Nanomedicine | Applications of Nanotechnology in Interventional Oncology
Nanomedicine | Applications of Nanotechnology in Interventional Oncology
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that's nanotechnology so nanomedicine is the particular usage of nanotech

nanoparticles in medicine and the reason that we think it fantasia's is it's really the size of of things in nature and things in medicine so you can see red blood cells are in the order of nanometers and antibodies

these are all sort of in that same size range there's nano nano particles come in different flavors to liposomes if you think of a cell it has a by lipid layer membrane layer and that's just what a lysosome is and we can create these in

the lab we can create dendrimers it's basically like roots of a tree where we can grow them out to be different sizes that gold nanoshells is just a particle of gold and the reason we like gold is that you can heat it up in it it makes

things hot and then there's some other types of nanoparticles so it's not just one thing it's just a bunch of different structures that we can develop that are

To conclude, interventional radiology provides percutaneous therapeutic techniques for the treatment of symptomatic disc herniations and these techniques are efficacious with a success rate approximately 80 to 85%,

save with a complication rate below 0.5% and they can be attractive alternatives to endoscopic surgical techniques with a longer lasting effect than conservative therapy. Thank you very much. (applause)

So what about if patients have more than just one renal cell carcinoma metastasis? What if they have multiple. So in this study from my institution,

the urology team looked at patients who had all of their tumors resected as opposed to patients who had any of their tumors resected compared to those who had none of them resected. And there was a survival benefit for each of those patients. And these authors wrote a really nice statement

I like in this scenario. And they said limited data exists on the outcomes of these types of patients, and we believe this may result in an unnecessary therapeutic anilism, whereby patients who have multiple lesions

are excluded from an aggressive approach. They're just put onto systemic therapy or comfort care. And why is the literature limited in this case? It's due to the morbidity of surgical resection. So really ablation in these minimally invasive IR techniques provide an opportunity to help this patient population.

So when we're doing this technique, what do we need before we get started? We need adequate preprocedural imaging. So if we're seeing this tumor that's in a bit of a scary location in the proximal femur,

sometimes if we treat that too aggressively that can fracture, but this looks like it's isolated into the medullary cavity. But these patients have multiple imaging modalities and these help. So if we have functional imaging, in this case a PET scan,

we can see it's actually a bilobe lesion that actually is a little bit higher than we might just suspect from the CT alone. And so when we're ablating we make sure to cover that entire territory when we're in this indication

of trying to locally control that disease. Likewise, if we have a patient like this who has sclerotic metastases, prostate or breast cancer, they've been treated. It's a little bit hard to know which of these are actually active disease.

Have they already been treated? Because they'll look like this for the rest of their life. And we do a PET scan and we actually see there's really only one tumor that has FDG uptake or choline uptake and is actually active disease, and so we actually target that tumor.

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