly and very superficially we can summarize that we had 78% full revascularization.

In 42% of cases, we did not perform any lytic therapy or very short lytic therapy within three hours. And in 36% a long lytic therapy was necessary, however within 24 hours. We had also 22% failure

with three surgery necessary and one amputation. I must say that among this group of patients, twenty patients, there were also patients like this with extended thrombosis from the groin to the ankle

and through an antegrade approach, that I strongly recommend whenever possible, we were able to lower the aspiration of the clots also in the vessel, in the tibial vessels, leaving only this region, thrombosis

needed for additional three hour infusion of TPA achieving at the end a beautiful result and the patient was discharged a day after. However not every case had similar brilliant result. This patient went to surgery and he went eventually to amputation.

Why this? And why VAT perform better in BTK than in ATK? Just hypotheses. For ATK we can have unknown underlying chronic pathology. And the mismatch between the vessel and the catheter can be a problem.

In BTK, the thrombus is usually soft and short because it is an acute iatrogenic event. Most importantly is the thrombotic load. If it is light, no short, no lytic or short lytic therapy is necessary. Say if heavy, a longer lytic therapy and a failure,

regardless of the location of the thrombosis, must be expected. So moving to the other topic, venous occlusive thrombosis. This is a paper from a German group. The most exciting, a high success rate

without any adjunctive therapy and nine vessels half of them prosthetic branch. The only caution is about the excessive blood loss as a main potential complication to be checked during and after the procedure. This is a case at my cath lab.

An acute aortic renal thrombosis after a open repair. We were able to find the proximate thrombosis in this flush occlusion to aspirate close to fix the distal stenosis

and the distal stenosis here and to obtain two-thirds of the kidney parenchyma on both sides. And this is another patient presenting with acute mesenteric ischemia from vein thrombosis.

This device can be used also transsympatically. We were able to aspirate thrombi but after initial improvement, the patient condition worsened overnight. And the CT scan showed us a re-thrombosis of the vein. Probably we need to learn more

in the management of these patients especially under the pharmacology point of view. And this is a rapid overview on our out-of-lower-limb case series. We had good results in reimplanted renal artery, renal artery, and the pulmonary artery as well.

But poor results in brachial artery, fistula, and superior mesenteric vein. So in conclusion, this technology is an option for quick thromboembolic treatment. It's very effective for BTK intraprocedural embolic events.

The main advantage is a speeding up the blood flow and reestablishing without prolonged thrombolysis or reducing the dosage of the thrombolysis. Completely cleaning up extensive thromobosed vessels is impossible without local lytic therapies. This must be said very clearly.

Indigo technology is promising and effective for treatment of acute renovisceral artery occlusion and sub massive pulmonary embolism. Thank you for your attention. I apologize for not being able to stay for the discussion

because I have a flight in a few hours. Thank you very much.

- Thank you very much, Mr. Chairman. Thank you Frank Veith for the invitation, talking about, "SFA lesions can be treated endovascularly: "Should they be?" I do not have any potential conflict of interest for this presentation, and I would like to share with you. We have two ways: Is it technically feasible

to perform always reverse canalization by endovascular technique, and the SFA, and should we do it? And I would like to immediately conclude by it's possible for me to treat all the lesions by endovascular technique in the SFA and popliteal lesion, and for me, I think, for us it's always the first choice.

So, next: What we do to really need an SFA re-canalization and a SFA repair? To be well armed with guides and catheter to perform re-canalization, and it's necessary how to get by unusual ways:

retrograde puncture of each over. And the difficulty is to know if we perform subintimal re-canalization or not, and the success of this technique is always the reentry. So for me, I think it's very important to have a right and clear process when

you perform a re-canalization, and to treat by endovascular therapy, SFA, and popliteal lesion, and I think we can perform a first dilation with POVAR with a balloon superior of 1 mm, compared to the diameter of the SFA.

And it's very important to perform an inflation during three minutes and to follow with a slow deflation and a gentle removal. And stent to the diameter of the SFA, and maybe it's important to use, in certain cases of the DEB.

So the success keys: Is a good experience of re-canalization, a good knowledge of the devices, and a preparation of the vessel. For me, it's very important and the quality of the angiogram tube,

so I would like to share you some example. Here is the example, and a thrombosis occlusion of the whole SFA, and for me you can see on the angiogram the results and it's very important to have a disparation of the decrease of the collateral injection

on the angiogram. This is a case with a total occlusion of SFA in the stent And you can see on the angiogram thrombosis of the stent at the anterior, and I performed for this patient retrograde puncture inside the stent,

and I take the guide wire with the retrograde puncture with the snare and I treat the artery. So, to avoid an hematoma at the puncture it's necessary to inflate before the balloon inside the stent

after the re-canalization, and to remove the introducer and to let the inflation during five minutes. And so, another cases with the total occlusion of the SFA and a very good result, and a very difficult case with a lot of calcification, and it's possible to perform SFA endovascular repair with these techniques.

Okay, and a case, total occlusion SFA, popliteal artery, and the leg artery, and we perform a re-canalization and we use a third-generation stent, Supera, and to have a very good result. And in terms of results, what do the studies say? Analysis of endovascular therapy for femoropopliteal disease

with the Supera stent in Journal of Vascular Surgery shows primary patency is very good, at 90% at one year. Another study, the study with my colleagues, we've used a third-generation of stent with a very good result at 24 months. And open surgery and the estimated

five-year primary patency was 64%. Okay, and in conclusion: For me, "There is no impregna "There are only badly attacked citadels." Thank you very much for your attention.

- [Speaker] Good morning everybody thanks for attending the session and again thanks for the invitation. These are my disclosures. I will start by illustrating one of the cases where we did not use cone beam CT and evidently there were numerous mistakes on this

from planning to conducting the case. But we didn't notice on the completion of geography in folding of the stent which was very clearly apparent on the first CT scan. Fortunately we were able to revise this and have a good outcome.

That certainly led to unnecessary re intervention. We have looked at over the years our usage of fusion and cone beam and as you can see for fenestrated cases, pretty much this was incorporated routinely in our practice in the later part of the experience.

When we looked at the study of the patients that didn't have the cone beam CT, eight percent had re intervention from a technical problem that was potentially avoidable and on the group that had cone beam CT, eight percent had findings that were immediately revised with no

re interventions that were potentially avoidable. This is the concept of our GE Discovery System with fusion and the ability to do cone beam CT. Our protocol includes two spins. First we do one without contrast to evaluate calcification and other artifacts and also to generate a rotational DSA.

That can be also analyzed on axial coronal with a 3D reconstruction. Which essentially evaluates the segment that was treated, whether it was the arch on the arch branch on a thoracoabdominal or aortoiliac segment.

We have recently conducted a prospective non-randomized study that was presented at the Vascular Annual Meeting by Dr. Tenario. On this study, we looked at findings that were to prompt an immediate re intervention that is either a type one

or a type 3 endoleak or a severe stent compression. This was a prospective study so we could be judged for being over cautious but 25% of the procedures had 52 positive findings. That included most often a stent compression or kink in 17% a type one or three endoleak

in 9% or a minority with dissection and thrombus. Evidently not all this triggered an immediate revision, but 16% we elected to treat because we thought it was potentially going to lead to a bad complication. Here is a case where on the completion selective angiography

of the SMA this apparently looks very good without any lesions. However on the cone beam CT, you can see on the axial view a dissection flap. We immediately re catheterized the SMA. You note here there is abrupt stop of the SMA.

We were unable to catheterize this with a blood wire. That led to a conversion where after proximal control we opened the SMA. There was a dissection flap which was excised using balloon control in the stent as proximal control.

We placed a patch and we got a good result with no complications. But considerably, if this patient was missed in the OR and found hours after the procedure he would have major mesenteric ischemia. On this study, DSA alone would have missed

positive findings in 34 of the 43 procedures, or 79% of the procedures that had positive findings including 21 of the 28 that triggered immediate revision. There were only four procedures. 2% had additional findings on the CT

that were not detectable by either the DSA or cone beam CT. And those were usually in the femoro puncture. For example one of the patients had a femoro puncture occlusion that was noted immediately by the femoro pulse.

The DSA accounts for approximately 20% of our total radiation dose. However, it allows us to eliminate CT post operatively which was done as part of this protocol, and therefore the amount of radiation exposed for the patient

was decreased by 55-65% in addition to the cost containment of avoiding this first CT scan in our prospective protocol. In conclusion cone beam CT has allowed immediate assessment to identify technical problems that are not easily detectable by DSA.

These immediate revisions may avoid unnecessary re interventions. What to do if you don't have it? You have to be aware that this procedure that are complex, they are bound to have some technical mistakes. You have to have incredible attention to detail.

Evidently the procedures can be done, but you would have to have a low threshold to revise. For example a flared stent if the dilator of the relic gleam or the dilator of you bifurcated devise encroach the stent during parts of the procedure. Thank you very much.

(audience applauding)

Disclaimer: Content and materials on Medlantis are provided for educational purposes only, and are intended for use by medical professionals, not to be used self-diagnosis or self-treatment. It is not intended as, nor should it be, a substitute for independent professional medical care. Medical practitioners must make their own independent assessment before suggesting a diagnosis or recommending or instituting a course of treatment. The content and materials on Medlantis should not in any way be seen as a replacement for consultation with colleagues or other sources, or as a substitute for conventional training and study.