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Ovarian Embolization | Advanced UFE
Ovarian Embolization | Advanced UFE
2016chapterembolisationembolizationlookedmatchedmeasuresmenopausalmenopauseovariansbvSIRsymptoms
New ESVS Guidelines For Treatment Of Occlusive Disease Of The Celiac Trunk And SMA: What Do They Tell Us About The Best Current Treatment
New ESVS Guidelines For Treatment Of Occlusive Disease Of The Celiac Trunk And SMA: What Do They Tell Us About The Best Current Treatment
acuteaneurysmangiographyarteriarterialbowelclinicianembolicembolusendovascularESVSguidelinesimagingischaemialactatemesentericrecommendationrepairrevascularisationthrombotic
2018 Update On KDOQI Guidelines For Dialysis Access
2018 Update On KDOQI Guidelines For Dialysis Access
accessarticlesCongenital Kidney DamageevidenceexternalfistulasguidelineshemointerventionalkdoqiLiving Donor for TransplantmortalitymultinephrologistpediatricradiologistrenalreviewtransplantvascularVascular access
Results Of A Multicenter Italian Registry Of Real World CAS With The C-Guard Mesh Covered Stent: The IRONGUARD 2 Study
Results Of A Multicenter Italian Registry Of Real World CAS With The C-Guard Mesh Covered Stent: The IRONGUARD 2 Study
brachialC-GuardcarotidCASCovered stentcumulativedemographicdeviceembolicembolic protection deviceenrolledexternalInspire MDminormyocardialneurologicneurologicalocclusionongoingpatientsproximalratestenosisstenttiastranscervicaltransfemoral
Why Open Endarterectomy Is The Best Treatment For Common Femoral Artery Lesions: It Is Still The Gold Standard In Most Cases Despite What You May Read And Hear
Why Open Endarterectomy Is The Best Treatment For Common Femoral Artery Lesions: It Is Still The Gold Standard In Most Cases Despite What You May Read And Hear
amputationarterycommoncommon femoralembolizationendarterectomyendovascularfemoralfemoral arteryhematomaInterventionsmehtamorbiditymortalitypatencypatientsperioperativeprimaryrestenosisrevascularizationrotationalstentstentingstentssuperficialsurgicalsurvivalTECCO
Single Branch Carotid Ch/TEVAR With Cervical Bypasses: A Simple Solution For Some Complex Aortic Arch Lesions: Technical Tips And Results
Single Branch Carotid Ch/TEVAR With Cervical Bypasses: A Simple Solution For Some Complex Aortic Arch Lesions: Technical Tips And Results
accessaccurateaorticarcharterycarotidcarotid arteryCarotid ChimneychallengingchimneyChimney graftcommoncommonlycoveragedeployeddeploymentdevicedissectionselectiveembolizationemergentlyendograftendoleakendovascularexpandableleftmaximummorbidityocclusionpatientsperformedpersistentpublicationsretrogradesealsheathstentssubclaviansupraclavicularTEVARtherapeuticthoracictype
How To Use Hybrid Operating Rooms Optimally Beyond Vascular Procedures: How The Availability Of Mobile C-Arms Can Help
How To Use Hybrid Operating Rooms Optimally Beyond Vascular Procedures: How The Availability Of Mobile C-Arms Can Help
accessAscending Aortic Repair - Suture line DehiscenceaugmentbasicallyDirect Percutaneous Puncture - Percutaneous EmbolizationembolizationembolizefusionguidancehybridimagingincisionlaserlocalizationlungmodalitypatientscannedscannerTherapeutic / Diagnostictraumavascular
With Large Iliac Arteries, When Are Flared Limbs Acceptable And When Are IBDs Needed For Good Results
With Large Iliac Arteries, When Are Flared Limbs Acceptable And When Are IBDs Needed For Good Results
Anaconda / Cook / Gore / Medtronicanatomicalaneurysmarterycommoncommon iliaccomplicationcomplicationscontrastdevicesembolizationendograftendovascularevarFL DeviceflaredIBD (Gore-IBE) / IBD (Cook-ZBIS)iliaciliac arteryimplantedinterventionallatelimbsliteratureobservationaloutcomeperioperativesuboptimaltechnicallytherapeuticurokinase
Long-Term Histologic Evaluation Of Resected AVMs In Head And Neck Post-Onyx Embolization
Long-Term Histologic Evaluation Of Resected AVMs In Head And Neck Post-Onyx Embolization
avmsdosedosimetersembolizationendothelialgiantheadhistologicinflammatoryinterstitialLiquid embolization systemlymphaticMedtronicminimalneckonyxradiationrecanalizationresectskinvenousvesselvesselsvialswallwalled
Surveillance Protocol And Reinterventions After F/B/EVAR
Surveillance Protocol And Reinterventions After F/B/EVAR
aneurysmangiographicaorticarteryBbranchbranchedcatheterizationcatheterizedceliaccommoncommon iliacembolizationembolizedendoleakendoleaksevarFfenestratedfenestrationFEVARgastricgrafthepatichypogastriciiiciliacimplantleftleft renalmayomicrocatheternidusOnyx EmbolizationparaplegiapreoperativeproximalreinterventionreinterventionsrenalrepairreperfusionscanstentStent graftsuperselectivesurgicalTEVARtherapeuticthoracicthoracoabdominaltreatedtypeType II Endoleak with aneurysm growth of 1.5 cmVeithvisceral
New Information With Longer Follow-Up From The Multicenter Trial Of The Gore IBD For Iliac Aneurysms
New Information With Longer Follow-Up From The Multicenter Trial Of The Gore IBD For Iliac Aneurysms
anatomicaneurysmaneurysmsarterybilateralbranchbuttockclaudicationclinicalcontralateraldatadevicedevicesdysfunctionembolizationendoleakendoleaksevarexpansionsfreedomgoreGORE ExcluderGORE Medicalhypogastriciliaciliac branchIliac branch systemimportantlyincidenceinternalinternal iliacipsilateralocclusionsoutcomespatencypatientspivotalratesregistryreinterventiontechnicaltherapeutictrialtypeVeith
With Complex AAAs, How To Make Decisions Re Fenestrations vs. Branches: Which Bridging Branch Endografts Are Best
With Complex AAAs, How To Make Decisions Re Fenestrations vs. Branches: Which Bridging Branch Endografts Are Best
anatomicanatomyaneurysmaneurysmsaorticarteriesballoonBARDBEVARbranchbranchedbranchesceliaccenterscombinationCoveracovereddeviceendovascularexpandableextremityfenestratedFenestrated EndograftfenestrationfenestrationsFEVARincidencemayoocclusionocclusionsphenotypeproximalproximallyrenalrenal arteriesrenalsreproduciblestentstentstechnicaltherapeutictortuositytypeversusViabah (Gore) / VBX (Gore) / Bentely (Bentely)visceral
Cloud Based System For Image Fusion Techniques With Mobile C-Arms (The Cydar System): How Does It Work And Advantages For All Vascular Interventions
Cloud Based System For Image Fusion Techniques With Mobile C-Arms (The Cydar System): How Does It Work And Advantages For All Vascular Interventions
anatomyaorticaortoiliacAortoiliac occlusive diseasebasedBilateral Kissing StentsbodiesclinicalcontrastCydar EV (Cydar Medical) - Cloud SoftwaredecreasesderivedendovascularevarFEVARfluorofluoroscopyfusionhardwarehybridiliacimageimagesimagingmechanicaloverlaypatientpostureprocedureproximalqualityradiationreductionscanstandardstatisticallytechnologyTEVARTherapeutic / DiagnostictrackingvertebralZiehm ImagingZiehm RFD C-arm
When To Refer Patients For Hemodialysis Access And Who Should Monitor The Maturation Process
When To Refer Patients For Hemodialysis Access And Who Should Monitor The Maturation Process
accessappropriatelyAV AccessAV Vascular AccessbilateralcatheterchronicCKD-Stage 4creatinineDialysisdisadvantagesegfrFistulapatientpatientspermanentpredictingproteinproteinuriareferralrenalrisksurgeontrajectoryvalidatedvascularveinswrist
2-Year ANCHOR Registry Data Show That Endoanchors Can Prevent Neck Dilatation After EVAR With Self-Expanding Devices
2-Year ANCHOR Registry Data Show That Endoanchors Can Prevent Neck Dilatation After EVAR With Self-Expanding Devices
aneurysmaortaaorticappositionarterydegenerativediameterdilatationdistalEndoanchorEndoanchor systemendograftendoleaksendovascularevargraftHeli-FXlowestMedtronicnecknegligibleoccurredoversizepatientspredictorspresenceprotectiveproximalrenalrenal arterystabilizesuprarenaltherapeuticType 1A endoleackvariables
Do Re-Interventions Cause EVAR Infections
Do Re-Interventions Cause EVAR Infections
52 mm AAAAAA EndoprothesisanterioraortoentericbacteremiacatheterembolizationendograftendoleakendovascularevarexcluderexplantfluidglutealgoreGore Excluder cuffgraftiliacinfectioninfectionsinguinalInterventionsmedicaremortalityonsetperioperativeprophylacticpurulentreadmissionsriskscansecondaryseedingsteriletherapeuticunderwent
Tips And Tricks To Use Endoanchors Optimally And Avoid Failures
Tips And Tricks To Use Endoanchors Optimally And Avoid Failures
anatomicangulatedaorticapproacharterychallengingdeploydeploymentEndoanchor systemendoleakendoleaksendovascularevargraftHeli-FXimaginginfrarenalintraoperativelevelMedtronicneckpatientspreventprophylacticprotectiveproximalrenalstenttherapeuticthrombustreatmentvisceral
Value Of CO2 DSA For Abdominal And Pelvic Trauma: Why And How To Use CO2 Angiography With Massive Bleeding And When To Supplement It With Iodinated Contrast
Value Of CO2 DSA For Abdominal And Pelvic Trauma: Why And How To Use CO2 Angiography With Massive Bleeding And When To Supplement It With Iodinated Contrast
abdominalangiographyanterioraortaaorticarteriogrambasicallybleedingcarboncatheterceliaccoilcontrastdiaphragmdioxideembolizationholeimaginginjectinjectioninjectionsiodinatedliverlowmultiplepatientpelvicrenalruptureselectivesolublesplenictraumavascularizationveinvesselvesselsvolumes
Advantages Of Cook Zenith Spiral Z Limbs For EVARs Landing In The External Iliac Artery
Advantages Of Cook Zenith Spiral Z Limbs For EVARs Landing In The External Iliac Artery
aneurysmarterybuttockclaudicationCook ZenithdeployedendograftendoleaksevarevarsexcellentfinalgrafthelicalhypogastriciliacjapaneselandinglimbobservationalocclusionoperativepatencypatientspercentrenalrequiredspiralSpiral Z graftstenosisstentStent graftstentsstudytripleVeithzenith
Prevalence And Risk Factors For The Chronic Venous Disease - ZEUS Study
Prevalence And Risk Factors For The Chronic Venous Disease - ZEUS Study
chronicclassclassificationclinicaldiagnosticdiseaseepidemiologicalfactorsfemalegeneticmaleostialpatientpatientspopulationpregnancypresenceprevalencerefluxriskseveritystudysymptomaticsymptomsultrasoundvaricoseveinvenous
How To Treat By EVAR Complex Aorto-Iliac AAAs In Patients With Renal Transplants, Horseshoe Or Pelvic Kidneys: Technical Tips
How To Treat By EVAR Complex Aorto-Iliac AAAs In Patients With Renal Transplants, Horseshoe Or Pelvic Kidneys: Technical Tips
accessoryaneurysmalaneurysmsantegradeaorticapproacharteriesarteryatypicalbifurcationbypasscontralateraldistalembolizationendoendograftingendovascularevarfairlyfemoralfenestratedflowfollowuphybridhypogastriciliacincisionmaintainmaneuversmultipleocclusiveOpen Hybridoptionspatientspelvicreconstructionreconstructionsreinterventionsrenalrenal arteryrenalsrepairsurvival
RAAAs Should Be Treated In A High Volume Center; The German National Registry Data Shows Why
RAAAs Should Be Treated In A High Volume Center; The German National Registry Data Shows Why
analysisaneurysmannualbloodcodesdataelectiveevarfavorintactlookedlowermortalitymultilevelmultivariableOARoutcomerelationshiprupturedstatisticallytherapeuticvolume
Highlights Of The ESVS 2018 Carotid Guidelines: Advice Re Optimal Treatment Of Asymptomatic Patients With Carotid Stenosis (ACS)
Highlights Of The ESVS 2018 Carotid Guidelines: Advice Re Optimal Treatment Of Asymptomatic Patients With Carotid Stenosis (ACS)
acasadherenceantihypertensiveantiplateletasymptomaticcarotidCASCEAcontralateralembolizationendarterectomyevaluatedimagingipsilaterallowermedicalocclusionoptimalpatientpatientsrctsrecommendationrevascularizationrisksilentstatinsstenosisstentingstroketherapytreatmentvascularVeithversus
Why A Reinvigoration Of CAS Is Justified By Better Embolic Protection And Newer Mesh Covered Stents; OCT Proves It
Why A Reinvigoration Of CAS Is Justified By Better Embolic Protection And Newer Mesh Covered Stents; OCT Proves It
carotidcarotid stentCASCEAcerebraldemonstratedembolicendovascularincidenceinteractionmicroembolicplaqueprotectionproximalRoadSaverstentstentingstrengthsTerumo interventional systemstherapeuticunprotected
Clinically Relevant Hematologic Concerns In Venous Malformations
Clinically Relevant Hematologic Concerns In Venous Malformations
anecdotalaspirinclinicallycoagulationcomplicationscompressiondegradationelevatedfibrinfibrinogenhematologicheparinincidenceintravascularlesionlesionslevelslocalizedlowmalformationmalformationsmolecularnormalpatientpatientsplateletsclerotherapyTherapeutic / Diagnosticvascularvenousvitaminweight
Surgical Results Of Treating Hepatic Hemangioma And Literature Review
Surgical Results Of Treating Hepatic Hemangioma And Literature Review
adenomaasymptomaticbenignbleedbleedingbloodcapillarycavernouscenterdiagnosisdiagnosticdifferentialexperiencehemangiomahermannlivermalignantmortalityMRIperformsurgeonsurgerysymptomaticsymptomsTherapeutic / Diagnostictransplantationtumorsvessels
Technical Issues And Experience With MIS2ACE In 50 Patients Undergoing Endo TAAA Repair
Technical Issues And Experience With MIS2ACE In 50 Patients Undergoing Endo TAAA Repair
aneurysmanterioraorticarterycoilcoilingcoilscollateralcordembolizationischemicMIS²ACEocclusionPatentpatientperformsegmentalspinalstenotictechniquetherapeuticthoracoabdominal
The Vanguard IEP Balloon PTA System With An Integrated Embolic Protection Filter: How It Works And When It Should Be Used
The Vanguard IEP Balloon PTA System With An Integrated Embolic Protection Filter: How It Works And When It Should Be Used
acuteangioplastyanteriorballoonBalloon angioplasty systembifurcationcapturecapturedchronicContego MedicaldebrisdevicedistalembolicembolizationlesionlesionslimboccludedocclusionplanarpoplitealreocclusionriskrotationalrunoffstentstentstherapeutictibialtotalulcerationVanguard IEPvessel
Pelvic Reflux: Is Coil Embolization The Answer
Pelvic Reflux: Is Coil Embolization The Answer
allergicanalogcoilsdatadiameterembolizationhighlightincompetencemeissnermisdiagnosedovarianpatientspelvicrefluxsymptomatologysymptomstreatingvaricoseveinveinsvenous
Is Coronary Stenting (PCI) Overused As The ORBITA RCT (Comparing Stenting To Medical Treatment Suggests)
Is Coronary Stenting (PCI) Overused As The ORBITA RCT (Comparing Stenting To Medical Treatment Suggests)
anginacabgcoronarydiseaseexerciseinterventionalistsischemiaischemicmedicalobservationaloptimaloptimizedpatientsPCIplaceborevascularizationsymptomstherapeutictherapytrialunderpoweredversus
Are Mesh Covered Stents Living Up To Their Potential For Improving CAS Outcomes: Results Of A RCT
Are Mesh Covered Stents Living Up To Their Potential For Improving CAS Outcomes: Results Of A RCT
assessmentbilateralbiomarkersCASCGuardcomparingcontracontralateraldetectabledetecteddifferenceemboliembolicEmbolic Prevention StentembolismenrolledhoursInspireMD)ipsilateralischemiclesionmaximalmicroneuroneurologicaloperativelypatientpatientsperformedperioperativeplaquepostpostoperativepredilationpreoperativeproteinrandomizedratescoresilentstenosisstentstentssubclinicaltesttherapeuticwallstentWALLSTENT (Boston Scientific) - Endoprosthesis / FilterWire (Boston Scientific) - Embolic Protection System
Transcript

it's infrequent uh the and i will tell you just there's a perfect science in this but we discussed this yesterday at one of the workshops there really is not any good evidence that doing ovarian embolisation is going to injure the ovaries

in fact there's evidence to the opposite of Kevin Kim's group when he was at Johns Hopkins looked at this and they actually looked at ovarian reserve measures of serologic measures and they did not see any impact before and after they did the ovarian

embolisation we did a group of sort of matched pair analysis of what we had 70 patients with ovarian embolziations on and we picked 70 comparators age match contemporaneously matched meaning we that the

patient was close to them and also race matched those are things that are that will actually indicate likely of menopause and we looked at their and we compared them we looked at the menopausal symptoms afterwards using a

valided questionnaire and we looked at a rate of onset of menopause etc and we saw essentially no difference in fact we actually saw the people that had ovarian embolization have fewer menopausal symptoms but that probably was a

statistical fluke but anyway so doing an

- Thank you so much. I have no disclosures. These guidelines were published a year ago and they are open access. You can download the PDF and you can also download the app and the app was launched two months ago

and four of the ESVS guidelines are in that app. As you see, we had three American co-authors of this document, so we have very high expertise that we managed to gather.

Now the ESVS Mesenteric Guidelines have all conditions in one document because it's not always obvious if it's acute, chronic, acute-on-chron if it's arteri

if there's an underlying aneurysm or a dissection. And we thought it a benefit for the clinician to have all in one single document. It's 51 pages, 64 recommendations, more than 300 references and we use the

ESC grading system. As you will understand, it's impossible to describe this document in four minutes but I will give you some highlights regarding one of the chapters, the Acute arterial mesenteric ischaemia chapter.

We have four recommendations on how to diagnose this condition. We found that D-dimer is highly sensitive so that a normal D-dimer value excludes the condition but it's also unfortunately unspecific. There's a common misconception that lactate is

useful in this situation. Lactate becomes elevated very late when the patient is dying. It's not a good test for diagnosing acute mesenteric ischaemia earlier. And this is a strong recommendation against that.

We also ask everyone uses the CTA angiography these days and that is of course the mainstay of diagnoses as you can see on this image. Regarding treatment, we found that in patients with acute mesenteric arterial ischaemia open or endovascular revascularisation

should preferably be done before bowel surgery. This is of course an important strategic recommendation when we work together with general surgeons. We also concluded that completion imaging is important. And this is maybe one of the reasons why endovascular repair tends to do better than

open repair in these patients. There was no other better way of judging the bowel viability than clinical judgment a no-brainer is that these patients need antibiotics and it's also a strong recommendation to do second look laparotomoy.

We found that endovascular treatment is first therapy if you suspect thrombotic occlusion. They had better survival than the open repair, where as in the embolic situation, we found no difference in outcome.

So you can do both open or endo for embolus, like in this 85 year old man from Uppsala where we did a thrombus, or the embolus aspiration. Regarding follow up, we found that it was beneficial to do imaging follow-up after stenting, and also secondary prevention is important.

So in conclusion, ladies and gentlemen, the ESVS Guidelines can be downloaded freely. There are lots of recommendations regarding diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up. And they are most useful when the diagnosis is difficult and when indication for treatment is less obvious.

Please read the other chapters, too and please come to Hamburg next year for the ESVS meeting. Thank You

- I will be talking about new KDOQI guidelines. I know many of you have heard about KDOQI guidelines being revised for the past maybe over a year or maybe two. Yes, it is being done, and it is going slow only because it's being done in a very different way. It's more than an update.

It's going to be more of an overhaul for the entire KDOQI guidelines. We in KDOQI have looked at access as a solitary problem like we talked about grafts, catheters, fistulas for access, but actually it sort of turns out

that access is part of a bigger problem. Fits into a big ESKD lifeline of a patient. Instated distal patients come in many varieties. It can affect any age, and they have a lot of other problems so once you have chronic renal failure, renal replacement mortality fits in

only when it becomes Stage IV or Stage V. And renal replacement mortality is not just access, it is PD access, it's hemo access, it is transplant. So these things, we need to see how they fit in in a given person. So the new KDOQI guidelines concentrates more

on individualizing care. For example, here the young Darien was an 11 year old with a prune belly syndrome. Now he has failed PD. Then there's another person here who is Lydia who is about 36 or 40 year old lady

with a insulin dependent diabetes. Already has bad vascular pedicle. Lost both legs. Needs access. Now both these patient though they need access, it's not the same.

It's different. For example, if you think of Darien, he was in PD but he has failed PD. We would love to get him transplanted. Unfortunately he's got terrible social situation so we can't get him transplanted.

So he needs hemo. Now if he needs hemo, we need to find an access that lasts for a long time because he's got many years ahead of him. On the other hand we have Lydia, who has got significant vascular disease.

With her obesity and existing infectious status, probably PD won't be a good option for her. So she needs hemo, and she's obviously not a transplant candidate. So how are we going to plan for hemo? So these are things which we are to more concentrate

and individualize when we look at patients, and the new guidelines concentrate more on these sort of aspects. Doing right access for right patient, right time, and for right reasons. And we go about planning this keeping the patient first

then a life plan ESKD lifeline for the patient, and what access we are looking at, and what are the needs of the patient? Now this is also different because it has been done more scientifically. We actually have a evidence review team.

We just poured over pretty much 1500 individual articles. Recent articles. And we have looked through about 4000 abstracts and other articles. And this data is correlated through a workgroup. There a lot of new chapters.

Chapter specific surgery like peri-operative, intra-operative, post-operative, cat issues, managing complication issues. And we started off with the coming up with the Scope of Work. The evidence review team took the Scope of Work

and tried to get all the articles and sift through the articles and came up and rated the evidence using a certain rating system which is very scientific. The workgroup then kind of evaluated the whole system, and then came up with what is clinically relevant.

It's one thing for statisticians to say how strong evidence this is, but it's another thing how it is looked upon by the clinicians. So then we kind of put this into a document. Document went through internal and external review process.

This is the process we have tried to do it. Dr. Lok has been the Chair of the group. Myself and Dr. Yevzlin are the Vice-Chairs. We have incredible workgroup which has done most of the work. And here are the workgroup members.

We comprised of nephrologist, transplant surgeons, vascular surgeons, Allied Health personnel, pediatric nephrologist so it's a multi interventional radiologist and interventional nephrologist. This is a multi disciplinary group which has gone through this process.

Timothy Wilt from Minnesota was the head of the Evidence Review Team, who has worked on the evidence building. And now for the editorial sections we have Dr. Huber, Lee, and Dr. Lok taking care of it. So where are we today?

We have pretty much gone through the first part of it. We are at the place where we are ready for the Internal Review and External Review. So many of you probably will get a chance to look through it when it comes for the External Review and would love

to have your comments on this document. Essentially, we are looking at access in the context of end stage renal disease, and that is new. And obviously we have gone through and done a very scientific review, a very scientific methodology to try

to evaluate the evidence and try to come up with guidelines. Thank you.

- Thank you Professor Veith. Thank you for giving me the opportunity to present on behalf of my chief the results of the IRONGUARD 2 study. A study on the use of the C-Guard mesh covered stent in carotid artery stenting. The IRONGUARD 1 study performed in Italy,

enrolled 200 patients to the technical success of 100%. No major cardiovascular event. Those good results were maintained at one year followup, because we had no major neurologic adverse event, no stent thrombosis, and no external carotid occlusion. This is why we decided to continue to collect data

on this experience on the use of C-Guard stent in a new registry called the IRONGUARD 2. And up to August 2018, we recruited 342 patients in 15 Italian centers. Demographic of patients were a common demographic of at-risk carotid patients.

And 50 out of 342 patients were symptomatic, with 36 carotid with TIA and 14 with minor stroke. Stenosis percentage mean was 84%, and the high-risk carotid plaque composition was observed in 28% of patients, and respectively, the majority of patients presented

this homogenous composition. All aortic arch morphologies were enrolled into the study, as you can see here. And one third of enrolled patients presented significant supra-aortic vessel tortuosity. So this was no commerce registry.

Almost in all cases a transfemoral approach was chosen, while also brachial and transcervical approach were reported. And the Embolic Protection Device was used in 99.7% of patients, with a proximal occlusion device in 50 patients.

Pre-dilatation was used in 89 patients, and looking at results at 24 hours we reported five TIAs and one minor stroke, with a combined incidence rate of 1.75%. We had no myocardial infection, and no death. But we had two external carotid occlusion.

At one month, we had data available on 255 patients, with two additional neurological events, one more TIA and one more minor stroke, but we had no stent thrombosis. At one month, the cumulative results rate were a minor stroke rate of 0.58%,

and the TIA rate of 1.72%, with a cumulative neurological event rate of 2.33%. At one year, results were available on 57 patients, with one new major event, it was a myocardial infarction. And unfortunately, we had two deaths, one from suicide. To conclude, this is an ongoing trial with ongoing analysis,

and so we are still recruiting patients. I want to thank on behalf of my chief all the collaborators of this registry. I want to invite you to join us next May in Rome, thank you.

- Thank you. Historically, common femoral endarterectomy is a safe procedure. In this quick publication that we did several years ago, showed a 1.5% 30 day mortality rate. Morbidity included 6.3% superficial surgical site infection.

Other major morbidity was pretty low. High-risk patients we identified as those that were functionally dependent, dyspnea, obesity, steroid use, and diabetes. A study from Massachusetts General Hospital their experience showed 100% technical success.

Length of stay was three days. Primary patency of five years at 91% and assisted primary patency at five years 100%. Very little perioperative morbidity and mortality. As you know, open treatment has been the standard of care

over time the goal standard for a common femoral disease, traditionally it's been thought of as a no stent zone. However, there are increased interventions of the common femoral and deep femoral arteries. This is a picture that shows inflection point there.

Why people are concerned about placing stents there. Here's a picture of atherectomy. Irritational atherectomy, the common femoral artery. Here's another image example of a rotational atherectomy, of the common femoral artery.

And here's an image of a stent there, going across the stent there. This is a case I had of potential option for stenting the common femoral artery large (mumbles) of the hematoma from the cardiologist. It was easily fixed

with a 2.5 length BioBond. Which I thought would have very little deformability. (mumbles) was so short in the area there. This is another example of a complete blow out of the common femoral artery. Something that was much better

treated with a stent that I thought over here. What's the data on the stenting of the endovascular of the common femoral arteries interventions? So, there mostly small single centers. What is the retrospective view of 40 cases?

That shows a restenosis rate of 19.5% at 12 months. Revascularization 14.1 % at 12 months. Another one by Dr. Mehta shows restenosis was observed in 20% of the patients and 10% underwent open revision. A case from Dr. Calligaro using cover stents

shows very good primary patency. We sought to use Vascular Quality Initiative to look at endovascular intervention of the common femoral artery. As you can see here, we've identified a thousand patients that have common femoral interventions, with or without,

deep femoral artery interventions. Indications were mostly for claudication. Interventions include three-quarters having angioplasty, 35% having a stent, and 20% almost having atherectomy. Overall technical success was high, a 91%.

Thirty day mortality was exactly the same as in this clip data for open repair 1.6%. Complications were mostly access site hematoma with a low amount distal embolization had previously reported. Single center was up to 4%.

Overall, our freedom for patency or loss or death was 83% at one year. Predicted mostly by tissue loss and case urgency. Re-intervention free survival was 85% at one year, which does notably include stent as independent risk factor for this.

Amputation free survival was 93% at one year, which factors here, but also stent was predictive of amputation. Overall, we concluded that patency is lower than historical common femoral interventions. Mortality was pretty much exactly the same

that has been reported previously. And long term analysis is needed to access durability. There's also a study from France looking at randomizing stenting versus open repair of the common femoral artery. And who needs to get through it quickly?

More or less it showed no difference in outcomes. No different in AVIs. Higher morbidity in the open group most (mumbles) superficial surgical wound infections and (mumbles). The one thing that has hit in the text of the article

a group of mostly (mumbles) was one patient had a major amputation despite having a patent common femoral artery stent. There's no real follow up this, no details of this, I would just caution of both this and VQI paper showing increased risk amputation with stenting.

Thank you.

- Thanks Dr. Weaver. Thank you Dr. Reed for the invitation, once again, to this great meeting. These are my disclosures. So, open surgical repair of descending aortic arch disease still carries some significant morbidity and mortality.

And obviously TEVAR as we have mentioned in many of the presentations has become the treatment of choice for appropriate thoracic lesions, but still has some significant limitations of seal in the aortic arch and more techniques are being developed to address that.

Right now, we also need to cover the left subclavian artery and encroach or cover the left common carotid artery for optimal seal, if that's the area that we're trying to address. So zone 2, which is the one that's,

it is most commonly used as seal for the aortic arch requires accurate device deployment to maximize the seal and really avoid ultimately, coverage of the left common carotid artery and have to address it as an emergency. Seal, in many of these cases is not maximized

due to the concern of occlusion of the left common carotid artery and many of the devices are deployed without obtaining maximum seal in that particular area. Failure of accurate deployment often leads to a type IA endoleak or inadvertent coverage

of the left common carotid artery which can become a significant problem. The most common hybrid procedures in this group of patients include the use of TEVAR, a carotid-subclavian reconstruction and left common carotid artery stenting,

which is hopefully mostly planned, but many of the times, especially when you're starting, it may be completely unplanned. The left common carotid chimney has been increasingly used to obtain a better seal

in this particular group of patients with challenging arches, but there's still significant concerns, including patients having super-vascular complications, stroke, Type A retrograde dissections and a persistent Type IA endoleak

which can be very challenging to be able to correct. There's limited data to discuss this specific topic, but some of the recent publications included a series of 11 to 13 years of treatment with a variety of chimneys.

And these publications suggest that the left common carotid chimneys are the most commonly used chimneys in the aortic arch, being used 76% to 89% of the time in these series. We can also look at these and the technical success

is very good. Mortality's very low. The stroke rate is quite variable depending on the series and chimney patency's very good. But we still have a relatively high persistent

Type IA endoleak on these procedures. So what can we do to try to improve the results that we have? And some of these techniques are clearly applicable for elective or emergency procedures. In the elective setting,

an open left carotid access and subclavian access can be obtained via a supraclavicular approach. And then a subclavian transposition or a carotid-subclavian bypass can be performed in preparation for the endovascular repair. Following that reconstruction,

retrograde access to left common carotid artery can be very helpful with a 7 French sheath and this can be used for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes at the same time. The 7 French sheath can easily accommodate most of the available covered and uncovered

balloon expandable stents if the situation arises that it's necessary. Alignment of the TEVAR is critical with maximum seal and accurate placement of the TEVAR at this location is paramount to be able to have a good result.

At that point, the left common carotid artery chimney can be deployed under control of the left common carotid artery. To avoid any embolization, the carotid can be flushed, primary repaired, and the subclavian can be addressed

if there is concern of a persistent retrograde leak with embolization with a plug or other devices. The order can be changed for the procedure to be able to be done emergently as it is in this 46 year old policeman with hypertension and a ruptured thoracic aneurism.

The patient had the left common carotid access first, the device deployed appropriately, and the carotid-subclavian bypass performed in a more elective fashion after the rupture had been addressed. So, in conclusion, carotid chimney's and TEVAR

combination is a frequently used to obtain additional seal on the aortic arch, with pretty good results. Early retrograde left common carotid access allows safe TEVAR deployment with maximum seal,

and the procedure can be safely performed with low morbidity and mortality if we select the patients appropriately. Thank you very much.

- So Beyond Vascular procedures, I guess we've conquered all the vascular procedures, now we're going to conquer the world, so let me take a little bit of time to say that these are my conflicts, while doing that, I think it's important that we encourage people to access the hybrid rooms,

It's much more important that the tar-verse done in the Hybrid Room, rather than moving on to the CAT labs, so we have some idea basically of what's going on. That certainly compresses the Hybrid Room availability, but you can't argue for more resources

if the Hybrid Room is running half-empty for example, the only way you get it is by opening this up and so things like laser lead extractions or tar-verse are predominantly still done basically in our hybrid rooms, and we try to make access for them. I don't need to go through this,

you've now think that Doctor Shirttail made a convincing argument for 3D imaging and 3D acquisition. I think the fundamental next revolution in surgery, Every subspecialty is the availability of 3D imaging in the operating room.

We have lead the way in that in vascular surgery, but you think how this could revolutionize urology, general surgery, neurosurgery, and so I think it's very important that we battle for imaging control. Don't give your administration the idea that

you're going to settle for a C-arm, that's the beginning of the end if you do that, this okay to augment use C-arms to augment your practice, but if you're a finishing fellow, you make sure you go to a place that's going to give you access to full hybrid room,

otherwise, you are the subservient imagers compared to radiologists and cardiologists. We need that access to this high quality room. And the new buzzword you're going to hear about is Multi Modality Imaging Suites, this combination of imaging suites that are

being put together, top left deserves with MR, we think MR is the cardiovascular imaging modality of the future, there's a whole group at NIH working at MR Guided Interventions which we're interested in, and the bottom right is the CT-scan in a hybrid op

in a hybrid room, this is actually from MD Anderson. And I think this is actually the Trauma Room of the future, makes no sense to me to take a patient from an emergency room to a CT scanner to an and-jure suite to an operator it's the most dangerous thing we do

with a trauma patient and I think this is actually a position statement from the Trauma Society we're involved in, talk about how important it is to co-localize this imaging, and I think the trauma room of the future is going to be an and-jure suite

down with a CT scanner built into it, and you need to be flexible. Now, the Empire Strikes Back in terms of cloud-based fusion in that Siemans actually just released a portable C-arm that does cone-beam CT. C-arm's basically a rapidly improving,

and I think a lot of these things are going to be available to you at reduced cost. So let me move on and basically just show a couple of examples. What you learn are techniques, then what you do is look for applications to apply this, and so we've been doing

translumbar embolization using fusion and imaging guidance, and this is a case of one of my partners, he'd done an ascending repair, and the patient came back three weeks later and said he had sudden-onset chest pain and the CT-scan showed that there was a

sutured line dehiscence which is a little alarming. I tried to embolize that endovascular, could not get to that tiny little orifice, and so we decided to watch it, it got worse, and bigger, over the course of a week, so clearly we had to go ahead and basically and fix this,

and we opted to use this, using a new guidance system and going directly parasternal. You can do fusion of blood vessels or bones, you can do it off anything you can see on flu-roid, here we actually fused off the sternal wires and this allows you to see if there's

respiratory motion, you can measure in the workstation the depth really to the target was almost four and a half centimeters straight back from the second sternal wire and that allowed us really using this image guidance system when you set up what's called the bullseye view,

you look straight down the barrel of a needle, and then the laser turns on and the undersurface of the hybrid room shows you where to stick the needle. This is something that we'd refined from doing localization of lung nodules

and I'll show you that next. And so this is the system using the C-star, we use the breast, and the localization needle, and we can actually basically advance that straight into that cavity, and you can see once you get in it,

we confirmed it by injecting into it, you can see the pseudo-aneurism, you can see the immediate stain of hematoma and then we simply embolize that directly. This is probably safer than going endovascular because that little neck protects about

the embolization from actually taking place, and you can see what the complete snan-ja-gram actually looked like, we had a pig tail in the aura so we could co-linearly check what was going on and we used docto-gramming make sure we don't have embolization.

This patient now basically about three months follow-up and this is a nice way to completely dissolve by avoiding really doing this. Let me give you another example, this actually one came from our transplant surgeon he wanted to put in a vas,

he said this patient is really sick, so well, by definition they're usually pretty sick, they say we need to make a small incision and target this and so what we did was we scanned the vas, that's the hardware device you're looking at here. These have to be

oriented with the inlet nozzle looking directly into the orifice of the mitro wall, and so we scanned the heart with, what you see is what you get with these devices, they're not deformed, we take a cell phone and implant it in your chest,

still going to look like a cell phone. And so what we did, image fusion was then used with two completely different data sets, it mimicking the procedure, and we lined this up basically with a mitro valve, we then used that same imaging guidance system

I was showing you, made a little incision really doing onto the apex of the heart, and to the eur-aph for the return cannula, and this is basically what it looked like, and you can actually check the efficacy of this by scanning the patient post operatively

and see whether or not you executed on this basically the same way, and so this was all basically developed basing off Lung Nodule Localization Techniques with that we've kind of fairly extensively published, use with men can base one of our thoracic surgeons

so I'd encourage you to look at other opportunities by which you can help other specialties, 'cause I think this 3D imaging is going to transform what our capabilities actually are. Thank you very much indeed for your attention.

- Mr Chairman, dear colleagues. I've nothing to disclose. We know that aneurysm or dilation of the common iliac artery is present in almost 20% of cases submitted to endovascular repair and we have a variety of endovascular solution available. The first one is the internal iliac artery

embolization and coverage which is very technically easy but it's a suboptimal choice due to the higher risk of thrombosis and internal iliac problems. So the flared limbs landing in the common iliac artery is technically easy,

however, the results in the literature are conflicting. Iliac branch devices is a more demanding procedure but has to abide to a specific anatomical conditions and is warranted by good results in the literature such as this work from the group in Perugia who showed a technical success of almost 100%

as you can see, and also good results in other registries. So there are unresolved question about this problem which is the best choice in this matter, flared limbs or iliac branch devices. In order to solve this problem, we have looked at our data,

published them in Journal Vascular Interventional Neurology and this is our retrospective observational study involving treatment with either flared limbs or IBD and these are the flared limbs devices we used in this study. Anaconda, Medtronic, Cook and Gore.

And these are the IFU of the two IBD which were used in this study which were Gore-IBE and Cook-ZBS. So we looked at the 602 EVAR with 105 flared limbs which were also fit for IBD. And on the other side, we looked at EVAR-IBD

implanted in the same period excluding those implanted outside the IFU. So we ended up with 57 cases of IBD inside the IFU. These are the characteristics of the two groups of patients. The main important finding was the year age which was a little younger in the IBD group

and the common iliac artery diameter which was greater, again in the IBD group. So this is the distribution of the four types of flared limbs devices and IBD in the two groups. And as you can see, the procedural time and volume of contrast medium was significantly

higher in the IBD group. Complications did not differ significantly however, overall there were four iliac complication and all occurred in the flared limbs group. When we went to late complications, putting together all the iliac complication, they were significantly

greater in the flared limbs group compared with the IBD with zero percent complication rate. Late complications were always addressed by endovascular relining or relining and urokinase in case of infusion, in case of thrombosis. And as you can see here, the late outcome

did not differ significantly in the two groups. However, when we put together all the iliac complication, the iliac complication free survival was significantly worse in the flared limbs group. So in conclusion, flared limbs and IBD have similar perioperative outcomes.

IBD is more technically demanding, needs more contrast medium and time obviously. The complications in flared limbs are all resolvable by endovascular means and IBD has a better outcome in the long term period. So the take-home message of my presentation

is that we prefer IBD in young patients with high life expectancy and in the presence of anatomical risk factors of flared limbs late complications. Thank you for your attention.

[Mollie Meek] We are going to talk about our histology of head and neck AVMs after Onyx embolization. Like I said previously, we were in love with Onyx at the end of the 2000's. So we used lots and lots of Onyx, and then the patients generally went for resection.

Sometimes immediately, and sometimes years after the embolization. We are not as in love with Onyx anymore, and our hospital was certainly not in love with us using Onyx the way we were using it in the past, because it was super expensive,

and they weren't getting reimbursed for the multiple vials we were using. I had no disclosures. If I have time, I'll talk to you about radiation dose. The most important part is the pathological response. This is a slide of a typical AVM.

You see the thick walled arterial portion of the vascular channels and the thinner walled venous portion. This is just a higher magnification. I am not a pathologist. So when we did our scoring of our specimens,

we scored some acute and inflammatory changes, some chronic inflammatory changes, and then the amount of recanalization that we saw. What we found is that recanalization was extremely common. We saw it in 13 of our 18 specimens,

and the specimens that had minimal inflammatory changes had minimal recanalization. That's the take home message. This is a specimen with Onyx in cast material in the vessels. Trying not to blind our moderators like I did earlier.

This is a really pretty picture of the vessel wall, the Onyx material, and a brand new vessel in the middle of this old vessel. This is what just sort of a scout image of what their faces looked like.

One of, a sample. This is like a longitudinal slice of a vessel. So this is vessel wall on one side, vessel wall on the other side, Onyx material, and then new vessel formation

and interstitial tissue stuff in the middle of that old, big vessel. These are just some pictures. Another example of Onyx with vessels inside the Onyx. We saw a fair amount of giant cell formation, which you can kind of see these clusters

of multi nucleated things, are the giant cells. They come in and clean up the Onyx material. These are just more Onyx specimens. Here's a nice picture of giant cell. We also counted vessel wall necrosis in our tabulations.

And you can see this Onyx material is in the endothelial cells, and it kills the endothelial cells. So we did see some vessel wall necrosis. So the short story is there's no definitive time for the recanalization,

but we think it takes about a year for you to really see nicely formed vessels in the Onyx. And in our experience in the head and neck, it was common. It may be different in other locations, because obviously your head and neck

has different lymphatic ratios and inflammatory things, and there's all kinds of differences between the head and neck, and say your arm or your leg. The second part of this is your radiation dose,

which has been touched on a little bit. The plug and push technique, part of why I don't like it, and why I don't like using Onyx, is it's just slow. You have to wait, and wait.

And it takes a lot of x-ray penetration, because your computer is going to try to up your dose because you've got the black Onyx in the x-ray beam, if that makes any sense. Your machine's going to try to help you, and it amps up your dose

really quickly if you're not careful. And for our head and neck patients, obviously we're doing AP and lateral views. This is our equipment. We put dots, radiation dosimeters on peoples' heads

and one in their oropharynx before our treatments, and we did calculations of a sequence of patients. You can see the ages of the patients in the group, and the number of the patients. This was just for a short time period we did this.

This is the important part, that the AVMs have a much higher skin entrance dose than the venous malfs. Part of that is we don't put on in venous mals. Sometimes I will put glue in a venous mal if a surgeon wants to resect it

because they like the way it comes out when you do that. But otherwise I generally just use alcohol in venous mals. And then these were on X AVMs at this point in time when we collected this data. Some alcohol.

This is a reminder about the dosimetry. And this was the number of sessions, embolization sessions versus the skin entrance dose. And just some more pictures of yeah. So Onyx is not permanent in my histologic experience.

Watch out for wound healing issues and recanalization, and watch out for skin burns. That's it. Thanks.

- Thank you Mr. Chairman. Ladies and gentleman, first of all, I would like to thank Dr. Veith for the honor of the podium. Fenestrated and branched stent graft are becoming a widespread use in the treatment of thoracoabdominal

and pararenal aortic aneurysms. Nevertheless, the risk of reinterventions during the follow-up of these procedures is not negligible. The Mayo Clinic group has recently proposed this classification for endoleaks

after FEVAR and BEVAR, that takes into account all the potential sources of aneurysm sac reperfusion after stent graft implant. If we look at the published data, the reported reintervention rate ranges between three and 25% of cases.

So this is still an open issue. We started our experience with fenestrated and branched stent grafts in January 2016, with 29 patients treated so far, for thoracoabdominal and pararenal/juxtarenal aortic aneurysms. We report an elective mortality rate of 7.7%.

That is significantly higher in urgent settings. We had two cases of transient paraparesis and both of them recovered, and two cases of complete paraplegia after urgent procedures, and both of them died. This is the surveillance protocol we applied

to the 25 patients that survived the first operation. As you can see here, we used to do a CT scan prior to discharge, and then again at three and 12 months after the intervention, and yearly thereafter, and according to our experience

there is no room for ultrasound examination in the follow-up of these procedures. We report five reinterventions according for 20% of cases. All of them were due to endoleaks and were fixed with bridging stent relining,

or embolization in case of type II, with no complications, no mortality. I'm going to show you a couple of cases from our series. A 66 years old man, a very complex surgical history. In 2005 he underwent open repair of descending thoracic aneurysm.

In 2009, a surgical debranching of visceral vessels followed by TEVAR for a type III thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms. In 2016, the implant of a tube fenestrated stent-graft to fix a distal type I endoleak. And two years later the patient was readmitted

for a type II endoleak with aneurysm growth of more than one centimeter. This is the preoperative CT scan, and you see now the type II endoleak that comes from a left gastric artery that independently arises from the aneurysm sac.

This is the endoleak route that starts from a branch of the hepatic artery with retrograde flow into the left gastric artery, and then into the aneurysm sac. We approached this case from below through the fenestration for the SMA and the celiac trunk,

and here on the left side you see the superselective catheterization of the branch of the hepatic artery, and on the right side the microcatheter that has reached the nidus of the endoleak. We then embolized with onyx the endoleak

and the feeding vessel, and this is the nice final result in two different angiographic projections. Another case, a 76 years old man. In 2008, open repair for a AAA and right common iliac aneurysm.

Eight years later, the implant of a T-branch stent graft for a recurrent type IV thoracoabdominal aneurysm. And one year later, the patient was admitted again for a type IIIc endoleak, plus aneurysm of the left common iliac artery. This is the CT scan of this patient.

You will see here the endoleak at the level of the left renal branch here, and the aneurysm of the left common iliac just below the stent graft. We first treated the iliac aneurysm implanting an iliac branched device on the left side,

so preserving the left hypogastric artery. And in the same operation, from a bowl, we catheterized the left renal branch and fixed the endoleak that you see on the left side, with a total stent relining, with a nice final result on the right side.

And this is the CT scan follow-up one year after the reintervention. No endoleak at the level of the left renal branch, and nice exclusion of the left common iliac aneurysm. In conclusion, ladies and gentlemen, the risk of type I endoleak after FEVAR and BEVAR

is very low when the repair is planning with an adequate proximal sealing zone as we heard before from Professor Verhoeven. Much of reinterventions are due to type II and III endoleaks that can be treated by embolization or stent reinforcement. Last, but not least, the strict follow-up program

with CT scan is of paramount importance after these procedures. I thank you very much for your attention.

- [Doctor] Thank you Tom and thanks Dr Veith for the invitation to be here again. These are my disclosures, so hypogastric embolization is not benign, patients can develop buttock claudication, higher after bilateral sacrifice, it can be persistent in up to half of patients. Sexual dysfunction can also occur, and we know that

there can be catastrophic complications but fortunately they're relatively rare. So now these are avoidable, we no longer have to coil and cover in many patients and we can preserve internal iliac's with iliac branch devices like you just heard. We had previously published the results of looking from

the pivotal trial, looking at the Gore IBE device with the six month primary end point showing zero aneurysm-related morality, high rates of technical success, 95% patency of the internal iliac limb, no type one or type three endoleaks and 98% freedom from reintervention. Importantly on the side of the iliac branch device, there

was prevention of new-onset of buttock claudication in all patients, and importantly also on the contralateral side in patients with bilateral aneurysms that were sacrificed, the incidents in a prospect of trial of the development of buttock claudication was 28%, confirming the data from those prior series.

And this is in line with the results of EVAR using iliac branch device published by many others showing low rates of mortality, high rates of technical success and also good patency of the devices. In press now we have results with follow-up out through two years, in the Gore IBE trial, we also compared

those findings to outcomes in a real world experience from the great registry, so 98 patients from the pivotal and continued access arm's of the IBE trial and also 92 patients who underwent treatment with the Gore IBE device in the great registry giving us 190 patients with 207 IBE devices implanted.

Follow-up was up to three years, it was an longer mean follow-up in the IDE study with the IBE device. Looking at outcomes between the clinical trial and the real world experience, they were very similar. There was no aneurysm-related mortality, there was no recorded new-onset ipsilateral buttock claudication,

this is all from the IDE trial since we didn't have that information in the great registry, and looking at the incidence of reinterventions, it was similar both in the IDE clinical trial experience and also in the great registry as well. Looking at patency of the internal iliac limb, it was

93.6%, both at 12 months and 24 months in the prospective US IBE pivotall trial and importantly all the internal iliac limb occlusions occurred very early in the experience likely due to technical or anatomic factors. When we look at the incidence of type two endoleaks, we had previously noted there was a very high incidence of

type two endoleaks, 60% at one month, this did tail off a bit over time but it was still 35% at two years. A total of five patients in the pivotal IBE trial had a reintervention for type two endoleak through two years, and despite that high incidence of type two endoleak, overall the incidence of aortic aneurysm sac expansion

of more than five millimeters has been rare and low at two and nine percent at 12 and 24 months, and there's been no expansions of the treated common iliac artery aneurysm sac's at either 12 or 24 months. Freedom from reintervention has been quite good, 90.4% through two years in the trial and most of these

re-interventions were type two endoleaks. We now have some additional data out through three years in about two thirds of the patients we have imaging data available now through three years in the pivotal IBE trial, there have been no additional events, device related events reported since the two year data and through three years

we have no recorded type one or type three endoleaks, no aneurysm ruptures, no incidences of migration, very high rates of patency of the external and internal iliac arteries, good freedom from re-intervention and good freedom from common iliac artery aneurysm sac enlargement. And I think, in line with these findings, the guidelines

now from the SVS are to recommend preservation of the internal iliac arteries when ever present and that's a grade 1A recommendation, thank you.

- Thank you and thanks again Frank for the kind invitation to be here another year. So there's several anatomic considerations for complex aortic repair. I wanted to choose between fenestrations or branches,

both with regards to that phenotype and the mating stent and we'll go into those. There are limitations to total endovascular approaches such as visceral anatomy, severe angulations,

and renal issues, as well as shaggy aortas where endo solutions are less favorable. This paper out of the Mayo Clinic showing that about 20% of the cases of thoracodynia aneurysms

non-suitable due to renal issues alone, and if we look at the subset that are then suitable, the anatomy of the renal arteries in this case obviously differs so they might be more or less suitable for branches

versus fenestration and the aneurysm extent proximally impacts that renal angle. So when do we use branches and when do we use fenestrations? Well, overall, it seems to be, to most people,

that branches are easier to use. They're easier to orient. There's more room for error. There's much more branch overlap securing those mating stents. But a branch device does require

more aortic coverage than a fenestrated equivalent. So if we extrapolate that to juxtarenal or pararenal repair a branched device will allow for much more proximal coverage

than in a fenestrated device which has, in this series from Dr. Chuter's group, shows that there is significant incidence of lower extremity weakness if you use an all-branch approach. And this was, of course, not biased

due to Crawford extent because the graft always looks the same. So does a target vessel anatomy and branch phenotype matter in of itself? Well of course, as we've discussed, the different anatomic situations

impact which type of branch or fenestration you use. Again going back to Tim Chuter's paper, and Tim who only used branches for all of the anatomical situations, there was a significant incidence of renal branch occlusion

during follow up in these cases. And this has been reproduced. This is from the Munster group showing that tortuosity is a significant factor, a predictive factor, for renal branch occlusion

after branched endovascular repair, and then repeated from Mario Stella's group showing that upward-facing renal arteries have immediate technical problems when using branches, and if you have the combination of downward and then upward facing

the long term outcome is impaired if you use a branched approach. And we know for the renals that using a fenestrated phenotype seems to improve the outcomes, and this has been shown in multiple trials

where fenestrations for renals do better than branches. So then moving away from the phenotype to the mating stent. Does the type of mating stent matter? In branch repairs we looked at this

from these five major European centers in about 500 patients to see if the type of mating stent used for branch phenotype grafts mattered. It was very difficult to evaluate and you can see in this rather busy graph

that there was a combination used of self-expanding and balloon expandable covered stents in these situations. And in fact almost 2/3 of the patients had combinations in their grafts, so combining balloon expandable covered stents

with self expanding stents, and vice versa, making these analyses very very difficult. But what we could replicate, of course, was the earlier findings that the event rates with using branches for celiac and SMA were very low,

whereas they were significant for left renal arteries and if you saw the last session then in similar situations after open repair, although this includes not only occlusions but re-interventions of course.

And we know when we use fenestrations that where we have wall contact that using covered stents is generally better than using bare stents which we started out with but the type of covered stent

also seems to matter and this might be due to the stiffness of the stent or how far it protrudes into the target vessel. There is a multitude of new bridging stents available for BEVAR and FEVAR: Covera, Viabahn, VBX, and Bentley plus,

and they all seem to have better flexibility, better profile, and better radial force so they're easier to use, but there's no long-term data evaluating these devices. The technical success rate is already quite high for all of these.

So this is a summary. We've talked using branches versus fenestration and often a combination to design the device to the specific patient anatomy is the best. So in summary,

always use covered stents even when you do fenestrated grafts. At present, mix and match seems to be beneficial both with regards to the phenotype and the mating stent. Short term results seem to be good.

Technical results good and reproducible but long term results are lacking and there is very limited comparative data. Thank you. (audience applauding)

- Thank you. I have two talks because Dr. Gaverde, I understand, is not well, so we- - [Man] Thank you very much. - We just merged the two talks. All right, it's a little joke. For today's talk we used fusion technology

to merge two talks on fusion technology. Hopefully the rest of the talk will be a little better than that. (laughs) I think we all know from doing endovascular aortic interventions

that you can be fooled by the 2D image and here's a real life view of how that can be an issue. I don't think I need to convince anyone in this room that 3D fusion imaging is essential for complex aortic work. Studies have clearly shown it decreases radiation,

it decreases fluoro time, and decreases contrast use, and I'll just point out that these data are derived from the standard mechanical based systems. And I'll be talking about a cloud-based system that's an alternative that has some advantages. So these traditional mechanical based 3D fusion images,

as I mentioned, do have some limitations. First of all, most of them require manual registration which can be cumbersome and time consuming. Think one big issue is the hardware based tracking system that they use. So they track the table rather than the patient

and certainly, as the table moves, and you move against the table, the patient is going to move relative to the table, and those images become unreliable. And then finally, the holy grail of all 3D fusion imaging is the distortion of pre-operative anatomy

by the wires and hardware that are introduced during the course of your procedure. And one thing I'd like to discuss is the possibility that deep machine learning might lead to a solution to these issues. How does 3D fusion, image-based 3D fusion work?

Well, you start, of course with your pre-operative CT dataset and then you create digitally reconstructed radiographs, which are derived from the pre-op CTA and these are images that resemble the fluoro image. And then tracking is done based on the identification

of two or more vertebral bodies and an automated algorithm matches the most appropriate DRR to the live fluoro image. Sounds like a lot of gobbledygook but let me explain how that works. So here is the AI machine learning,

matching what it recognizes as the vertebral bodies from the pre-operative CT scan to the fluoro image. And again, you get the CT plus the fluoro and then you can see the overlay with the green. And here's another version of that or view of that.

You can see the AI machine learning, identifying the vertebral bodies and then on your right you can see the fusion image. So just, once again, the AI recognizes the bony anatomy and it's going to register the CT with the fluoro image. It tracks the patient, not the table.

And the other thing that's really important is that it recognizes the postural change that the patient undergoes between the posture during the CT scan, versus the posture on the OR table usually, or often, under general anesthesia. And here is an image of the final overlay.

And you can see the visceral and renal arteries with orange circles to identify them. You can remove those, you can remove any of those if you like. This is the workflow. First thing you do is to upload the CT scan to the cloud.

Then, when you're ready to perform the procedure, that is downloaded onto the medical grade PC that's in your OR next to your fluoro screen, and as soon as you just step on the fluoro pedal, the CYDAR overlay appears next to your, or on top of your fluoro image,

next to your regular live fluoro image. And every time you move the table, the computer learning recognizes that the images change, and in a couple of seconds, it replaces with a new overlay based on the obliquity or table position that you have. There are some additional advantages

to cloud-based technology over mechanical technology. First of all, of course, or hardware type technology. Excuse me. You can upgrade it in real time as opposed to needing intermittent hardware upgrades. Works with any fluoro equipment, including a C-arm,

so you don't have to match your 3D imaging to the brand of your fluoro imaging. And there's enhanced accuracy compared to mechanical registration systems as imaging. So what are the clinical applications that this can be utilized for?

Fluoroscopy guided endovascular procedures in the lower thorax, abdomen, and pelvis, so that includes EVAR and FEVAR, mid distal TEVAR. At present, we do need two vertebral bodies and that does limit the use in TEVAR. And then angioplasty stenting and embolization

of common iliac, proximal external and proximal internal iliac artery. Anything where you can acquire a vertebral body image. So here, just a couple of examples of some additional non EVAR/FEVAR/TEVAR applications. This is, these are some cases

of internal iliac embolization, aortoiliac occlusion crossing, standard EVAR, complex EVAR. And I think then, that the final thing that I'd like to talk about is the use with C-arm, which is think is really, extremely important.

Has the potential to make a very big difference. All of us in our larger OR suites, know that we are short on hybrid availability, and yet it's difficult to get our institutions to build us another hybrid room. But if you could use a high quality 3D fusion imaging

with a high quality C-arm, you really expand your endovascular capability within the operating room in a much less expensive way. And then if you look at another set of circumstances where people don't have a hybrid room at all, but do want to be able to offer standard EVAR

to their patients, and perhaps maybe even basic FEVAR, if there is such a thing, and we could use good quality imaging to do that in the absence of an actual hybrid room. That would be extremely valuable to be able to extend good quality care

to patients in under-served areas. So I just was mentioning that we can use this and Tara Mastracci was talking yesterday about how happy she is with her new room where she has the use of CYDAR and an excellent C-arm and she feels that she is able to essentially run two rooms,

two hybrid rooms at once, using the full hybrid room and the C-arm hybrid room. Here's just one case of Dr. Goverde's. A vascular case that he did on a mobile C-arm with aortoiliac occlusive disease and he places kissing stents

using a CYDAR EV and a C-arm. And he used five mils of iodinated contrast. So let's talk about a little bit of data. This is out of Blain Demorell and Tara Mastrachi's group. And this is use of fusion technology in EVAR. And what they found was that the use of fusion imaging

reduced air kerma and DSA runs in standard EVAR. We also looked at our experience recently in EVAR and FEVAR and we compared our results. Pre-availability of image based fusion CT and post image based fusion CT. And just to clarify,

we did have the mechanical product that Phillip's offers, but we abandoned it after using it a half dozen times. So it's really no image fusion versus image fusion to be completely fair. We excluded patients that were urgent/emergent, parallel endographs, and IBEs.

And we looked at radiation exposure, contrast use, fluoro time, and procedure time. The demographics in the two groups were identical. We saw a statistically significant decrease in radiation dose using image based fusion CT. Statistically a significant reduction in fluoro time.

A reduction in contrast volume that looks significant, but was not. I'm guessing because of numbers. And a significantly different reduction in procedure time. So, in conclusion, image based 3D fusion CT decreases radiation exposure, fluoro time,

and procedure time. It does enable 3D overlays in all X-Ray sets, including mobile C-arm, expanding our capabilities for endovascular work. And image based 3D fusion CT has the potential to reduce costs

and improve clinical outcomes. Thank you.

- Thank you, Larry, thank you, Tony. Nice to be known as a fixture. I have no relevant disclosures, except that I have a trophy. And that's important, but also that Prabir Roy-Chaudhury, who's in this picture, was the genesis of some of the thoughts that I'm going to deliver here about predicting renal failure,

so I do want to credit him with bringing that to the vascular access space. You know, following on Soren's talk about access guidelines, we're dealing with pretty old guidelines, but if you look at the 2006 version, you know, just the height--

The things that a surgeon might read in his office. CKD four, patients there, you want a timely referral, you want them evaluated for placement of permanent access. The term "if necessary" is included in those guidelines, that's sometimes forgotten about.

And, of course, veins should be protected. We already heard a little bit about that, and so out our hospital, with our new dialysis patients, we usually try to butcher both antecubital veins at the same time. And then, before we send them to surgery

after they've been vein-marked, we use that vein to put in their preoperative IV, so that's our vascular access management program at Christiana Care. - [Male Speaker] That's why we mark it for you, Teddy. (laughing)

- So, you know, the other guideline is patients should have a functional permanent access at the initiation of dialysis therapy, and that means we need a crystal ball. How do we know this? A fistula should be placed at least six months

before anticipated start of dialysis, or a graft three to six weeks. Anybody who tells you they actually know that is lying, you can't tell, there's no validated means of predicting this. You hear clinical judgment, you can look at

all sorts of things. You cannot really make that projection. Now there is one interesting study by Tangri, and this is what Premier brought to our attention last year at CIDA, where this Canadian researcher and his team developed a model for predicting

progression of chronic kidney disease, not specifically for access purposes, but for others. They looked at a large number of patients in Canada, followed them through chronic kidney disease to ESRD, and they came up with a model. If you look at a simple model that uses age, sex,

estimated GFR from MDRD equation and albuminuria to predict when that patient might develop end stage renal disease, and there's now nice calculators. This is a wonderful thing, I keep it on my phone, this Qx Calculate, I would recommend you do the same,

and you can put those answers to the questions, in this app, and it'll give you the answer you're looking for. So for instance, here's a case, a 75-year-old woman, CKD stage four, her creatinine's 2.7, not very impressive,

eGFR's 18. Her urine protein is 1200 milligrams per gram, that's important, this is kind of one of the major variables that impacts on this. So she's referred appropriately at that stage to a surgeon for arteriovenous access,

and he finds that she really has no veins that he feels are suitable for a fistula, so an appropriate referral was made. Now at that time, if you'd put her into this equation with those variables, 1200, female, 75-year-old, 18 GFR, at two years, her risk of ESRD is about 30%,

and at five years about 66%, 67%. So, you know, how do you use those numbers in deciding if she needs an access? Well, you might say... A rational person might say perhaps that patient should get a fistula,

or at least be put in line for it. Well, this well-intentioned surgeon providing customer service put in a graft, which then ended up with some steal requiring a DRIL, which then still had steal, required banding, and then a few months, a year later

was thrombosed and abandoned because she didn't need it. And I saw her for the first time in October 2018, at which time her creatinine is up to 3.6, her eGFR's down to 12, her protein is a little higher, 2600, so now she has a two-year risk of 62%, and a five-year risk of 95%,

considerably more than when this ill-advised craft was created. So what do you do with this patient now? I don't have the answer to that, but you can use this information at least to help flavor your thought process,

and what if you could bend the curve? What if you treated this patient appropriately with ACE inhibitors and other methods to get the protein down? Well, you can almost half her two-year risk of renal failure with medical management.

So these considerations I think are important to the team, surgeon, nurses, nephrologists, etc., who are planning that vascular access with the patient. When to do and what to do. And then, you know, it's kind of old-fashioned to look at the trajectory.

We used to look at one over creatinine, we can look at eGFR now, and she's on a trajectory that looks suspicious for progression, so you can factor that into your thought process as well. And then I think this is the other very important concept, I think I've spoken about this here before,

is that there's no absolute need for dialysis unless you do bilateral nephrectomies. Patients can be managed medically for quite a while, and the manifestations of uremia dealt with quite safely and effectively, and you can see that over the years, the number of patients

in this top brown pattern that have been started on dialysis with a GFR of greater than 15 has fallen, or at least, stopped rising because we've recognized that there's no advantage, and there may be disadvantages to starting patients too early.

So if your nephrologist is telling I've got to start this patient now because he or she needs dialysis, unless they had bilateral nephrectomies that may or may not be true. Another case,

64-year-old male, CKD stage four, creatinine about four, eGFR 15, 800 milligrams of proteinuria, referred to a vascular access surgeon for AV access. Interesting note, previous central lines, or AICD, healthy guy otherwise.

So in April 2017 he had a left wrist fistula done, I think that was a very appropriate referral and a very appropriate operation by this surgeon. At that time his two-year risk was 49, 50%, his five-year risk 88%. It's a pretty good idea, I think, to get a wrist fistula

in that patient. Once again, this is not validated for that purpose. I can't point you to a study that says by using this you can make well-informed predictions about when to do vascular access, but I do think it helps to flavor the judgment on this.

Also, I saw him for the first time last month, and his left arm is like this. Amazing, that has never had a catheter or anything, so I did his central venogram, and this is his anatomy. I could find absolutely no evidence of a connection between the left subclavian and the superior vena cava,

I couldn't cross it. Incidentally, this was done with less than 20 CCs of dye of trying to open this occlusion or find a way through, which was unsuccessful. You can see all the edema in his arm. So what do you do with this guy now?

Well, up, go back. Here's his trajectory of CKD four from the time his fistula is done to the time I'm seeing him now, he's been pretty flat. And his proteinuria's actually dropped

with medical management. He's only got 103 milligrams per gram of proteinuria now, and his two-year risk is now 23%, his five-year risk is 56%, so I said back to the surgeon we ligate this damn thing, because we can't really do much to fix it,

and we're going to wait and see when it's closer to time to needing dialysis. I'm not going to subject this guy to a right-arm fistula with that trajectory of renal disease over the past two years. So combining that trajectory with these predictive numbers,

and improved medical care for proteinuria I think is a good strategy. So what do you do, you're weighing factors for timing too early, you've got a burden of fistula failure, interventions you need to use to maintain costs, morbidity, complications,

steal, neuropathy that you could avoid versus too late and disadvantages of initiating hemodialysis without a permanent access. And lastly, I'm going to just finish with some blasphemy. I think the risk of starting dialysis with a catheter is vastly overstated.

If you look at old data and patient selection issues, and catheter maintenance issues, I think... It's not such an unreasonable thing to start a patient with a catheter. We do it all the time and they usually live.

And even CMS gives us a 90-day grace period on our QIP penalties, so... If you establish a surgeon and access plan, I think you're good to go. So who monitors access maturation? I don't know, somebody who knows what they're doing.

If you look at all the people involved, I know some of these individuals who are absolute crackerjack experts, and some are clueless. It has nothing to do with their age, their gender, their training, their field. It's just a matter of whether they understand

what makes a good fistula. You don't have to be a genius, you just can't be clueless. This is not a mature usable fistula, I know that when I see it. Thank you.

- These are my disclosures. So aortic neck dilatation is not a new problem. It's been described even before the era of endovascular repair and it's estimated to occur in about 20% of all patients that undergo EVAR two years after the index procedure.

We're seeing more and more cases where patients that survive long enough after EVAR, they develop aortic neck dilatation beyond the nominal diameter of the endograft and like on this patient, this image, large type 1A endoleaks that are difficult to treat.

There's a number of factors that are contributing to aortic neck dilatation including a continuous outward force that is exerted by the endograft. Progression of aortic wall degeneration. Aneurisymal disease is a degenerative procedure.

The presence of endoleaks, particularly type two endoleaks have been implicated in aortic neck dilatation. And then incomplete seal at the proximal neck in the form of microleaks or positional leaks. HeliFX EndoAnchors as you heard were

designed to stabilize and improve the apposition of the endograft to the aortic neck. And as you saw on this video, their presence even when the super no fixation disengages from the wall of the aorta, may help stabilize the graft onto

the aorta and prevent type 1A endoleaks. About three or four years ago we started looking at the anchor registry data, trying to identify predictors of aortic neck dilatation in patients who are undergoing EVAR with EndoAnchors. We published those results about a year ago.

In terms of the one year mark, we had 267 patients in that cohort. We measured the aortic diameter at four different levels. 20 millimeters proximal to the lowest main renal artery and then at the level of the lowest renal artery, five and 10 millimeters distal to that.

We defined the change in diameter that occurred between the pre-implantation EVAR and the first post-implantation EVAR at about one month. As adoptive enlargement due mainly to the effect of endograaft and the interaction with the aortic wall.

And then we defined this dilatation, what occurred between the one month and the 12 month mark, post EVAR. We used 20 different variables and we ran all these variables at the three levels. And what we found in terms of

post-operative neck dilatation is that it occurred in 3.1% of patients at the level of the lowest renal artery. 7.7% five millimeters distal to it and 4.6% at 10 millimeters distal to it. And this is a dilatation with a threshold

of at least three millimeters. We felt that this was much more clinically relevant. In terms of protective factors for adaptive enlargement, the presence of calcium and the aortic diameter of the level of the lowest renal, both of these are easy to understand.

The stiffer the aorta, the lesser the degree of the immediate dilatation. But then when we looked at the true dilatation, we found out that the aortic neck diameter at the lowest renal artery was a significant risk factor as was Endograft oversizing.

So if you started with a large aorta to begin with, these patients were much more likely to develop neck dilatation and if you significantly oversize the endograft that was also an independent risk factor. On the other hand, the neck length as well as the number of EndoAnchors that

were placed in these patients, both appear to have independent protective effects. So the two year preliminary analysis results is what I'm going to present. The analysis is still ongoing, but now we have a larger number of patients, 674.

We performed the same measurements at the same levels. What we found in terms of time course and location of the aortic neck dilatation is that in the suprarenal site, there is negligible dilatation up to 24 months. The largest dilatation occurs at five millimeters,

but more interestingly, a significant number of patients did not even have endograft present in that location. And then at 10 millimeters distal to the lowest renal artery right where most of the aneurysm changes you would expect to occur,

that change in diameter was again negligible. Indirectly suggesting that EndoAnchors have protective effect. So these are our interesting, some interesting insights. Female sex and graft oversize do play a significant role in the post-operative neck dilatation.

With EndoAnchors implanted at the index procedure neck dilatation 10 millimeters distal to the lowest renal artery appears to be negligible both at 12 and at 24 months. But we're working to see a little bit more finer elements at this analysis.

As where exactly the EndoAnchors were placed and how this was associated with the changes in the aortic neck. We hope to have those results later this year. Thank you.

- Good morning. I'd like to thank everybody who's in attendance for the 7 A.M. session. So let's talk about a case. 63 year old male, standard risk factors for aneurismal disease. November 2008, he had a 52 mm aneurism,

underwent Gore Excluder, endovascular pair. Follow up over the next five, relatively unremarkable. Sac regression 47 mm no leak. June 2017, he was lost for follow up, but came back to see us. Duplex imaging CTA was done to show the sac had increased

from 47 to 62 in a type 2 endoleak was present. In August of that year, he underwent right common iliac cuff placement for what appeared to be a type 1b endoleak. September, CT scan showed the sac was stable at 66 and no leak was present. In March, six months after that, scan once again

showed the sac was there but a little bit larger, and a type two endoleak was once again present. He underwent intervention. This side access on the left embolization of the internal iliac, and a left iliac limb extension. Shortly thereafter,

contacted his PCP at three weeks of weakness, fatigue, some lethargy. September, he had some gluteal inguinal pain, chills, weakness, and fatigue. And then October, came back to see us. Similar symptoms, white count of 12, and a CT scan

was done and here where you can appreciate is, clearly there's air within the sac and a large anterior cell with fluid collections, blood cultures are negative at that time. He shortly thereafter went a 2 stage procedure, Extra-anatomic bypass, explant of the EVAR,

there purulent fluid within the sac, not surprising. Gram positive rods, and the culture came out Cutibacterium Acnes. So what is it we know about this case? Well, EVAR clearly is preferred treatment for aneurism repair, indications for use h

however, mid-term reports still show a significant need for secondary interventions for leaks, migrations, and rupture. Giles looked at a Medicare beneficiaries and clearly noted, or at least evaluated the effect of re-interventions

and readmissions after EVAR and open and noted that survival was negatively impacted by readmissions and re-interventions, and I think this was one of those situations that we're dealing with today. EVAR infections and secondary interventions.

Fortunately infections relatively infrequent. Isolated case reports have been pooled into multi-institutional cohorts. We know about a third of these infections are related to aortoenteric fistula, Bacteremia and direct seeding are more often not the underlying source.

And what we can roughly appreciate is that at somewhere between 14 and 38% of these may be related to secondary catheter based interventions. There's some data out there, Matt Smeed's published 2016, 180 EVARs, multi-center study, the timing of the infection presumably or symptomatic onset

was 22 months and 14% or greater had secondary endointerventions with a relatively high mortality. Similarly, the study coming out of Italy, 26 cases, meantime of diagnosis of the infection is 20 months, and that 34.6% of these cases underwent secondary endovascular intervention.

Once again, a relatively high mortality at 38.4%. Study out of France, 11 institutions, 33 infective endographs, time of onset of symptoms 414 days, 30% of these individuals had undergone secondary interventions. In our own clinical experience of Pittsburgh,

we looked at our explants. There were 13 down for infection, and of those nine had multiple secondary interventions which was 69%, a little bit of an outlier compared to the other studies. Once again, a relatively high mortality at one year. There's now a plethora of information in the literature

stating that secondary interventions may be a source for Bacteremia in seeding of your endovascular graft. And I think beyond just a secondary interventions, we know there's a wide range of risk factors. Perioperative contamination, break down in your sterile technique,

working in the radiology suite as opposed to the operating room. Wound complications to the access site. Hematogenous seeding, whether it's from UTIs, catheter related, or secondary interventions are possible.

Graft erosion, and then impaired immunity as well. So what I can tell you today, I think there is an association without question from secondary interventions and aortic endograft infection. Certainly the case I presented appears to show causation but there's not enough evidence to fully correlate the two.

So in summary, endograft infections are rare fortunately. However, the incidence does appear to be subtly rising. Secondary interventions following EVAR appear to be a risk factor for graft infection. Graft infections are associated without question

a high morbidity and mortality. I think it's of the utmost importance to maintain sterile technique, administer prophylactic antibiotics for all secondary endovascular catheter based interventions. Thank you.

- Thank you chairman, ladies and gentlemen, thanks for the organizing committee for the opportunity and the kind invitation. These are my disclosure regarding this topic. We know that several anatomic factors can be considered in order to identfy the challenging proximal aortic neck and and the risk of

Type one endoleak after EVAR. And we all agree that this is a condition that we would like to prevent after any of our standard EVAR repair. So we know that advance treatment we have illustrated and also with a chimney can be successful and prevent

such kind of complication, and today we do have another option that has already been presented it uses Heli-FX EndoAnchor in order to stabilize and fix the graft just at the level below the renal artery. This kind of approach can be used as a therapeutic approach

to solve proximal type one endoleak a different follow up interval after EVAR. But for sure the more interest is the application of this new technology of endosuturing is the prophylactic use to prevent any changes of the aortic proximal neck.

The advantages of using such kind of technique is mainly based on the possibility to maintain infrarenal sealing and to prevent any involvement of visceral vessels. Such not precluding any potential additional intervention like more complex like Ch-EVAR or f-EVAR.

What about the tips and tricks? As for any endovascular treatment any patient selection represents one of the most important aspect for each kind of treatment and we all know to respect that these kind of technology require a minimum length of the regular diameter

at the level of the renal artery. For sure the short neck is the one of the principle indication for the prophylactic use of EndoAnchors, you can see here that according to the instruction for use you can select patients with a neck less than 10 millimeter down to four millimeters.

Obviously angulated aortic neck but also wide neck which has been recently discussed as protective factor to prevent neck dilation during the follow up. Tapering of the proximal aortic neck is another good indication for the use of primary EndoAnchors with Heli-FX system, and you can see here that

also been reported to be an increased protective effect of EndoAnchors in patients treated with this approach in terms of sac regression. Obviously you have also to consider when not to use this solution because EndoAnchors does not create a new neck so you cannot include your patients with no neck

or a large amount of thrombus or calcium or large gap because as already discussed it prevents the penetration of the anchors into the aortic wall. Precise endo graph deployment at the level of the renal artery is of paramount importance if you approach short neck, if you lose

millimeters over there it doesn't really make sense to fix the graft into the unhealthy proximal aortic neck. And obviously when you think about the web deploy your EndoAnchor the more proximal part of the fabric of the extended graft is the ideal position in order to be sure to penetrate into the aortic neck.

And this another example you can see here the line very proximal in the first stent of the extended graft where you can deploy the EndoAnchors. If you lose any anchors during the repair is something that can happen after several number of EndoAnchors but you can manage,

you can recapture the EndoAnchors with the snare and remove without more complex distal complication and embolization. So finally if you approach a very challenging neck it is very important to increase the deployment procedure now you can do this kind of approach

with advance imaging software like in this case with the fusion. You cannot on the work station in the OR pre-plan where to deploy the EndoAnchors. You can see here for example a case with a six EndoAnchors so you can just fix on the pre-plan,

and then you fuse your image, you go live into the OR you have your target at the level of the renal artery and what you have to do is just center your target with your EndoAnchor delivery system. And obviously if you have also you can also scan and have an intraoperative control with then a CT

to be sure you're fixing the appropriate way with your case. So in conclusion, chairman, ladies and gentlemen. The endovascular fixation is effective in preventing proximal Type one endoleaks in selected patients with challenging neck anatomy. And obviously meticulous planning

and advanced intraoperative imaging are crucial for technical success. Thank you very much for your kind attention.

- Thank you very much for the opportunity to speak carbon dioxide angiography, which is one of my favorite topics and today I will like to talk to you about the value of CO2 angiography for abdominal and pelvic trauma and why and how to use carbon dioxide angiography with massive bleeding and when to supplement CO2 with iodinated contrast.

Disclosures, none. The value of CO2 angiography, what are the advantages perhaps? Carbon dioxide is non-allergic and non-nephrotoxic contrast agent, meaning CO2 is the only proven safe contrast in patients with a contrast allergy and the renal failure.

Carbon dioxide is very highly soluble (20 to 30 times more soluble than oxygen). It's very low viscosity, which is a very unique physical property that you can take advantage of it in doing angiography and CO2 is 1/400 iodinated contrast in viscosity.

Because of low viscosity, now we can use smaller catheter, like a micro-catheter, coaxially to the angiogram using end hole catheter. You do not need five hole catheter such as Pigtail. Also, because of low viscosity, you can detect bleeding much more efficiently.

It demonstrates to the aneurysm and arteriovenous fistula. The other interesting part of the CO2 when you inject in the vessel the CO2 basically refluxes back so you can see the more central vessel. In other words, when you inject contrast, you see only forward vessel, whereas when you inject CO2,

you do a pass with not only peripheral vessels and also see more central vessels. So basically you see the vessels around the lesions and you can use unlimited volumes of CO2 if you separate two to three minutes because CO2 is exhaled by the respirations

so basically you can inject large volumes particularly when you have long prolonged procedures, and most importantly, CO2 is very inexpensive. Where there are basically two methods that will deliver CO2. One is the plastic bag system which you basically fill up with a CO2 tank three times and then empty three times

and keep the fourth time and then you connect to the delivery system and basically closest inject for DSA. The other devices, the CO2mmander with the angio assist, which I saw in the booth outside. That's FDA approved for CO2 injections and is very convenient to use.

It's called CO2mmander. So, most of the CO2 angios can be done with end hole catheter. So basically you eliminate the need for pigtail. You can use any of these cobra catheters, shepherd hook and the Simmons.

If you look at this image in the Levitor study with vascular model, when you inject end hole catheter when the CO2 exits from the tip of catheter, it forms very homogenous bolus, displaces the blood because you're imaging the blood vessel by displacing blood with contrast is mixed with blood, therefore as CO2

travels distally it maintains the CO2 density whereas contrast dilutes and lose the densities. So we recommend end hole catheter. So that means you can do an arteriogram with end hole catheter and then do a select arteriogram. You don't need to replace the pigtail

for selective injection following your aortographies. Here's the basic techniques: Now when you do CO2 angiogram, trauma patient, abdominal/pelvic traumas, start with CO2 aortography. You'll be surprised, you'll see many of those bleeding on aortogram, and also you can repeat, if necessary,

with CO2 at the multiple different levels like, celiac, renal, or aortic bifurcation but be sure to inject below diaphragm. Do not go above diaphragm, for example, thoracic aorta coronary, and brachial, and the subclavian if you inject CO2, you'll have some serious problems.

So stay below the diaphragm as an arterial contrast. Selective injection iodinated contrast for a road map. We like to do super selective arteriogram for embolization et cetera. Then use a contrast to get anomalies. Super selective injection with iodinated contrast

before embolization if there's no bleeding then repeat with CO2 because of low viscocity and also explosion of the gas you will often see the bleeding. That makes it more comfortable before embolization. Here is a splenic trauma patient.

CO2 is injected into the aorta at the level of the celiac access. Now you see the extra vascularization from the low polar spleen, then you catheterize celiac access of the veins. You microcatheter in the distal splenic arteries

and inject the contrast. Oops, there's no bleeding. Make you very uncomfortable for embolizations. We always like to see the actual vascularization before place particle or coils. At that time you can inject CO2 and you can see

actual vascularization and make you more comfortable before embolization. You can inject CO2, the selective injection like in here in a patient with the splenic trauma. The celiac injection of CO2 shows the growth, laceration splenic with extra vascularization with the gas.

There's multiple small, little collection. We call this Starry Night by Van Gogh. That means malpighian marginal sinus with stagnation with the CO2 gives multiple globular appearance of the stars called Starry Night.

You can see the early filling of the portal vein because of disruption of the intrasplenic microvascular structures. Now you see the splenic vein. Normally, you shouldn't see splenic vein while following CO2 injections.

This is a case of the liver traumas. Because the liver is a little more anterior the celiac that is coming off of the anterior aspect of the aorta, therefore, CO2 likes to go there because of buoyancy so we take advantage of buoyancy. Now you see the rupture here in this liver

with following the aortic injections then you inject contrast in the celiac axis to get road map so you can travel through this torus anatomy for embolizations for the road map for with contrast. This patient with elaston loss

with ruptured venal arteries, massive bleeding from many renal rupture with retro peritoneal bleeding with CO2 and aortic injection and then you inject contrast into renal artery and coil embolization but I think the stent is very dangerous in a patient with elaston loss.

We want to really separate the renal artery. Then you're basically at the mercy of the bleeding. So we like a very soft coil but basically coil the entire renal arteries. That was done. - Thank you very much.

- Time is over already? - Yeah. - Oh, OK. Let's finish up. Arteriogram and we inject CO2 contrast twice. Here's the final conclusions.

CO2 is a valuable imaging modality for abdominal and pelvic trauma. Start with CO2 aortography, if indicated. Repeat injections at multiple levels below diaphragm and selective injection road map with contrast. The last advice fo

t air contamination during the CO2 angiograms. Thank you.

- Thank you, Ulrich. Before I begin my presentation, I'd like to thank Dr. Veith so kindly, for this invitation. These are my disclosures and my friends. I think everyone knows that the Zenith stent graft has a safe and durable results update 14 years. And I think it's also known that the Zenith stent graft

had such good shrinkage, compared to the other stent grafts. However, when we ask Japanese physicians about the image of Zenith stent graft, we always think of the demo version. This is because we had the original Zenith in for a long time. It was associated with frequent limb occlusion due to

the kinking of Z stent. That's why the Spiral Z stent graft came out with the helical configuration. When you compare the inner lumen of the stent graft, it's smooth, it doesn't have kink. However, when we look at the evidence, we don't see much positive studies in literature.

The only study we found was done by Stephan Haulon. He did the study inviting 50 consecutive triple A patients treated with Zenith LP and Spiral Z stent graft. And he did two cases using a two iliac stent and in six months, all Spiral Z limb were patent. On the other hand, when you look at the iliac arteries

in Asians, you probably have the toughest anatomy to perform EVARs and TEVARs because of the small diameter, calcification, and tortuosity. So this is the critical question that we had. How will a Spiral Z stent graft perform in Japanese EIA landing cases, which are probably the toughest cases?

And this is what we did. We did a multi-institutional prospective observational study for Zenith Spiral Z stent graft, deployed in EIA. We enrolled patients from June 2017 to November 2017. We targeted 50 cases. This was not an industry-sponsored study.

So we asked for friends to participate, and in the end, we had 24 hospitals from all over Japan participate in this trial. And the board collected 65 patients, a total of 74 limbs, and these are the results. This slide shows patient demographics. Mean age of 77,

80 percent were male, and mean triple A diameter was 52. And all these qualities are similar to other's reporting in these kinds of trials. And these are the operative details. The reason for EIA landing was, 60 percent had Common Iliac Artery Aneurysm.

12 percent had Hypogastric Artery Aneurysm. And 24 percent had inadequate CIA, meaning short CIA or CIA with thrombosis. Outside IFU was observed in 24.6 percent of patients. And because we did fermoral cutdowns, mean operative time was long, around three hours.

One thing to note is that we Japanese have high instance of Type IV at the final angio, and in our study we had 43 percent of Type IV endoleaks at the final angio. Other things to notice is that, out of 74 limbs, 11 limbs had bare metal stents placed at the end of the procedure.

All patients finished a six month follow-up. And this is the result. Only one stenosis required PTA, so the six months limb potency was 98.6 percent. Excellent. And this is the six month result again. Again the primary patency was excellent with 98.6 percent. We had two major adverse events.

One was a renal artery stenosis that required PTRS and one was renal stenosis that required PTA. For the Type IV index we also have a final angio. They all disappeared without any clinical effect. Also, the buttock claudication was absorbed in 24 percent of patients at one month, but decreased

to 9.5 percent at six months. There was no aneurysm sac growth and there was no mortality during the study period. So, this is my take home message, ladies and gentlemen. At six months, Zenith Spiral Z stent graft deployed in EIA was associated with excellent primary patency

and low rate of buttock claudication. So we have most of the patients finish a 12 month follow-up and we are expecting excellent results. And we are hoping to present this later this year. - [Host] Thank you.

- Thank you very much. Once again, thank you for the invitation. Last large chronic venous disease epidemiological study in Poland was done years ago, 2003, published by Arkadiusz Jawien and this was based on the 40,000 population of the patients visiting GPs.

This was the prevalence of the disease. 48% for female and 37% for male population. So this was the study concept background. The population changes, lifestyle changes also observed and we probably can also have some changes in the prevalence and the character

of the risk factors like obesity, physical activities. So it's perhaps time to update the knowledge concerning the emergence of the chronic venous disease. And that's why we presented ZEUS study. Zbroslawice, Epiedmiological Ultrasound Supported Study on the prevalence and risk factors

for the chronic venous disease and done in Poland. There is Poland, there is Zbroslawice. Small commune in the Silesia region with 1,500 people, the population. We randomly selected from the database of the commune of Zbroslawice 1,314 patients

and took these patients for exam between risk factor assessment, symptom assessment, sign evaluation on both extremities and also the clinical severity for classification CIVIQ. We know the patients and their ultrasounds were performed. The results is of the first 800 patients.

They're aged from 18 to 80 years. Similarly amount of female patients, median age of 53. And this is the year 2018 and the prevalence of chronic venous disease in Poland seems to be 68% of female population and 39% for male population concerning symptoms and/or signs of chronic venous disease.

This is also age-dependent but also in the population below 30, we can see that more than 40% of female population and 20% of male population suffer from this kind of disease. This is the highest c class reported in the group. So far it remains the highest class in 16% of females and 11% of males and C0s prevalence 4% in the study group.

This is the rate of the signs of chronic venous disease in general population with the prevalence of C1 lesions 62% in female population and 35 in male population. Concerning the general population, 32%, women 22%. Men is also dependent on the age of the patients growing up with the patient age together considering

both male and female population. Concerning the ultrasound studies, all the patients were studied. C1 presence in the patients with truncal/saphenous reflux was 41% and C1 presence in case of any reflux detected was almost 60%.

C2 presence and truncal/saphenous vein reflux, 69% and 11% of cases we found truncal/saphenous vein but without ostial incompetence. And concerning C3 pathology, more than half of these patients positive in terms of reflux present. Symptoms, as the symptoms were also evaluated,

in general population, symptomatic patients is more than half of female population and 30% of male population. In the group of patients with C1-C4, the classification a much higher rate was reported. More than 50% concerning all these symptoms investigated

and as you can see, the severity grows with the class C reported. Concerning venous clinical severity score, it's changing together with C class but also the age of the patient as reported on this slide. Looking for the risk factors,

we identified genetic predisposition and also one of the major and confirmed factors for the disease presence and also BMI especially in the patients in their 40s appears to be a a risk factor for varicose vein occurrence. Considering pregnancy importance in terms of C1 lesion, occurrence and also concerning varicose vein ratio

for pregnancy is 2.6. No relationship between working in sitting position and standing position and performance of sport activities. So conclusion, the prevalence is high and the number of symptomatic patients growing up in accordance to the age of the patient

and also the clinical severity. BMI presence and the number of pregnancies as well as genetic predispositions remains the major risk factors influencing on the disease occurrence. I would like to especially thank

the Zbroslawice Commune Council and this is my slide. If possible, and if you have time next year, I would like to invite you to CRACOW UIP meeting. Thank you very much.

- Good morning, thank you, Dr. Veith, for the invitation. My disclosures. So, renal artery anomalies, fairly rare. Renal ectopia and fusion, leading to horseshoe kidneys or pelvic kidneys, are fairly rare, in less than one percent of the population. Renal transplants, that is patients with existing

renal transplants who develop aneurysms, clearly these are patients who are 10 to 20 or more years beyond their initial transplantation, or maybe an increasing number of patients that are developing aneurysms and are treated. All of these involve a renal artery origin that is

near the aortic bifurcation or into the iliac arteries, making potential repair options limited. So this is a personal, clinical series, over an eight year span, when I was at the University of South Florida & Tampa, that's 18 patients, nine renal transplants, six congenital

pelvic kidneys, three horseshoe kidneys, with varied aorto-iliac aneurysmal pathologies, it leaves half of these patients have iliac artery pathologies on top of their aortic aneurysms, or in place of the making repair options fairly difficult. Over half of the patients had renal insufficiency

and renal protective maneuvers were used in all patients in this trial with those measures listed on the slide. All of these were elective cases, all were technically successful, with a fair amount of followup afterward. The reconstruction priorities or goals of the operation are to maintain blood flow to that atypical kidney,

except in circumstances where there were multiple renal arteries, and then a small accessory renal artery would be covered with a potential endovascular solution, and to exclude the aneurysms with adequate fixation lengths. So, in this experience, we were able, I was able to treat eight of the 18 patients with a fairly straightforward

endovascular solution, aorto-biiliac or aorto-aortic endografts. There were four patients all requiring open reconstructions without any obvious endovascular or hybrid options, but I'd like to focus on these hybrid options, several of these, an endohybrid approach using aorto-iliac

endografts, cross femoral bypass in some form of iliac embolization with an attempt to try to maintain flow to hypogastric arteries and maintain antegrade flow into that pelvic atypical renal artery, and a open hybrid approach where a renal artery can be transposed, and endografting a solution can be utilized.

The overall outcomes, fairly poor survival of these patients with a 50% survival at approximately two years, but there were no aortic related mortalities, all the renal artery reconstructions were patented last followup by Duplex or CT imaging. No aneurysms ruptures or aortic reinterventions or open

conversions were needed. So, focus specifically in a treatment algorithm, here in this complex group of patients, I think if the atypical renal artery comes off distal aorta, you have several treatment options. Most of these are going to be open, but if it is a small

accessory with multiple renal arteries, such as in certain cases of horseshoe kidneys, you may be able to get away with an endovascular approach with coverage of those small accessory arteries, an open hybrid approach which we utilized in a single case in the series with open transposition through a limited

incision from the distal aorta down to the distal iliac, and then actually a fenestrated endovascular repair of his complex aneurysm. Finally, an open approach, where direct aorto-ilio-femoral reconstruction with a bypass and reimplantation of that renal artery was done,

but in the patients with atypical renals off the iliac segment, I think you utilizing these endohybrid options can come up with some creative solutions, and utilize, if there is some common iliac occlusive disease or aneurysmal disease, you can maintain antegrade flow into these renal arteries from the pelvis

and utilize cross femoral bypass and contralateral occlusions. So, good options with AUIs, with an endohybrid approach in these difficult patients. Thank you.

- Thank you. Thank you Chairman, colleagues, thanks to the organizing committee to invite me. I have nothing to disclose with respect to this talk. So, lots have been written and talked about, volume outcome relationship in AAA. Why did we,

did another study? Well, so far we only have had registry data for Germany, and we wanted to have an analysis about the volume outcome relationship on a national level. It's also important to know that we have a decentralized healthcare system.

AAA's are treated in more than 500 hospitals. So we went, approached the Federal Bureau of Statistics of Germany to get access to the nationwide Diagnosis Related Group statistics between from 2005 to '13,

And we looked all at the ICD-10 codes for ruptured AAA, and non-ruptured AAA PLUS procedural codes for EVAR or open repair. We grouped the hospitals according to their annual volume, in quartiles. Quadrant 1, one to five, six through 14,

15 to 30 cases, and more than 30 cases a year, and the primary outcome was in-hospital mortality, and second degree outcomes, of course. So altogether, we were able to analyze more than 80,000 intact aneurysm operated on,

and almost 12,000 ruptured AAA's. The typical patient characteristic, aean age 72 years, female sex portion 12%, and no volume relationship for gender, age, or the co-morbidities, as depicted here. What we found is that the lengths of stay

for the elective cases was lower in the high-volume clinics. Most importantly, the raw data, and then the analysis of the multivariate analysis you see here, quartile one through four, that the, oops, that the raw data for in-hospital mortality

was significantly lower in the high-volume centers, and the same was true for elective EVAR. Then we looked up the ruptured cases, as I said, almost 12,000 cases, with an overall mortality of 43% for open repair and 27% for EVAR.

Again, highly statistically significant relationship in favor of high-volume centers, which was not able to detect for the EVAR, mainly due to not, to a lack of enough cases. And then we formed the multilevel multivariable analysis, adjusted for sex, age, et cetera,

and we found pretty much the same, where the risk increased as compared to the high-volume group of up to 60% in the low volume group, and pretty much the same result was found for the ruptured cases. Again, highly statistically significant relationship

in favor of high-volume clinics. The crucial question is, is there a threshold? So we did an analysis, where we looked at the continuous volume, and what you see here, this is the odds ratio of one,

so 50, obviously, is the minimum, we're talking about the whole aneurysm number, including elective and ruptured cases, so 50 is, but the lowest point here is actually 75, and again, almost the same identical result was found for the ruptured cases.

Finally, we looked at blood transfusion in intact and ruptured AAA. What you see here, that is that the whole amount of blood transfusions decreased in high-volume clinics, for intact, elective cases, but that was not the case for ruptured cases.

So, in conclusion, in-hospital mortality and complication rates following AAA repair are inversely associated with annual hospital volume in Germany. The use of blood products and the long length of stay are lower

in high volume hospitals, and a minimum annual case threshold for AAA procedures might improve the operative results. All the data published in the European Journal of Vascular Surgery this year. Thank you very much more your attention.

- Thank you. Thank you to the Veith for inviting me again for this meeting. So, we're going to deal about optimal treatment of asymptomatic patients with carotid stenosis. I have no financial disclosures. So, the first thing to say about the treatment

of each patient is intensive medical therapy and this has been discussed before. Smoking cessation, low-dose aspirin, statins to maximum tolerated dose, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor, and optimal blood pressure control.

Essentially, they are recommendation 1A. But, the adherence to medical therapy has never been evaluated in landmark RCTs and never evaluated for secondary prevention in patient with asymptomatic carotid stenosis. And you see here, in a study by Chen,

that among more than 1000 patient with vascular disease, range of adherence to guideline-recommended therapies at three month was not optimal. It was quite good for aspirin, lower for statins, and even lower for ACEIs. The other thing is that the recommendation for surgery

or any kind of revascularization in the asymptomatic patient with more than 60% carotid stenosis rely on ACAS and ACST trial that are fairly updated. And you see in this column, in the ACAS trial, the rate in the medical arm, the rate of stroke, ipsilateral stroke per year, 2.2%.

In 2004, in ACST first part, it was 1.1% per year, and then, in ACST year six to 10, published in 2010, it was 0.7%. So finally, we added, you know, significantly, the munition of the risk of stroke in the medical arm of nearly 60%.

And this is, in relation, we've arrived at the best medical therapy. Nothing must change for antiplatelet use, but still stable, around 90% of the patient, but you see a rise of antihypertensive drug from 50% to 90%,

and the dramatic rise of lipid-lowering drug from 10% to nearly 80%. And when you see this consequence in ACST-1, the net benefits of carotid endarterectomy were significant both for those on lipid-lowering therapy and for those not.

So, the main idea is that not all asymptomatic patient need a revascularization, but degree of stenosis is not all. In asymptomatic patients, risk of stroke seems for us to be more related to the structure of the plaque than to the degree of stenosis.

And you see, and so we suggest the following clinical and imaging features associated with an increased risk of stroke in these patients with asymptomatic carotid stenosis treated medically. Contralateral TIA stroke with odds ratio three,

cerebral imaging with ipsilateral silent brain infarct, ultrasound imaging with progression of stenosis, spontaneous embolization on TCD, large plaque, echolucent plaque, HITS on TCD plus echolucent plaque, and finally, an MRI intraplaque hemorrhage.

And it has been shown that asymptomatic patients with silent infraction have a higher risk of ipsilateral stroke, 3.6% versus 1%. On the same area, embolic signals on TCD in patient with asymptomatic carotid stenosis are associated with a higher risk of stroke.

So, we end with this recommendation. Carotid stenosis 60 to 99, life expectancy more than five years. One or more than one features that we described suggesting higher risk of stroke, and this is class IIa B.

Calculated B plus, best medical treatment, should be considered. We've a lower recommendation for CAS, maybe can consider it. No indication for string sign with occlusion or near occlusion. We flat out treated with best medical treatment only.

Just a word on carotid endarterectomy versus stenting in the asymptomatic patient. Due to a recent technique of CAS for the familiar approach in asymptomatic patient, CAS is associated with a significantly higher risk of stroke

and death rate at 30 days. So our recommendation is lower. So this recommendation were made by a group of people, 85 authors and reviewers agree with it, on these recommendations, and you can then well subscribe

in the European Journal of Vascular Surgery, or in the European Heart Journal. Thank you.

- Thanks Frank, for inviting me again. We know very well that CAS and CEA are, and will remain, emboli-generating. This is an algorithm in which we can see the microembolic profile during unprotected carotid stenting. But I am a vascular surgeon, oriented to an endovascular approach, and I believe strongly

in carotid artery stenting renaissance, when we use tips, tricks and new devices. So the real difference between the two procedures are between 0 and 30 days, and this is demonstrated by the result of 10 year by CREST and by ACT 1. So, but the procedure must be protected.

Because as the Kastrup metanalisys said, the unprotected procedure are three, four-fold increase for cerebral protection embolic. And these are the recommendations from European Society of Cardiology and American Heart Association, regarding

the use of embolic protection devices. But what kind of embolic protection device? We know very well that the cerebral distal protection have some strengths and some weaknesses. And the same is for the cerebral proximal protection with the strengths and weaknesses.

So, but this is rarely used, both in the rest of Europe and in Italy. But what about dissent? We are four studies with only prospective, including a population cohort larger than 100 patients. From Italy, from Germany, from Piotr Michalik,

from Poland, again from Italy. As these are the results that are near with the rod centered stent, with very satisfactory results. With very low rate of... This is the CLEAR-ROAD study, with very low rate of complication.

This is a total of 556 patients who underwent stenting with the new generation of stent. This is the incidence of adverse events at 30 days. So, how we can apply the benefit to our procedures with OCT? And OCT demonstrated the safety of new stent design. And why I use OCT in carotids?

With two main issues. A high definition of carotid plaque, and the correct interaction between plaque and stent. With the high definition of carotid dark in order to identify the plaque type. The degree and area of stenosis,

the presence of ulceration, and the thrombus. I study the interaction between plaque and stent. In order to study the stent apposition, the stent malapposition, the fibrous cap rupture, and the plaque micro-prolaps. So this data I published last year on

EuroIntervention, with the conclusion that in relation to the slice-based analysis, we have the correct comparison with conventional stents, and the incidence of plaque prolapse was absolutely lower. So in conclusion, why I strongly believe in a reinvigoration of carotid stenting?

For the use of better embolic protection device. For the use of newer mesh covered stents, and definitively, OCT proves it as shown. Thank you for your attention.

- Alright, thank you for asking me to speak. It's always worrisome when the interventional radiologist is talking about hematologic things, and I see some of the faces there that know probably a lot more about this me. There's not much literature written on this subject, with respect to vascular malformations.

Basically, the venous malformations particularly, originally thought to be a relatively benign phenomenon. But, Enjorlras and Mazoyer, I can't really see over there, did the first papers on this,

and they first noticed an association with purely venous malformations in a distinct hematologic syndrome that was different from Kasabach-Merritt syndrome. Now vascular malformations basically deal with Virchow's Triad,

and a venous malformation has a local environment that's very conducive to thrombosis. Basically you have altered blood flow with abnormal valveless vessels, relatively slow flow, and that leads to clotting. Similarly, I have endothelial injury,

which again leads to clotting. And this sets up a hypercoagulable viscous circle where you have increasing thrombosis and you can get localized intravascular coagulation. So in these original two papers back in '97 and 2002, they found that basically these patients had

episodes where they had a lot of bleeding during surgical procedures, and it led to lower levels of fibrinogen and increased degradation complex and they said a low platelet count, it was low-ish, but not abnormal.

And also leading to phlebolith formation and other bleeding complications peri-surgically. So what is LIC? Well we all know our coagulation pathway, the end of the cascade leading from fibrinogen to fibrin and what they've found is that with patients

who have LIC within a venous malformation, you can have elevated D-dimer levels. I won't get into the actual numbers. Suffice it to say, whatever your lab is, they're elevated. Fibrin degradation products are elevated. And then you can sometimes have low fibrinogen levels,

but it's important to realize that there's a normal PT, normal PTT, and normal platelet count in these patients. So how prevalent is this within this population? Well, in venous malformation in their original 1997 paper, it was very prevalent. 88% of patients had elevated D-dimers and

some had decreased fibrinogen and low-ish platelet counts. Again for the paper in 2002, you shouldn't expect to read that, but graphically I've got these, those little red lines increase how many more times normal the D-dimer levels were

and some of them were off the charts literally, and the other little set of little red dots over here are how many times less the fibrinogen levels were than what would be considered normal. So when it's present, it's really present. Now the thing is,

these are all the papers that actually talk about its prevalence that have ever been published. And each one of them, I'm just going to show you these sets of figures here, the important point to notice is that, sorry I'm going to go back, I apologize.

One second here. Is if you go through all of these, you'll see that incidence of localized intravascular coagulation is around 40 or 50 or even 60%, all things being considered equal. Now, what is the relationship between the incidence

of LIC and lesion characteristics? Well, this is a great paper from 2015 where they looked at 70 patients, and this is a great little diagram I like, is that if you look at just, they divvied up lesions from less than 250 CCs,

250 to 500, and then greater than 500, and looked at the incidence of LIC in their population. In the smaller lesion, there was hardly any, and if you look in the larger lesions, the patients who had LIC greatly outnumbered the ones that didn't.

So they also found that spongy lesions, and ones with phlebolith, as well as ones that were non-superficial, were the most likely to cause it. So why is LIC clinically relevant? Well, it causes pain, and over time, you can get lumps,

phleboliths within the lesion, and you can also have other thromboembolic complications as a result of it. But most important, it's relevant because LIC can proceed onto DIC, which is obviously a much more serious condition,

and the things that can stimulate that are trauma to the lesion, fracture, surgery, prolonged immobilization, menstruation, and pregnancy, and of course, sclerotherapy. So if you have a patient who suffers from LIC, messing with the lesion if they're vulnerable

can lead to DIC. So it's very important. And remember that DIC has all the components of LIC, but you have reduced platelet count and elevated PT and all other sorts of abnormalities, so it's the whole shebang.

Similarly too, when I was preparing for this talk, reading the hematologic literature, in addition to overt DIC, there's something between LIC and DIC, which they call non-overt DIC, so there's a spectrum. And there's all these different international criteria.

You don't want to get bogged down. But the meat and potatoes in the last three minutes of the talk here are when do we intervene clinically to address these hematologic issues, what parameters and what clinical setting are important,

and how do we stratify? Well, all patients with venous malformations, you're going to treat conservatively. Encourage activity, avoidance of activities that cause symptoms, and have compression garments. These can reduce the volume of the lesion

and make everybody feel better. They can decrease incidence of LIC symptoms and pain. We all know our heparin pathways, but the issue of heparin and anti-Xa therapy, looking at low molecular weight heparin, it's been found that when you give

low molecular weight heparin, in painful lesions the D-dimer levels drop precipitously. That's proven beyond a doubt. So what does that mean? Well, when should we use low molecular weight heparin? We assess risk.

All patients who have large sized, multi-focal lesions, venous ectasia or an overgrowth syndrome, or any kind of combined lesion should have a hematologic work up looking at the D-dimer, PT, PTT, fibrinogen, CBC. That's your first step.

If they don't have that, just conservative therapy, but if they do, and you're considering intervention, if you look at all of those risk factors, if they're negative for those risk factors, again conservative therapy, no low molecular weight heparin, compression garments.

But if they're positive, before you treat the venous malformation, either surgery or sclerotherapy, you give them half a milligram per kilogram of subcutaneous low molecular weight heparin, for one week before, look at the labs,

and give it another week. So basically, all literature says 10 to 14 days before you do something, give the goods. After therapy you give low molecular weight heparin too, and you pick the longest of two things. You either go for the same dose again

for two weeks after therapy, or until they're ambulatory, whatever is longest. So that's the most important slide. Chronic therapy, all venous malformations if you have these risk factors, if you have an elevated D-dimer

or if it's negative, go conservative. If it's positive, look at the fibrinogen level. If it's not elevated, go conservative. But if it is decreased, give low molecular weight heparin. Similarly, if your D-dimer level is elevated and you have pain,

give low molecular weight heparin. If not, conservative. A word on DOACs, direct oral anticoagulants. There's some early promise that if you look at this graph, this patient here received a DOAC instead of low molecular weight heparin,

and their fibrinogen levels bounced back up. We're radiologists here, pictures say everything. Here's a patient who was on low molecular weight heparin and their anti-Xa activity and all of their fibrinogen levels stayed the same. They were transitioned to dabigatran.

Everything stayed the same. So it does work. Final slide. Aspirin therapy, anecdotal evidence only. Vitamin K therapy's only anecdotal as well. But you certainly don't want to give aspirin

in the pediatric population, and we don't know if there's more trouble and complications and again, vitamin K may be a good thing, may be not. That's sort of the tour of hematologic issues in venous malformations.

Not that much literature. Bottom line is follow the rules for low molecular weight heparin. I think these talks are online afterwards so you can get all of the little data on there. Thank you.

Any questions? - [Audience Member] (mumbling). I was finding after treatment, they started getting bruises and things (mumbling). A lot of these patients are positive D-dimers, low fibrinogens, and low platelets.

It's not unusual for us to treat (mumbling) foot malformation over several days. You can send them (mumbling). So anybody that's got a large malformation (mumbling) all these things to know ahead of time (mumbling) to improve the situation (mumbling).

They were there, did an angiogram (mumbling). Four inch hole. We almost lost this guy. 35 years old. This is a real event. How in the hell, killed by a four inch catheter.

He would have been DIC if we pulled (mumbling). - [Gerald] I think I've been whistling past the graveyard for years until recently, but you always hear these horror stories. (audience member mumbling) Yeah, exactly.

- [Audience Member] Gerald, what's the relationship between pain and the administration of low molecular weight heparin in some of these larger lesions? - [Gerald] It does decrease it. The literature shows they do get better.

It's the only thing proven in the several studies to make a difference. - [Audience Member] And in your experience, and that of others, has there been a dramatic decrease in pain, elimination of pain? Let's say you have a large painful lesion,

they haven't responded to conventional NSAIDs or conventional therapy, do you see any dramatic, or has anybody seem dramatic benefits in terms of pain reduction with low molecular weight heparin administration? (audience member mumbling)

Yeah, I understand. - [Gerald] But with oral (mumbling), the early literature coming up, but I bet you're going to see that's fertile ground to randomize between two groups and look at their visual analogs.

- [Audience Member] Because remember, the pain is the biggest issue. - [Gerald] Absolutely, it's not the lesion. - [Audience Member] But it depend of the cause of the pain. If the pain is really due to local thrombosis, it's very acute pain that will go away with

the low molecular weight heparin. If the pain is due to functional limitation, due to the extension of the VM, it will not help. - [Audience Member] Yeah but we also have patients who just have a painful lesion. It's not necessarily functional.

The thing hurts like hell and the question is, in those patients, obviously we treat them, but in those patients administration of low molecular weight heparin, can that reduce the pain? - [Audience Member] It depend on the biology. If they have very high D-dimer with

normal or normal low fibrinogen, I would think it would help, but if the coagulation is normal, it would not. - [Gerald] Yeah I think (mumbling) good for preventing acute episodes of pain and definitely better for painful episodes.

I agree with you, yes. - [Audience Member] Thank you. - [Audience Member] You've got to ask the patient is it a burning pain or is it a sharp pain? Burning pain is reflexive (mumbling). So you really have to ask (mumbling).

- [Audience Member] Maybe one last comment. We've been using at the beginning, 10 days before like you just said, but we realized that if the fibrinogen is normal, you can start just the day before. It's enough.

If the fibrinogen is low, then we usually send it at least one month before to the hematologist and usually give it until the fibrinogen is normalized before the sclerotherapy which take one to two months. - [Audience Member] Alright.

- [Audience Member] Thank you. Very important topic. - [Audience Member] Yes, very interesting topic and I think we learned a lot.

- (speaks French) liver surgeon I perform hepatobiliary surgery and liver transplantation. Maybe I don't belong here, I so probably more rested than anybody in the room here. But today I will present about liver surgery and hepatectomy. I work at The Royal Free where I have the honor and pleasure to have seen Krassi. We are in the

little island in the North Sea. There is many things going wrong there including Brexit but, the guys uh, we have a major advantage. The NHS favors centralization. Centralization look there: London is bigger than New York Uh, eight million, 50 million greater London

and we drain about six millions of people with our HPB center. In the center we perform about 2,000 operations, of major surgery. In five years, half of them are liver surgery. And most of them have uh, benign, malignant tumor. A very small percentage have benign tumor.

I count here for complications uh, and mortality look there, 3.1% of only the malignant because the benign are young people and we perform a different strategy, they have no mortality. Today Hepatic Hemangioma, look there it is uh, 1898 is a key year. Not only the first description

of the lady that died after bleeding out in an autopsy but also, Hermann Pfannenstiel uh, Professor Pfannenstiel. I will introduce you to him. He described the first operation. Now, we're talking of congenital malformations, they uh, lesions occur in the liver and they may grow,

but only 20% they grow. They have a chaotic network of vessels and they have fibrotic, fibrotic development within it. I introduce you Hermann Pfannenstiel, he was a gynecologist, famous, famous, important incision that we still use today.

Remember him, we'll talk to him later. Microscopically, the microscopic is our well-circumscribed lesion, they're compressible. Important you see down there that they compress the liver that is normal close to it. This has an implication because if you operate,

you fill find a blood duct or a vessel and it will bleed or leak by. Microscopically, they are ectatic blood vessels and they are fed by arteries. This is also an important point, for therapy. Separated by fibrous septa, this is also important

because they become harder and they become bigger. And they have distorted blood vessels. They're more frequent uh, benign tumor. Prevalence up to 7%, they have non-neoplastic this must be clear, they are non-cancer. The proliferation of endothelial cells, women

have more and particularly pregnant women, more pregnancy or contraceptive. We divide them in cavernous and capillary and we'll have a word on that. Symptomatic being half of the cases, multiple in 10%, they rarely bleed and they rarely rupture.

Capillary Hemangiomas cells small, I show you an MRI here. The differential with HCC liver cancer is most important. They both are theorized but they continue to appear on late face. They are asymptomatic please, do not touch them, they do no harm.

And so we will not speak of them. We speak only of the cavernous hemangioma. And here, the cavernous hemangioma bleeds Oh my God, no, it's not true. There are 83 reports of bleeding since the report of Hermann Pfannenstiel. Uh, 97 cases, adenomas bleed more frequently.

Frequently, in the past they were confused. Hemangioma and adenoma, adenoma does bleed. There are only true cases, 46 in the literature. Size is not important and they are very rare in elderly people.

This is what we see when they are giant cavernous hemangiomas, they're serious, they are rather easy to diagnose. Diagnostic criteria, uh, look up typical for uh, cavernous hemangioma. How do you point here? Yep, you stop. If you then see that you have

an atypical hemangioma, you jump over to an MRI. MRI is too nowadays, diagnostic and uh, the important thing is you stop. Once you have the diagnosis with MRI, you stop, do nothing yet, do not follow, bye-bye. Treatment modalities surgery: Selective TAE, Radiotherapy, Medication: two classes,

Propranolol, to decrease the hyper circulation. Bevacizumab as a class of drugs of inhibitors of inferior growths and endories, eventually are cold. This is seminal paper, about 35 years ago "Do not treat asymptomatic patients." This is a key: do not bother with hemangioma.

If you do have the algorithm, you look at complaints that can present incidentally when they have complained, not complained, no treatment of abdominal pain. Unrelated to no treatment, we have to eventually make sure that the pain is not related to the cavernous hemangioma. If there is other futures

like compression giant, you can do surgery. If you have a doubt in diagnosis, today rare with MRI, then you can perform a biopsy. The surgical indication then remain progress, severe, disabling symptoms. Diagnostic uncertainty nowadays not the case, with MRI.

Consumptive coagulopathy or Kasabach-Merritt syndrome is a serious, we will see when you perform human transplants. Spontaneous rupture with bleeding as an emergency. Rapid growth in 25%. This is a paper that shows that the size of the cavernous hemangioma is here,

and you can see that operation has been performed for larger size, however, look that even in non-symptomatic or partially asymptomatic patients, you can reach sizes up to 15 centimeters. And this a review of the literature from a Chinese group where they revised a thousand to a hundred cases,

no mortality in the series and enucleation versus the anatomic resection is better. Less complications, less blood less, less time of surgery, and less hospital stay. So please, in this case of surgery, we do enucleation. I was asked by my society the HPBA to speak

about transplantation for liver tumor. You can that an indication is unresectable disease, severe symptoms and mass occupying effects. Pre-cancerous behavior is not for hemangioma only for adenoma differential diagnosis with HCC. And you have to be attentive that you avoid

liver insufficiency during your resection. So, in conclusion, for benign lesions, hemangioma technically is the only indication. And now the systematic review that shows around several emothing United States UNOS and the ELTR Several, several benign tumors but if you break down

for type of tumors you see that most of them are Polycystic disease or partly cavernous hemangioma are very low. 77 in Europe, out of 97,000 operation of transplantation. So, let's get an old paper. The pioneer of transplantation again, extremely low,

one out of 3,200. An extremely low percentage. It's my personal experience I was working at Essen, Germany. Almost a thousand transplants we performed. Unfortunately most of them I did and we never transplanted one hemangioma, my experience for transplantation is zero because it should not be done.

So, my advice for hemangioma. Biopsy not advised, see a liver surgeon in a serious center, diagnosis is done my MRI, observe doubt symptoms and observe. Let the patient beg you for surgery, if significant increase in size and symptoms, we can do surgery. Embolization is possible.

Sometimes it's harmful. The role of the surgeon is to confirm the diagnosis, differentiate it from cancer, exclude causes of other symptoms and avoid unnecessary surgery that's the main thing. Surgery for severe symptoms of Kasabach-Merritt. Only for complicated symptomatic lesions, or where the

diagnosis is uncertain. Ladies and gentleman, I will conclude with a couple of questions. If you have a daughter or son with a liver tumor, would you go to a center or a competent surgeon or to a gynecologist. Professor Pfannenstiel for instance or another doctor. If your car has a problem,

would you go to a good mechanic once for all, or to a small shop for 20-40 times. It is a matter of experience and a matter of costs. And with this, I am ready for your questions. - [Audience Member #1] When have you personally operated on these lesions?

- [Speaker] I am. And the experience that I have in the past I seemed young but I practiced for many years. When I started 25-30 years ago, we were operating many of these because we were not so certain. Then MRI came, and MRI basically made the diagnosis so easy and straight-forward and we started observing

patients. We still do operate today, but they are very large tumors and when I do personally, I avoid the androbolization before because you have more skylotec reaction, just (grainy sound effect) to peel it away from the normal parenchymal.

This is our experience. - [Audience] Thank you. - [Speaker] Thank you very much, yes? - [Audience Member #2] Yes, one question. When you operate, and with all of the experience you have, what are the complications of

(mumbles) - [Speaker] The main, so first of all, there has been also an evolution in the type of operation we don't do anymore the resections where you have some bi-leaks. If you operate correctly, it's bleeding and one infection not one born. If you have to watch bi-leak is the one

that you have to watch and that's because the tissue is pushed away and you may miss something during the enucleation.

- Thank you, good morning everybody. Thank you for the kind invitation, Professor Veith, it's an honor for me to be here again this year in New York. I will concentrate my talk about the technical issues and the experience in the data we have already published about the MISACE in more than 50 patients.

So I have no disclosure regarded to this topic. As you already heard, the MISACE means the occlusion of the main stem of several segmental arteries to preserve the capability of the collateral network to build new arteries. And as a result, we developed

the ischemic preconditioning of the spinal cord. Why is this so useful? Because it's an entirely endovascular first stage of a staged approach to treat thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm in order to reduce the ischemic spinal cord injury.

How do you perform the MISACE? Basically, we perform the procedure in local anesthesia, through a percutaneous trans-femoral access using a small-bore sheath. The patient is awake, that means has no cerebrospinal fluid damage

so we can monitor the patient's neurological for at least 48 hours after the procedure. So, after the puncture of the common femoral artery, using a technique of "tower of power" in order to cannulate the segmental arteries. As you can see here, we started with a guiding catheter,

then we place a diagnosis catheter and inside, a microcatheter that is placed inside the segmental artery. Then we started occlusion of the ostial segment of the segmental artery. We use coils or vascular plugs.

We don't recommend the use of fluids due to the possible distal embolization and the consequences. Since we have started this procedure, we have gained a lot of experience and we have started to ask,

what is a sufficient coilembolization? As you can see here, this artery, we can see densely packed coils inside, but you can see still blood flowing after the coil. So, was it always occluding, or is it spontaneous revascularization?

That, we do not know yet. The question, is it flow reduction enough to have a ischemic precondition of the spinal cord? Another example here, you can see a densely packed coil in the segmental artery at the thoracic level. There are some other published data

with some coils in the segm the question is, which technique should we use, the first one, the second one? Another question, is which kind of coil to use? For the moment, we can only use the standard coils

in our center, but I think if we have 3-D or volume coils or if you have microvascular plugs that are very compatible with the microcatheter, we have a superior packing density, we can achieve a better occlusion of the segmental artery, and we have less procedure time and radiation time,

but we have to think of the cost. We recommend to start embolization of the segmental artery, of course, at the origin of it, and not too far inside. Here, you can see a patient where we have coiled a segmental artery very shortly after the ostium,

but you can see here also the development of the collaterals just shortly before the coils, leading to the perfusion of segmental artery that was above it. As you can see, we still have a lot of open question. Is it every patent segmental artery

a necessary to coil? Should we coil only the large ones? I show you an example here, you can see this segmental artery with a high-grade stenotic twisted ostium due to aortic enlargement.

I can show you this segmental artery, six weeks after coiling of a segmental artery lower, and you can see that the ostium, it's no more stenotic and you can see also the connection between the segmental artery below to the initial segmental artery.

Another question that we have, at which level should we start the MISACE? Here, can see a patient with a post-dissection aneurysm after pedicle technique, so these are all uncovered dissection stent, and you can see very nicely the anterior spinal artery

feeded by the anterior radiculomedullary artery from the segmental artery. So, in this patient, in fact, we start the coiling exactly at the seat of this level, we start to coil the segmental artery that feeds the anterior spinal artery.

So, normally we find this artery of the Th 9 L1, and you can see here we go upwards and downwards. We have some challenges with aneurysm sac enlargement, in this case, we use this technique to open the angle of the catheter, we can use also deflectable steerable sheath

in order to reach the segmental artery. And you can see here our results, again, I just will go fast through those, we have treated 57 patients, most of them were Type II, Type III aortic aneurysms. We have found in median nine patent segmental artery

at the level of the aorta to be treated, between 2 and 26, and we have coiled in multiple sessions with a mean interval of 60 days between the sessions. No sooner than seven days we perform the complete exclusion of the aneurysm

in order to let the collateral to develop, and you can see our result: at 30 days we had no spinal cord ischemia. So I can conclude that our first experience suggest that MISACE is feasible, safe, and effective, but segmental artery coiling in thoracoabdominal aneurysm

can be challenging, it's a new field with many open questions, and I looking forward for the results with PAPA_ARTiS study. Thank you a lot.

- Yeah now, I'm talking about another kind of vessel preparation device, which is dedicated to prevent the occurrence of embolic events and with these complications. That's a very typical appearance of an occluded stent with appositional stent thrombosis up to the femur bifurcation.

If you treat such a lesion simply with balloon angioplasty, you will frequently see some embolic debris going downstream, residing in this total occlusion of the distal pocket heel artery as a result of an embolus, which is fixed at the bifurcation of

the anterior tibial and the tibial planar trunk, what you can see over here. So rates of macro embolization have been described as high as 38% after femoral popliteal angioplasty. It can be associated with limb loss.

There is a risk of limb loss may be higher in patients suffering from poor run-off and critical limb ischemia. There is a higher rate of embolization for in-stent restenosis, in particular, in occluded stents and chronic total occlusions.

There is a higher rate of cause and longer lesions. This is the Vanguard IEP system. It's an integrated balloon angioplasty and embolic protection device. You can see over here, the handle. There is a rotational knob, where you can,

a top knob where you can deploy, and recapture the filter. This is the balloon, which is coming into diameters and three different lengths. This is the filter, 60 millimeter in length. The pore size is 150 micron,

which is sufficient enough to capture relevant debris going downstream. The device is running over an 80,000 or 14,000 guide-wire. This is a short animation about how the device does work. It's basically like a traditional balloon.

So first of all, we have to cross the lesion with a guide-wire. After that, the device can be inserted. It's not necessary to pre-dilate the lesion due to the lower profile of the capture balloon. So first of all, the capture filter,

the filter is exposed to the vessel wall. Then you perform your pre-dilatation or your dilatation. You have to wait a couple of second until the full deflation of the balloon, and then you recapture the filter, and remove the embolic debris.

So when to use it? Well, at higher risk for embolization, I already mentioned, which kind of lesions are at risk and at higher risk of clinical consequences that should come if embolization will occur. Here visible thrombus, acute limb ischemia,

chronic total occlusion, ulceration and calcification, large plaque volume and in-stent reocclusion of course. The ENTRAP Study was just recently finished. Regarding enrollment, more than 100 patients had been enrolled. I will share with you now the results

of an interim analysis of the first 50 patients. It's a prospective multi-center, non-randomized single-arm study with 30-day safety, and acute performance follow-up. The objective was to provide post-market data in the European Union to provide support for FDA clearance.

This is the balloon as you have seen already. It's coming in five and six millimeter diameter, and in lengths of 80, 120 and 200 millimeters. This is now the primary safety end point at 30 days. 53 subjects had been enrolled. There was no event.

So the safety composite end point was reached in 100%. The device success was also 100%. So all those lesions that had been intended to be treated could be approached with the device. The device could be removed successfully. This is a case example with short lesion

of the distal SFA. This is the device in place. That's the result after intervention. That's the debris which was captured inside the filter. Some more case examples of more massive debris captured in the tip of the filter,

in particular, in longer distance total occlusions. Even if this is not a total occlusion, you may see later on that in this diffused long distance SFA lesion, significant debris was captured. Considering the size of this embolus,

if this would have been a patient under CLI conditions with a single runoff vessel, this would have potentially harmed the patient. Thank you very much.

- Thank you very much again. Thank you very much for the kind invitation. The answer to the question is, yes or no. Well, basically when we're talking about pelvic reflux, we're talking really, about, possibly thinking about two separate entities. One symptoms relate to the pelvis

and issues with lower limb varicose veins. Really some time ago, we highlighted in a review, various symptoms that may be associated with the pelvic congestion syndrome. This is often, either misdiagnosed or undiagnosed. The patients we see have had multiple investigations

prior to treatment. I'm not really going to dwell on the anatomy but, just really highlight to you it is incompetence in either the renal pelvic and ovarian veins. What about the patterns of reflux we've heard from both Mark and Nicos what the pattern are

but, basically if you look a little more closely you can see that not only the left ovarian vein is probably effected in a round-about 60%. But, there is incompetence in many of the other veins. What does this actually have implication for with respect to treatment.

Implications are that you probably, if you only treat an isolated vein. There is a suggestion, that the long term outcomes are not actually as good. Now this is some work from Mark Whiteley's group because, we've heard about the diagnosis

but, there is some discussion as to whether just looking at ovarian vein diameter is efficient and certainly the Whiteley group suggests that actually diameter is relatively irrelevant in deciding as to whether there is incompetence in the actual vein itself.

That diameter should not be used as a single indicator. You may all well be aware, that there are reporting standards for the treatment of pelvic venous insufficiency and this has been high-lighted in this paper. What of the resuts, of pelvic embolization and coiling? The main standard is used, is a visual analog scale

when you're looking at pelvic symptoms to decide what the outcome may be. This is a very nice example of an article that was... A review that was done in Niel Khilnani's group and you can see if you look at the pre

and post procedural visual analog scales there is some significant improvement. You can see that this is out at one year in the whole. Now, this is a further table from the paper. Showing you their either, there's a mixture

of glue, coils, scleroses and foam. The comments are that, there are significant relief and some papers suggest its after 100% and others up to 80%. If you look at this very nice review that Mark Meissner did with Kathy Gibson,

you will see that actually no improvement in worse. There's quite a range there for those patients 53% of patients in one study, had no improvement or the symptoms were potentially worse. We know that those patients who have coil embolization will have reoccurrence of symptomatology

and incompetence up to about a quarter of the patients. What about varicose veins? The answer is there is undoubtedly evidence to suggest that there is physiological/anatomical incompetence in some of the pelvic veins in patients

who have recurrent varicose veins. Whether this is actually a direct cause or an association, I think it's something we need to have some further consideration of. As you know, there are many people who now would advicate actually treating

the pelvic veins prior to treating the leg veins. You can maybe discuss that in the question time. If we then look at a comparative trial. Comparing coils and plugs, you can see over all there really isn't no particular difference. If we then look again to highlight this,

which comes again from the Whiteley group. You can see that 20% of patients will have some primary incompetence but, it'll go up to around 30% if they are re-current. There is no randomized control data looking at this. What are the problems with coils?

Actually, a bit like (mumbling) you can find them anywhere. You can find them in the chest and also you can find that there are patients now who are allergic to nickel and the very bottom corner is a patient who's coils I took out by open laparotomy because they were allergic to nickel.

So, ladies and gentlemen I would suggest to you certainly, for continuing with pelvic embolization when doubtedly it needs some more RCT data and some much better registry data to look where we're going. Thank you very much.

- Thank you, ladies and gentlemen. And our faculty here. Thank you so much for having me, and I'm thrilled to be here as I think some of the few interventionalists who are here. So, the idea was, what is the, is the stance

being overused after the Orbita Trial? And I bring it up because what is the Orbita Trial? This was a trial that really got a lot of, a lot of attention and I think it's important for you to kind of think about it.

It was actually the very first sham-controlled study of 230 patients who were enrolled, 200 who were randomized. Comparing actually PCI to placebo in patients with severe single vessel disease who were medically optimized but were stable.

Very, very interesting. They followed up these patients and the, based, looked at the change in exercise time in these patients and found absolutely no benefit for PCI in changing the exercise time.

So they said, in medically, in patients with medically-treated angina and severe coronary artery stenosis, PCI did not increase exercise time by by, in any difference from placebos. So, this really, really brought up so much attention

and that we were really, really doing unnecessary procedures and the last thing we heard is the last nail in the coffin of PCI. And so, I think it's important to think about what were the issues with that important disease and where we are with the scope of coronary disease.

Which is not insignificant. At the moment, with 326 million patients in the United States, and prevalence of CAD at 16.5, PCI is being performed in 667,000 patients per year. And I think it is important to note

that for the most part, about 50% of this is for acute coronary syndromes, which is not all the Orbita Trial. It's supportive evidence for routine revascularization with guideline-based therapy, directive therapy.

Very, very important that observational data does show a very important relationship between ischemia and death and MI. Revascularization relieves ischemia and that is what it's supposed to do. Large scale studies have shown

a reduction in spontaneous MI, following revascularization versus guideline-directed therapy. And importantly, continued improvement in both PCI and CABG techniques have really shown excellent relief of symptoms

and that we are not here to really, really think about death and MI in the big, big picture. But more immediate reductions as preferred by patients and importantly, we have to note that ischemia directed therapy with revascularization can have important issues.

Regarding whether or not there is an overuse of PCI's, let me just take a, show you the map of the United States. The heat map. The hotter, the more PCI's. And you can see, it really is very much variable and that there is important appropriate use criteria

for coronary revascularization that continues to be updated on a very, very important issue. And there's no question that the media loves the hysteria about overuse of PCI. But I wanted to put that into the context

of what we were doing. In PCI, we are using FFR guidance and physiology guided PCI to show an enhanced outcome. And more and more, we're incorporating that into the armamentarium of both AUC, Appropriate-Use Criteria, as well as evaluating

the valuable patients. And it is important for you to take a look at what have we shown. So far, based on revascularization versus optimal medical therapy in relieving angina and has been a very, very important

improvement in exercise capacity. Albeit, that the one and only trial of the sham procedure didn't show a change in exercise, but there are a lot of issues in this underpowered study that shouldn't really, really turn you away.

For the fact that PCI does relive symptoms. Because there's a tremendous amount of evidence in, in view of reducing angina with a really, really good p value of 12 randomized clinical trials in this area. It is also important that the freedom of angina is shown.

Not just within the Orbita Trial that actually did show a reduction in angina, but very similar to previous studies. And the guidelines are telling us a very, very important Class 1A indication for patients with CID for both

prognosis and treatment. There is an upcoming ischemia trial in ischemic heart disease that will show in 8,000 patients on their NHLBI, with evidence of ischemia hopefully that we could show

that there is benefits. So to conclude, the current guidelines recommend use of revascularization for relief of symptoms with patients with ischemic, a stable ischemic disease. And while placebo remains an important aspect of this medical management up front,

and making sure that there is an important management, we should really, really understand that there's no question that optimal medical therapy has to stay in the background. And the use of PCI is, continues to be of important value.

Thank you for your attention.

- [Professor Veith] Laura, Welcome. - Thank you Professor Veith, thank you to everybody and good morning. It's a great pleasure, to have the possibility to present the result of this randomized trial we performed near Rome in Italy.

Risk of CAS-related embolism was maximal during the first phases of the second procedure, the filter positioning predilation and deployment and post dilatation. But it continues over time with nithinol expansion so that we have an interaction between the stent struts

and the plaque that can last up to 28 or 30 days that is the so called plaque healing period. This is why over time different technique and devices have been developed in order to keep to a minimum the rate of perioperative neurological embolization.

This is why we have, nowadays, membrane-covered stent or mesh-covered stent. But a question we have to answer, in our days are, "are mesh covered stents able to capture every kind of embolism?" Even the off-table one.

This is why they have been designed. That is to say the embolism that occurs after the patient has left the operating room. This is why we started this randomized trial with the aim of comparing the rate of off-table subclinical neurological events

in two groups of patients submitted to CAS with CGuard or WALLSTENT and distal embolic protection device in all of them. We enrolled patient affected by asymptomatic carotid stenosis more than 70% and no previous brain ischemic lesion

detected at preoperative DW-MRI. The primary outcome was the rate of perioperative up to 72 hour post peri operatively in neurological ischemic events detected by DW-MRI in the two CAS group. And secondary outcome measure were the rise of (mumbles)

neuro biomarker as one on the better protein in NSE and the variation in post procedural mini mental state examination test in MoCA test score We enrolled 29 patients for each treatment group. The study protocol was composed by a preoperative DW-MRI and neuro psychometrics test assessment

and the assessment of blood levels of this two neuro biomarkers. Then, after the CAS procedure, we performed an immediate postoperative DW-MRI, we collect this sample up to 48 hours post operatively to assess the level of the neuro biomarkers

then assess 72 hour postoperatively we perform a new DW-MRI and a new assessment of neuro psychometric tests. 58 patient were randomized 29 per group. And we found one minor stroke in the CGuard group together with eight clinically silent lesion detected at 72 hours DW-MRI.

Seven patient presented in WALLSTENT group silent 72 DW-MRI lesion were no difference between the two groups but interestingly two patients presented immediately postoperatively DW-MRI lesions. Those lesion were no more detectable at 72 hours

this give doubts to what we are going to see with DW-MRI. When analyzing the side of the lesion, we found four ipsilateral lesion in the CGuard patient and four contra or bilateral lesion in this group while four ipsilateral were encountered in WALLSTENT patient and three contra or bilateral lesion

in the WALLSTENT group were no difference between the two groups. And as for the diameter of the lesion, there were incomparable in the two groups but more than five lesion were found in five CGuard patients, three WALLSTENT patient

with no significant difference within the two groups. A rise doubled of S1 of the better protein was observed at 48 hours in 24 patients, 12 of them presenting new DW-MRI lesions. And this was statistically significant when comparing the 48 level with the bars of one.

When comparing results between the two groups for the tests, we found for pre and post for MMSE and MoCA test no significant difference even if WALLSTENT patients presented better MoCA test post operatively and no significant difference for the postoperative score for both the neuro psychometric test between the two groups.

But when splitting patients not according to the treatment group but according to the presence of more or less than 5 lesion at DW-MRI, we found a significant difference in the postoperative score for both MMSE and MoCA test between both group pf patients.

To conclude, WALLSTENT and CGuard stent showed that not significant differences in micro embolism rate or micro emboli number at 72 postoperative hours DW-MRI, in our experience. 72 hour DW-MMRI lesion were associated to an increase in neuro biomarkers

and more than five lesion were significantly associated to a decrease in neuro psychometric postoperative score in both stent groups. But a not negligible number of bilateral or contralateral lesions were detected in both stent groups This is very important.

This is why, probably, (mumbles) are right when they show us what really happened into the arch when we perform a transfer more CAS and this is why, maybe,

the future can be to completely avoid the arch. I thank you for your attention.

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