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TIPS Case | Extreme IR
TIPS Case | Extreme IR
antibioticsascitesbacteriabilebiliarycatheterchapterclotcolleaguescommunicationcovereddemonstrateddrainageductduodenal stent placementfull videoportalrefractoryshuntsystemthrombolysistipstunnelultrasoundunderwentvein
Lessons Learned | Extreme IR
Lessons Learned | Extreme IR
algorithmsbacteremiabiliarychaptermultidisciplinarypatienttips
Transcript

thank you so much for inviting me and to speak at this session so I'm gonna share with you a save a disaster and a save hopefully my disclosures which aren't related so this is a 59 year old female she's lovely with a history of locally advanced pancreatic cancer back in 2016

and and she presented with biliary and gastric outlet obstructions so she underwent scenting so there was a free communication of the biliary system with the GI system she underwent chemo and radiation and actually did really well

and she presents to her local doctor in 2018 with ascites they tap the ascites that's benign and they'll do a workup and she just also happens to have n stage liver disease and cirrhosis due to alcohol abuse in her life so just very

unlucky very unfortunate and the request comes and it's for a paracentesis which you know pretty you know standard she has refractory ascites and because she has refractory ascites tips and this is a problem because the pointer doesn't

work because a her biliary system is in communication with the GI system right so there's lots of bugs sitting in the bile ducts because of all these stents that have opened up the bile duct to list to the duodenum and so you know

like any good individual I usually ask my colleagues you know there's way more smart people in the world than me and and and so I say well what should I do and and you know there was a very loud voice that said do not do a tips you

know there there's no way you should do a tips in this person maybe just put in a tunnel at drainage catheter and then there was well maybe you should do a tips but if you do a tips don't use a Viator don't use a covered stand use a

wall stunt a non-covered stunt because you could have the bacteria that live in the GI tract get on the the PTFE and and you get tip situs which is a disaster and then there was someone who said well you should do a bowel prep you

like make her life miserable and you know give her lots of antibiotics and then you should do a tips and then it's like well what kind of tips and they're like I don't know maybe you should do a covered said no not a covered tonight

and then they're you know and then there was there was a other voice that said just do a tips you know just do the damn tips and go for it so I did it would you know very nice anatomy tips was placed she did well

the next day she has fevers and and her blood cultures come back positive right and you can see in the circle that there's a little bit of low density around the tips in the liver and so they put her on IV antibiotics and then they

got an ultrasound a week later and the tips that occluded and then they got a CT just to prove that the ultrasound actually worked so this really hurt my gosh to rub it in just to rub it in just just to confirm that your tips occlude

it and so you know I feel not so great about myself and particularly because I work in an institution that defined tip seclusion was one of the first people so gene Laberge is one of my colleagues back in the day demonstrated Y tips

occludes and one of the reasons is because it's in communication with the biliary system so bile is very toxic actually and when it gets into the the lining of the tips it causes a thrombosis and when they would go and

open these up they would see green mile or biome components in the in the thrombus so I felt particularly bad and so and then I went back and I looked and I was like you know what the tips is short but it's not short in the way that

it usually is usually it's short at the top and they people don't extend it to the to the outflow of the hepatic vein here I hadn't extended it fully in and it was probably in communication with a bile duct which was also you know living

with lots of bacteria which is why she got you know bacteremia so just because we want to do more imaging cuz you know god forbid you know you got the ultrasound of her they because she was back to remake and

you know that and potentially subject they got an echo just to make sure that she doesn't have endocarditis and they find out that she has a small p fo so what happens when you have a thrombosed tips you go back in there and you do a

tips or vision you line it with a beautiful new stent that you put in appropriately but would you do that when the patient has a shunt going from one side of the heart to the other so going from the right to the left so sort of

similar to that case right and so what do we do so I you know certainly not the smartest person in the room we've demonstrated that so I go and I asked my colleagues and so the loud voice of saying you know I told you this is why

we don't practice this kind of medicine and then there was someone who said why don't we anticoagulate her and I was like are you kidding me like you know do you think a little lovenox is gonna cure this and then the same person who said

we should do a tunnel dialysis tile the tunnel drainage catheter or like a polar X was like how about a poor X in here like thanks man we're kind of late for that what about thrombolysis and then you

know the most important WWJ be deed you guys are you familiar with that no what would Jim Benenati do that's that's that's the most important thing right so so of course you know I called Miami he's you know in a but in a big case you

know comes and helps me out and and I'm like what do I do and you know he's like just just go for it you know I mean there are thirty percent of the people that we see in the world have a efo it's very small and it probably doesn't do

anything but you know I got to tell you I was really nervous I went and I talked to miner our colleagues I made sure that the best guy who was you know available for stroke would be around in case I were to shower emboli I don't even know

what he would do I mean maybe take her and you know thrombolysis you know her like MCA or something I don't know I just wanted him to be around it just made me feel good and then I talked to another one of my favorite advisors

buland Arslan who who also was at UVA and he said why don't you instead of just going in there and mucking around with this clot especially because you have this shunt why don't you just thrown belay sit and then you

know and then see what happens and so here I brought her down EKOS catheter and I dripped a TPA for 24 hours and you know I made her do this with local I didn't give her any sedation because I wanted and it's not so painful and I

just wanted her to be awake so I could make sure that she isn't you took an intervention location you turned it into internal medicine I I did work you know that's that's you know I care right you know we're clinicians and so she was

fine she was very appreciative I had a penumbra the the the Indigo system around the next day in case I needed to go and do some aspiration thrombectomy and what do you know you know the next day it all opened up and you can still

see that the tips is short the uncovered portion which is which is you know past the ring I'm sorry that which is below the ring into the portal vein is not seated well so that was my error and and there was a little bit of clot there so

what I ended up doing is I ended up balloon dilating it placing another Viator and extending it into the portal vein so it's covered so she did very

well and the lessons I learned were that you know it's really good to ask

people's opinions you know and I think that's what I love about my institution it's very multidisciplinary and I love talking to my friends and advisors and mentors elsewhere but ultimately you know it's your patient it's your case

and you're responsible and so what we do not want to get into the habit of is like you're just throwing your hands up in there and be like well sorry why don't we put in a tunnel drainage catheter because that would have helped

her too but she's so much more grateful that I opened up the tips and believe it or not the bacteremia resolved as soon as the tips was covered and she finished her course of antibiotics and she's doing really well

so patient-centered care is also really important just because the you know papers and algorithms exist saying that you shouldn't do tips potentially in patients with communication of the biliary tree you

know you gotta you got to do what's right for the patient sometimes and if sometimes you have to go against algorithms and guidelines but you know but that's again a case-by-case basis thank you

thanks Maureen

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