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VP Shunt Migration | VP Shunt Retrieval | 64 | Male
VP Shunt Migration | VP Shunt Retrieval | 64 | Male
2016aneurysmcatheterfilterhemorrhageimagespatientperitonealplacementportionsheathshuntSIRsubarachnoidunderwentvenousventricular
Do Re-Interventions Cause EVAR Infections
Do Re-Interventions Cause EVAR Infections
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Extracranial Carotid Aneurysms: Natural History, Diagnosis And Optimal Treatment: From A Registry Of 350 Cases
Extracranial Carotid Aneurysms: Natural History, Diagnosis And Optimal Treatment: From A Registry Of 350 Cases
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A RCT Comparing Medical Treatment vs. Thrombolysis And First Rib Resection For Venous TOS - Paget Schroetter Syndrome With Subclavian Vein Thrombosis
A RCT Comparing Medical Treatment vs. Thrombolysis And First Rib Resection For Venous TOS - Paget Schroetter Syndrome With Subclavian Vein Thrombosis
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Routine Use Of Ultrasound To Avoid Complications During Placement Of Tunneled Dialysis Catheters: Analysis Of 2805 Cases
Routine Use Of Ultrasound To Avoid Complications During Placement Of Tunneled Dialysis Catheters: Analysis Of 2805 Cases
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Estimation Of Long-Term Aortic Risk After EVAR: The LEAR Model: How Can It Guide And Modulate Surveillance Protocols
Estimation Of Long-Term Aortic Risk After EVAR: The LEAR Model: How Can It Guide And Modulate Surveillance Protocols
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What Morphological Changes On CT After EVAR Predict The Need For Re-Interventions: From The DREAM Trial
What Morphological Changes On CT After EVAR Predict The Need For Re-Interventions: From The DREAM Trial
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Pitfalls Of Percutaneous EVAR (PEVAR) And How To Avoid Them
Pitfalls Of Percutaneous EVAR (PEVAR) And How To Avoid Them
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Advantages Of Cook Zenith Spiral Z Limbs For EVARs Landing In The External Iliac Artery
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VICI Stent Trial Update
VICI Stent Trial Update
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Inari CloTriever Device For Acute DVT
Inari CloTriever Device For Acute DVT
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Sandwich Technique For Treating AAAs Involving The Common Iliac Bifurcations: Experience With 151 Hypogastric Revascularizations: Lessons Learned
Sandwich Technique For Treating AAAs Involving The Common Iliac Bifurcations: Experience With 151 Hypogastric Revascularizations: Lessons Learned
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Cloud Based System For Image Fusion Techniques With Mobile C-Arms (The Cydar System): How Does It Work And Advantages For All Vascular Interventions
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How Can Medical Holograms And 3D Imaging Be Helpful During Endovascular Procedures
How Can Medical Holograms And 3D Imaging Be Helpful During Endovascular Procedures
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Update On The Value Of Tight Glucose Control To Minimize SCI From TEVAR And F/B/EVAR Treatment Of TAAAs
Update On The Value Of Tight Glucose Control To Minimize SCI From TEVAR And F/B/EVAR Treatment Of TAAAs
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Technical Tips For The Management Of Cervical And Mediastinal Iatrogenic Artery Injuries: How To Avoid Disasters
Technical Tips For The Management Of Cervical And Mediastinal Iatrogenic Artery Injuries: How To Avoid Disasters
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Single Session Continuous Aspiration Thrombectomy (SSCAT) For All DVT Utilizing Indigo Thrombectomy System
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Treating Venous Thromboembolism Without Lytic Medications
Treating Venous Thromboembolism Without Lytic Medications
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With Complex AAAs, How To Make Decisions Re Fenestrations vs. Branches: Which Bridging Branch Endografts Are Best
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Selective SMA Stenting With F/EVAR: When Indicated, Value, Best Bridging Stent, Technical Tips
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Technical Issues And Experience With MIS2ACE In 50 Patients Undergoing Endo TAAA Repair
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A New System For Treating Prosthetic Arterial And Aortic Graft Infections
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What Are The Complications Of Spinal Fluid Drainage: How Can They Be Prevented: Optimal Strategies For Preventing Or Minimizing SCI
What Are The Complications Of Spinal Fluid Drainage: How Can They Be Prevented: Optimal Strategies For Preventing Or Minimizing SCI
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Right Axillary Access For Complex EVARs And TEVARs: Advantages, Technical Tips And Preventing Strokes
Right Axillary Access For Complex EVARs And TEVARs: Advantages, Technical Tips And Preventing Strokes
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How To Treat Labial Varices: Sclerotherapy, USG Sclerotherapy And Or Phlebectomy
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Extensive Heel Gangrene With Advanced Arterial Disease: How To Achieve Limb Salvage: The Achilles Tendon Is Expendable And Patients Can Walk Well Without It
Extensive Heel Gangrene With Advanced Arterial Disease: How To Achieve Limb Salvage: The Achilles Tendon Is Expendable And Patients Can Walk Well Without It
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DEBATE: Too Many Small (45-55 mm) AAAs Are Treated By EVAR - At Least In The US
DEBATE: Too Many Small (45-55 mm) AAAs Are Treated By EVAR - At Least In The US
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New Devices For False Lumen Obliteration With TBADs: Indications And Results
New Devices For False Lumen Obliteration With TBADs: Indications And Results
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Challenges And Solutions In Complex Dialysis Access Cases
Challenges And Solutions In Complex Dialysis Access Cases
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The Value Of Hyperbaric Oxygen As A Rescue Treatment For SCI After F/B/EVAR For TAAAs
The Value Of Hyperbaric Oxygen As A Rescue Treatment For SCI After F/B/EVAR For TAAAs
aneurysmanimalanteriorarteryBEVARbloodconventionalcorddissolvedFEVARHBOThyperbaricinjuryischemiamechanismsoxygenpatientsraisingreperfusionsegmentalspinalstudiestherapeuticthoracoabdominal
Current Management Of Bleeding Hemodialysis Fistulas: Can The Fistula Be Salvaged
Current Management Of Bleeding Hemodialysis Fistulas: Can The Fistula Be Salvaged
accessaneurysmalapproachArtegraftavoidbleedingbovineBovine Carotid Artery Graft (BCA)carotidcentersDialysisemergencyexperiencefatalFistulafistulasflapgraftgraftshemodialysishemorrhageinfectioninterpositionlesionLimberg skin flapnecrosispatencypatientpatientsptfeskinStent graftsubsequentsuturetourniquetulceratedulcerationsvascular
Transcript

64 year old male, had a subarachnoid hemorrhage and he was treated with VP shunt, and he underwent successful aneurysm coiling. After his event he was transferred to our rehab hospital where he

was found to have DVT. And so we underwent placement of a potentially retrievable of IVC filter. And these are images from the filter placement, uneventful filter placement. So he was started on anticoagulation,

neuro surgeons one of them said we can coagulate him after six weeks. He returned for IVC filter removal, we saw him in the clinic. He had venous duplex, no DVT is part of our standard. He was recovering well from his hemorrhage,

as well as a coiling, no issues, no other procedures sounds pretty routine. So I hope this video plays, yeah. So they went and fluoroed the chest just at the beginning of the procedure and [BLANK AUDIO] And this is what was seen.

What the heck is that? Of course this was shot with iPhone like the other case and it was quickly messaged to the person who put the filter in, and said what is going on? >> And then there was the government versus Apple.

>> Okay. So- >> Is this an encrypted message? >> Yeah exactly. TigerText. So of course I bring you back to the original film when the filter

was placed. So here look at the diagnostic cavagram you see there's some undulation of the VP shunt here. Okay, and see on the post filter run you've lost that curve right it's straight okay, remember that. So then of course we're like well that's the VP shunt.

So we had images and of course you see that we took the filter out cuz he didn't need that anymore. And here's the shunt and no shunt. So we got a CT, you see that catheter there and [BLANK_AUDIO] Yeah

imagine that. So okay so there it is right, it's in the pulmonary artery, less than ideal. They said IR you've spent enough time with this patient, so the patient went to the neurosurgeon to remove the shunt,

figured they'd just pull it. And so they pulled then they got the ventricular portion out but the rest of it wouldn't come. So they said well how about you go back to IR. So the patient did come back to IR and underwent successful peritoneal

portion of the catheter removal. So we felt that the person was very unlucky and believe it or not the VP shunt catheter was probably tagged when the larger sheath for the filter went in. So what were the lessons learned?

I'm not sure any but in our practice we're gonna ask if a patient has had a VP shunt before filter placement and removal and probably not go on that side, that's my case. >> So what is that word tag exactly when you explain that? >> Yeah so there's a catheter that

comes right there and unlucky to tag, hit the catheter when the sheath is getting a little larger probably the friction from the sheath just pulled the catheter right there into the vein unknown to the operator and put the catheter that was not into the vascular space in the yeah.

We thought about this how could that possibly happen right? >> There's this 18 cm rule which is about 18 cm is the average distance from here if placing a central line to getting stuck on a filter that you're not aware of in an ICU. And it still confuses me why when you have a soft wire and a J wire interns are still taught to put the J in.

And reset filter but I guess- >> So this was just literally hitting the shunt pulling the whole shunt intravascular, crazy, so yeah all right, thank

- Good morning. I'd like to thank everybody who's in attendance for the 7 A.M. session. So let's talk about a case. 63 year old male, standard risk factors for aneurismal disease. November 2008, he had a 52 mm aneurism,

underwent Gore Excluder, endovascular pair. Follow up over the next five, relatively unremarkable. Sac regression 47 mm no leak. June 2017, he was lost for follow up, but came back to see us. Duplex imaging CTA was done to show the sac had increased

from 47 to 62 in a type 2 endoleak was present. In August of that year, he underwent right common iliac cuff placement for what appeared to be a type 1b endoleak. September, CT scan showed the sac was stable at 66 and no leak was present. In March, six months after that, scan once again

showed the sac was there but a little bit larger, and a type two endoleak was once again present. He underwent intervention. This side access on the left embolization of the internal iliac, and a left iliac limb extension. Shortly thereafter,

contacted his PCP at three weeks of weakness, fatigue, some lethargy. September, he had some gluteal inguinal pain, chills, weakness, and fatigue. And then October, came back to see us. Similar symptoms, white count of 12, and a CT scan

was done and here where you can appreciate is, clearly there's air within the sac and a large anterior cell with fluid collections, blood cultures are negative at that time. He shortly thereafter went a 2 stage procedure, Extra-anatomic bypass, explant of the EVAR,

there purulent fluid within the sac, not surprising. Gram positive rods, and the culture came out Cutibacterium Acnes. So what is it we know about this case? Well, EVAR clearly is preferred treatment for aneurism repair, indications for use h

however, mid-term reports still show a significant need for secondary interventions for leaks, migrations, and rupture. Giles looked at a Medicare beneficiaries and clearly noted, or at least evaluated the effect of re-interventions

and readmissions after EVAR and open and noted that survival was negatively impacted by readmissions and re-interventions, and I think this was one of those situations that we're dealing with today. EVAR infections and secondary interventions.

Fortunately infections relatively infrequent. Isolated case reports have been pooled into multi-institutional cohorts. We know about a third of these infections are related to aortoenteric fistula, Bacteremia and direct seeding are more often not the underlying source.

And what we can roughly appreciate is that at somewhere between 14 and 38% of these may be related to secondary catheter based interventions. There's some data out there, Matt Smeed's published 2016, 180 EVARs, multi-center study, the timing of the infection presumably or symptomatic onset

was 22 months and 14% or greater had secondary endointerventions with a relatively high mortality. Similarly, the study coming out of Italy, 26 cases, meantime of diagnosis of the infection is 20 months, and that 34.6% of these cases underwent secondary endovascular intervention.

Once again, a relatively high mortality at 38.4%. Study out of France, 11 institutions, 33 infective endographs, time of onset of symptoms 414 days, 30% of these individuals had undergone secondary interventions. In our own clinical experience of Pittsburgh,

we looked at our explants. There were 13 down for infection, and of those nine had multiple secondary interventions which was 69%, a little bit of an outlier compared to the other studies. Once again, a relatively high mortality at one year. There's now a plethora of information in the literature

stating that secondary interventions may be a source for Bacteremia in seeding of your endovascular graft. And I think beyond just a secondary interventions, we know there's a wide range of risk factors. Perioperative contamination, break down in your sterile technique,

working in the radiology suite as opposed to the operating room. Wound complications to the access site. Hematogenous seeding, whether it's from UTIs, catheter related, or secondary interventions are possible.

Graft erosion, and then impaired immunity as well. So what I can tell you today, I think there is an association without question from secondary interventions and aortic endograft infection. Certainly the case I presented appears to show causation but there's not enough evidence to fully correlate the two.

So in summary, endograft infections are rare fortunately. However, the incidence does appear to be subtly rising. Secondary interventions following EVAR appear to be a risk factor for graft infection. Graft infections are associated without question

a high morbidity and mortality. I think it's of the utmost importance to maintain sterile technique, administer prophylactic antibiotics for all secondary endovascular catheter based interventions. Thank you.

- Thank you chairman, ladies and gentlemen. I have no disclosures on this topic. So first, in short, the clinical challenge that we confront, this is course entity. As we all know, the primary extracranial carotid artery aneurysm with various etiologies, and it's very nice intervention to perform on it,

very nice surgery and the vascular techniques, but the main question actually, that we have to answer, do we need to treat it at all? And as there is a lack of natural history, we started in 2014 a web-based international registry in which all patients with an extracranial

carotid aneurysm can be included, and we look for clinical and imaging follow up data from admission to 30 days and longer on. I want to give you today an update on status of the registry. So far we included 371 patients.

If you take in acceleration that in all data published so far is only 3,000 patients of which about the health is case reports, I think this is already a large achievement. We are moving on ahead. In the graph you can see that we are

have increasing inclusion rates, and we are little behind in data management. But this seems very promising. About half the patients are derived from the Netherlands thus far. And about half the patients are from

international contributors. About the patient characteristics, about two thirds is male, age is respectively younger as considered to atherosclerotic disease in the carotid territory, as may be expected. What is important on the other characteristics

is that the data are largely comparable between the national and international cohort. About the characteristics of the aneurysm itself, are also there a large comparison between the two cohorts, national and international. A bit more often in the proximal and common

carotid in the international cohorts, and that's probably related as more international patients have been operated on, I come to that in the next slides. Most relevantly, for a primary goal to report also on the natural course,

about half the patients included so far were asymptomatic and had a natural course follow up. About treatment strategies performed, again, large part of the patients are followed up in a conservative fashion. We have some data on endovascular or hybrid approach,

but the large part of the revascularization is primary surgery. And next, to our analysis of natural course follow up, of course we also report on our long term outcomes of surgical intervention. This is the overview of completion of follow up,

there's some work to do as you can see. We expect to report a preliminary results in early next year when the data on the first year follow up is complete for the current cohort. In the meantime, we have large data sets on imaging, therefore we performed already

some analysis on the exceptional tortuosity as we can often see in these cases. We compared four available software packages using two observers and two rounds to define a tortuosity index. And we actually found that for these four

commercially available packages, have all of them have an excellent intraobserver agreement and also agreement between the observer. So, all four of these can be used to perform further imaging. As also we are looking for semi automated

volume measurements to define a standardized follow up in these patients. So for now, I can confirm that the Carotid Aneurysm Registry is an ongoing and observational registry. I think it's the largest registry on ECAA

so far and still growing. I would advise you all today, also to contribute to this registry and you can see the e-mail address for further information update. Thank you for your attention.

- Thank you chairman, ladies and gentlemen. I have no conflict of interest for this talk. So, basically for vTOS we have the well known treatment options. Either the conservative approach with DOAC or anticoagulation for three months or longer supported by elastic stockings.

And alternatively there's the invasive approach with catheter thrombolysis and decompression surgery and as we've just heard in the talk but Ben Jackson, also in surgeons preference, additional PTA and continuation or not of anticoagulation.

And basically the chosen therapy is very much based on the specific specialist where the patient is referred to. Both treatment approaches have their specific complications. Rethrombosis pulmonary embolism,

but especially the post-thrombotic syndrome which is reported in conservative treatment in 26 up to 66%, but also in the invasive treatment approach up to 25%. And of course there are already well known complications related to surgery.

The problem is, with the current evidence, that it's only small retrospective studies. There is no comparative studies and especially no randomized trials. So basically there's a lack of high quality evidence leading to varying guideline recommendations.

And I'm not going through them in detail 'cause it's a rather busy slide. But if you take a quick look then you can see some disparencies between the different guidelines and at some aspects there is no recommendation at all,

or the guidelines refer to selected patients, but they define how they should be selected. So again, the current evidence is insufficient to determine the most clinically and cost effective treatment approach, and we believe that a randomized trial is warranted.

And this is the UTOPIA trial. And I'm going to take you a bit through the design. So the research question underline this trial is, does surgical treatment, consisting of catheter directed thrombolysis and first rib section, significantly reduce post-thrombotic syndrome

occurrence, as compared to conservative therapy with DOAC anticoagulation, in adults with primary upper extremity deep vein thrombosis? The design is multicenter randomized and the population is all adults with first case of primary Upper Extremity

Deep Venous Thrombosis. And our primary outcome is occurrence of post-thrombotic syndrome, and this the find according the modified Villalta score. And there are several secondary outcomes, which of course we will take into account,

such as procedural complications, but also quality of life. This is the trial design. Inclusion informed consent and randomization are performed at first presentation either with the emergency department or outpatient clinic.

When we look at patients 18 years or older and the symptoms should be there for less than 14 days. Exclusion criteria are relevant when there's a secondary upper extremity deep vein thrombosis or any contra-indication for DOACs or catheter directed thrombolysis.

We do perform imaging at baseline with a CT venography. We require this to compare baseline characteristics of both groups to mainly determine what the underlying cause of the thrombosis being either vTOS or idiopathic.

And then a patient follows the course of the trial either the invasive treatment with decompression surgery and thrombolysis and whether or not PTA is required or not, or conservative treatment and we have to prefer DOAC Rivaroxaban or apixaban to be used.

Further down the patient is checked for one month and the Villalta score is adapted for use in the upper extremity and we also apply quality of life scores and scores for cost effectiveness analysis. And this is the complete flowchart of the whole trial.

Again, very busy slide, but just to show you that the patient is followed up at several time points, one, three, six, and 12 months and the 12 months control is actually the endpoint of the trial

And then again, a control CT venography is performed. Sample size and power calculation. We believe that there's an effect size of 20% reduction in post-thrombotic syndrome in favor of the invasive treatment and there's a two-side p-value of 0.05

and at 80% power, we consider that there will be some loss to follow up, and therefore we need just over 150 patients to perform this trial. So, in short, this slide more or less summarize it. It shows the several treatment options

that are available for these patients with Upper Extremity Venous Thrombosis. And in the trial we want to see, make this comparison to see if anticoagulation alone is as best as invasive therapy. I thank for your attention.

- I want to thank the organizers for putting together such an excellent symposium. This is quite unique in our field. So the number of dialysis patients in the US is on the order of 700 thousand as of 2015, which is the last USRDS that's available. The reality is that adrenal disease is increasing worldwide

and the need for access is increasing. Of course fistula first is an important portion of what we do for these patients. But the reality is 80 to 90% of these patients end up starting with a tunneled dialysis catheter. While placement of a tunneled dialysis catheter

is considered fairly routine, it's also clearly associated with a small chance of mechanical complications on the order of 1% at least with bleeding or hema pneumothorax. And when we've looked through the literature, we can notice that these issues

that have been looked at have been, the literature is somewhat old. It seemed to be at variance of what our clinical practice was. So we decided, let's go look back at our data. Inpatients who underwent placement

of a tunneled dialysis catheter between 1998 and 2017 reviewed all their catheters. These are all inpatients. We have a 2,220 Tesio catheter places, in 1,400 different patients. 93% of them placed on the right side

and all the catheters were placed with ultrasound guidance for the puncture. Now the puncture in general was performed with an 18 gauge needle. However, if we notice that the vein was somewhat collapsing with respiratory variation,

then we would use a routinely use a micropuncture set. All of the patients after the procedures had chest x-ray performed at the end of the procedure. Just to document that everything was okay. The patients had the classic risk factors that you'd expect. They're old, diabetes, hypertension,

coronary artery disease, et cetera. In this consecutive series, we had no case of post operative hemo or pneumothorax. We had two cut downs, however, for arterial bleeding from branches of the external carotid artery that we couldn't see very well,

and when we took out the dilator, patient started to bleed. We had three patients in the series that had to have a subsequent revision of the catheter due to mal positioning of the catheter. We suggest that using modern day techniques

with ultrasound guidance that you can minimize your incidents of mechanical complications for tunnel dialysis catheter placement. We also suggest that other centers need to confirm this data using ultrasound guidance as a routine portion of the cannulation

of the internal jugular veins. The KDOQI guidelines actually do suggest the routine use of duplex ultrasonography for placement of tunnel dialysis catheters, but this really hasn't been incorporated in much of the literature outside of KDOQI.

We would suggest that it may actually be something that may be worth putting into the surgical critical care literature also. Now having said that, not everything was all roses. We did have some cases where things didn't go

so straight forward. We want to drill down a little bit into this also. We had 35 patients when we put, after we cannulated the vein, we can see that it was patent. If it wasn't we'd go to the other side

or do something else. But in 35%, 35 patients, we can put the needle into the vein and get good flashback but the wire won't go down into the central circulation.

Those patients, we would routinely do a venogram, we would try to cross the lesion if we saw a lesion. If it was a chronically occluded vein, and we weren't able to cross it, we would just go to another site. Those venograms, however, gave us some information.

On occasion, the vein which is torturous for some reason or another, we did a venogram, it was torturous. We rolled across the vein and completed the procedure. In six of the patients, the veins were chronically occluded

and we had to go someplace else. In 20 patients, however, they had prior cannulation in the central vein at some time, remote. There was a severe stenosis of the intrathoracic veins. In 19 of those cases, we were able to cross the lesion in the central veins.

Do a balloon angioplasty with an 8 millimeter balloon and then place the catheter. One additional case, however, do the balloon angioplasty but we were still not able to place the catheter and we had to go to another site.

Seven of these lesions underwent balloon angioplasty of the innominate vein. 11 of them were in the proximal internal jugular vein, and two of them were in the superior vena cava. We had no subsequent severe swelling of the neck, arm, or face,

despite having a stenotic vein that we just put a catheter into, and no subsequent DVT on duplexes that were obtained after these procedures. Based on these data, we suggest that venous balloon angioplasty can be used in these patients

to maintain the site of an access, even with the stenotic vein that if your wire doesn't go down on the first pass, don't abandon the vein, shoot a little dye, see what the problem is,

and you may be able to use that vein still and maintain the other arm for AV access or fistular graft or whatever they need. Based upon these data, we feel that using ultrasound guidance should be a routine portion of these procedures,

and venoplasty should be performed when the wire is not passing for a central vein problem. Thank you.

- Thank you very much and thank you Dr. Veith for the kind invite. Here's my disclosures, clearly relevant to this talk. So we know that after EVAR, it's around the 20% aortic complication rate after five years in treating type one and three Endoleaks prevents subsequent

secondary aortic rupture. Surveillance after EVAR is therefore mandatory. But it's possible that device-specific outcomes and surveillance protocols may improve the durability of EVAR over time. You're all familiar with this graph for 15 year results

in terms of re-intervention from the EVAR-1 trials. Whether you look at all cause and all re-interventions or life threatening re-interventions, at any time point, EVAR fares worse than open repair. But we know that the risk of re-intervention is different

in different patients. And if you combine pre-operative risk factors in terms of demographics and morphology, things are happening during the operations such as the use of adjuncts,

or having to treat intro-operative endoleak, and what happens to the aortic sac post-operatively, you can come up with a risk-prediction tool for how patients fare in the longer term. So the LEAR model was developed on the Engage Registry and validated on some post-market registries,

PAS, IDE, and the trials in France. And this gives a predictive risk model. Essentially, this combines patients into a low risk group that would have standard surveillance, and a higher risk group, that would have a surveillance plus

or enhanced surveillanced model. And you get individual patient-specific risk profiles. This is a patient with around a seven centimeter aneurysm at the time of repair that shows sac shrinkage over the first year and a half, post-operatively. And you can see that there's really a very low risk

of re-intervention out to five years. These little arrow bars up here. For a patient that has good pre-operative morphology and whose aneurysm shrinks out to a year, they're going to have a very low risk of re-intervention. This patient, conversely, had a smaller aneurysm,

but it grew from the time of the operation, and out to two and a half years, it's about a centimeter increase in the sac. And they're going to have a much higher risk of re-intervention and probably don't need the same level of surveillance as the first patient.

and probably need a much higher rate of surveillance. So not only can we have individualized predictors of risk for patients, but this is the regulatory aspect to it as well.

Multiple scenario testing can be undertaken. And these are improved not only with the pre-operative data, but as you've seen with one-year data, and this can tie in with IFU development and also for advising policy such as NICE, which you'll have heard a lot about during the conference.

So this is just one example. If you take a patient with a sixty-five millimeter aneurysm, eighteen millimeter iliac, and the suprarenal angle at sixty degrees. If you breach two or more of these factors in red, we have the pre-operative prediction.

Around 20% of cases will be in the high risk group. The high risk patients have about a 50-55% freedom from device for related problems at five years. And the low risk group, so if you don't breach those groups, 75% chance of freedom from intervention.

In the green, if you then add in a stent at one year, you can see that still around 20% of patients remain in the high risk group. But in the low risk group, you now have 85% of patients won't need a re-intervention at five years,

and less of a movement in the high risk group. So this can clearly inform IFU. And here you see the Kaplan-Meier curves, those same groups based pre-operatively, and at one year. In conclusion, LEAR can provide

a device specific estimation of EVAR outcome out to five years. It can be based on pre-operative variables alone by one year. Duplex surveillance helps predict risk. It's clearly of regulatory interest in the outcomes of EVAR.

And an E-portal is being developed for dissemination. Thank you very much.

- Thank you Mr. Chairman, good morning ladies and gentlemen. So that was a great setting of the stage for understanding that we need to prevent reinterventions of course. So we looked at the data from the DREAM trial. We're all aware that we can try

to predict secondary interventions using preoperative CT parameters of EVAR patients. This is from the EVAR one trial, from Thomas Wyss. We can look at the aortic neck, greater angulation and more calcification.

And the common iliac artery, thrombus or tortuosity, are all features that are associated with the likelihood of reinterventions. We also know that we can use postoperative CT scans to predict reinterventions. But, as a matter of fact, of course,

secondary sac growth is a reason for reintervention, so that is really too late to predict it. There are a lot of reinterventions. This is from our long term analysis from DREAM, and as you can see the freedom, survival freedom of reinterventions in the endovascular repair group

is around 62% at 12 years. So one in three patients do get confronted with some sort of reintervention. Now what can be predicted? We thought that the proximal neck reinterventions would possibly be predicted

by type 1a Endoleaks and migration and iliac thrombosis by configurational changes, stenosis and kinks. So the hypothesis was: The increase of the neck diameter predicts proximal type 1 Endoleak and migration, not farfetched.

And aneurysm shrinkage maybe predicts iliac limb occlusion. Now in the DREAM trial, we had a pretty solid follow-up and all patients had CT scans for the first 24 months, so the idea was really to use

those case record forms to try to predict the longer term reinterventions after four, five, six years. These are all the measurements that we had. For this little study, and it is preliminary analysis now,

but I will be presenting the maximal neck diameter at the proximal anastomosis. The aneurysm diameter, the sac diameter, and the length of the remaining sac after EVAR. Baseline characteristics. And these are the re-interventions.

For any indications, we had 143 secondary interventions. 99 of those were following EVAR in 54 patients. By further breaking it down, we found 18 reinterventions for proximal neck complications, and 19 reinterventions

for thrombo-occlusive limb complications. So those are the complications we are trying to predict. So when you put everything in a graph, like the graphs from the EVAR 1 trial, you get these curves,

and this is the neck diameter in patients without neck reintervention, zero, one month, six months, 12, 18, and 24 months. There's a general increase of the diameter that we know.

But notice it, there are a lot of patients that have an increase here, and never had any reintervention. We had a couple of reinterventions in the long run, and all of these spaces seem to be staying relatively stable,

so that's not helping much. This is the same information for the aortic length reinterventions. So statistical analysis of these amounts of data and longitudinal measures is not that easy. So here we are looking at

the neck diameters compared for all patients with 12 month full follow-up, 18 and 24. You see there's really nothing happening. The only thing is that we found the sac diameter after EVAR seems to be decreasing more for patients who have had reinterventions

at their iliac limbs for thrombo-occlusive disease. That is something we recognize from the literature, and especially from these stent grafts in the early 2000s. So conclusion, Mr. Chairman, ladies and gentlemen, CT changes in the first two months after EVAR

predict not a lot. Neck diameter was not predictive for neck-reinterventions. Sac diameter seems to be associated with iliac limb reinterventions, and aneurysm length was not predictive

of iliac limb reinterventions. Thank you very much.

- Thank you very much and I would like to thank Dr. Veit for the kind invitation, this is really great meeting. Those are my disclosures. Percutaneous EVAR has been first reported in the late 1990's. However, for many reasons it has not been embraced

by the vascular community, despite the fact that it has been shown that the procedure can be done under local anesthesia and it decreases OR time, time to ambulation, wound complication and length of stay. There are three landmark papers which actually change this trend and make PEVAR more popular.

All of these three papers concluded that failure or observed failure of PEVAR are observed and addressed in the OR which is a key issue. And there was no late failures. Another paper which is really very prominent

is a prospective randomize study that's reported by Endologix and published in 2014. Which revealed that PEVAR closure of the arteriotomy is not inferior to open cut down. Basically, this paper also made it possible for the FDA to approve the device, the ProGlide device,

for closure of large bore arteriotomies, up to 26 in the arterial system and 29 in the venous system. We introduced percutaneous access first policy in our institution 2012. And recently we analyzed our results of 272 elective EVAR performed during the 2012 to 2016.

And we attempted PEVAR in 206 cases. And were successful in 92% of cases. But the question was what happened with the patient that failed PEVAR? And what we found that was significantly higher thrombosis, vessel thrombosis,

as well as blood loss, more than 500 cc in the failed PEVAR group. Similarly, there was longer operative time and post-operative length of stay was significantly longer. However, in this relatively small group of patients who we scheduled for cut-down due to different reasons,

we found that actually there was no difference between the PEVAR and the cut-down, failed PEVAR and cut-down in the terms of blood loss, thrombosis of the vessel, operative time and post-operative length of stay. So what are the predictors of ProGlide failure?

Small vessel calcification, particularly anterior wall calcification, prior cut-down and scarring of the groin, high femoral bifurcation and use of large bore sheaths, as well as morbid obesity. So how can we avoid failures?

I think that the key issue is access. So we recommend that all access now or we demand from our fellow that when we're going to do the operation with them, cut-down during fluoroscopy on the ultra-sound guidance, using micropuncture kits and access angiogram is actually mandatory.

But what happened when there is a lack of hemostasis once we've deployed two PEVARs? Number one, we try not to use more than three ProGlide on each side. Once the three ProGlide failed we use the angioseal. There's a new technique that we can have body wire

and deployed angioseal and still have an access. We also developed a technique that we pack the access site routinely with gelfoam and thrombin. And also we use so-called pull and clamp technique, shown here. Basically what it is, we pull the string of the ProGlide

and clamp it on the skin level. This is actually a very very very good technique. So in conclusion, PEVAR first approach strategy successful in more than 90% of cases, reduced operative time and postoperative length of stay, the failure occurred more commonly when the PEVAR

was completed outside of IFU, and there was no differences in outcome between failed PEVAR and planned femoral cut-down. Thank you.

- Thank you, Ulrich. Before I begin my presentation, I'd like to thank Dr. Veith so kindly, for this invitation. These are my disclosures and my friends. I think everyone knows that the Zenith stent graft has a safe and durable results update 14 years. And I think it's also known that the Zenith stent graft

had such good shrinkage, compared to the other stent grafts. However, when we ask Japanese physicians about the image of Zenith stent graft, we always think of the demo version. This is because we had the original Zenith in for a long time. It was associated with frequent limb occlusion due to

the kinking of Z stent. That's why the Spiral Z stent graft came out with the helical configuration. When you compare the inner lumen of the stent graft, it's smooth, it doesn't have kink. However, when we look at the evidence, we don't see much positive studies in literature.

The only study we found was done by Stephan Haulon. He did the study inviting 50 consecutive triple A patients treated with Zenith LP and Spiral Z stent graft. And he did two cases using a two iliac stent and in six months, all Spiral Z limb were patent. On the other hand, when you look at the iliac arteries

in Asians, you probably have the toughest anatomy to perform EVARs and TEVARs because of the small diameter, calcification, and tortuosity. So this is the critical question that we had. How will a Spiral Z stent graft perform in Japanese EIA landing cases, which are probably the toughest cases?

And this is what we did. We did a multi-institutional prospective observational study for Zenith Spiral Z stent graft, deployed in EIA. We enrolled patients from June 2017 to November 2017. We targeted 50 cases. This was not an industry-sponsored study.

So we asked for friends to participate, and in the end, we had 24 hospitals from all over Japan participate in this trial. And the board collected 65 patients, a total of 74 limbs, and these are the results. This slide shows patient demographics. Mean age of 77,

80 percent were male, and mean triple A diameter was 52. And all these qualities are similar to other's reporting in these kinds of trials. And these are the operative details. The reason for EIA landing was, 60 percent had Common Iliac Artery Aneurysm.

12 percent had Hypogastric Artery Aneurysm. And 24 percent had inadequate CIA, meaning short CIA or CIA with thrombosis. Outside IFU was observed in 24.6 percent of patients. And because we did fermoral cutdowns, mean operative time was long, around three hours.

One thing to note is that we Japanese have high instance of Type IV at the final angio, and in our study we had 43 percent of Type IV endoleaks at the final angio. Other things to notice is that, out of 74 limbs, 11 limbs had bare metal stents placed at the end of the procedure.

All patients finished a six month follow-up. And this is the result. Only one stenosis required PTA, so the six months limb potency was 98.6 percent. Excellent. And this is the six month result again. Again the primary patency was excellent with 98.6 percent. We had two major adverse events.

One was a renal artery stenosis that required PTRS and one was renal stenosis that required PTA. For the Type IV index we also have a final angio. They all disappeared without any clinical effect. Also, the buttock claudication was absorbed in 24 percent of patients at one month, but decreased

to 9.5 percent at six months. There was no aneurysm sac growth and there was no mortality during the study period. So, this is my take home message, ladies and gentlemen. At six months, Zenith Spiral Z stent graft deployed in EIA was associated with excellent primary patency

and low rate of buttock claudication. So we have most of the patients finish a 12 month follow-up and we are expecting excellent results. And we are hoping to present this later this year. - [Host] Thank you.

- Thank you very much. So this is more or less a teaser. The outcome data will not be presented until next month. It's undergoing final analysis. So, the Vici Stent was the stent in the VIRTUS Trial. Self-expanding, Nitinol stent,

12, 14, and 16 in diameter, in three different lengths, and that's what was in the trial. It is a closed-cell stent, despite the fact that it's closed-cell, the flexibility is not as compromised. The deployment can be done from the distal end

or the proximal end for those who have any interest, if you're coming from the jugular or not in the direction of flow, or for whatever reason you want to deploy it from this end versus that end, those are possible in terms of the system. The trial design is not that different than the other three

now the differences, there are minor differences between the four trials that three completed, one soon to be complete, the definitions of the endpoints in terms of patency and major adverse events were very similar. The trial design as we talked about, the only thing

that is different in this study were the imaging requirements. Every patient got a venogram, an IVUS, and duplex at the insertion and it was required at the completion in one year also, the endpoint was venographic, and those who actually did get venograms,

they had the IVUS as well, so this is the only prospective study that will have that correlation of three different imagings before, after, and at follow-up. Classification, everybody's aware, PTS severity, everybody's aware, the endpoints, again as we talked about, are very similar to the others.

The primary patency in 12 months was define this freedom from occlusion by thrombosis or re-intervention. And the safety endpoints, again, very similar to everybody else. The baseline patient characteristics, this is the pivotal, as per design, there were 170 in the pivotal

and 30 in the feasibility study. The final outcome will be all mixed in, obviously. And this is the distribution of the patients. The important thing here is the severity of patients in this study. By design, all acute thrombotic patients, acute DVT patients

were excluded, so anybody who had history of DVT within three months were excluded in this patient. Therefore the patients were all either post-thrombotic, meaning true chronic rather than putting the acute patients in the post-thrombotic segment. And only 25% were Neville's.

That becomes important, so if you look at the four studies instead of an overview of the four, there were differences in those in terms on inclusion/exclusion criteria, although definitions were similar, and the main difference was the inclusion of the chronics, mostly chronics, in the VIRTUS study, the others allowed acute inclusion also.

Now in terms of definition of primary patency and comparison to the historical controls, there were minor differences in these trials in terms of what that historical control meant. However, the differences were only a few percentages. I just want to remind everyone to something we've always known

that the chronic post-thrombotics or chronic occlusions really do the worst, as opposed to Neville's and the acute thrombotics and this study, 25% were here, 75% were down here, these patients were not allowed. So when the results are known, and out, and analyzed it's important not to put them in terms of percentage

for the entire cohort, all trials need to report all of these three categories separately. So in conclusion venous anatomy and disease requires obviously dedicated stent. The VIRTUS feasibility included 30 with 170 patients in the pivotal cohort, the 12 months data will be available

in about a month, thank you.

- Thank you very much, so my disclosures, I'm one of the co-PIs for national registry for ANARI. And clearly venous clot is different, requires different solutions for the arterial system. So this is a device that was built ground up to work in the venous system. And here's a case presentation of a 53 year old male,

with a history of spondylolisthesis had a lumbar inner body fusion, he had an anterior approach and corpectomy with application of an inner body cage. And you can see these devices here. And notably he had application of local bone graft and bone powder

and this is part of what happened to this patient. About seven days later he came in with significant left leg swelling and venous duplex showed clot right here, and this extended all the way down to the tibial vessels. And if you look at the CT

you can see extravasation of that bone powder and material obstructing the left iliac vein. And had severe leg swelling so the orthopedic people didn't want us to use TPA in this patient so we considered a mechanical solution. And so at this day and age I think goals of intervention

should be to maximize clot removal of course and minimize bleeding risk and reduce the treatment or infusion time and go to single session therapy whenever possible. Our ICUs are full all the time and so putting a lytic patient in there

reduces our ability to get other patients in. (mouse clicks So this is the ClotTriever thrombectomy device. It has a sheath that is a 13 French sheath and they're developing a 16 French, that opens up with a funnel

after it's inserted into the poplitiel. So the funnel is in the lower femoral vein and this helps funnel clot in when it's pulled down. The catheter has this coring element that abuts the vein wall and carves the thrombus off in a collecting bag

that extends up above to allow the thrombus to go into the bag as you pull it down. So you access the popliteal vein, cross the thrombosed segments with standard techniques and you need to then put an exchange length wire up into the SVC

or even out into the subclavian vein for stability. And then the catheter's inserted above the clot and is gradually pulled down, sort of milking that stuff off of the wall and into the bag that is then taken down to the funnel and out of the leg.

So this is the patient we had, we had thrombus in the femoral and up into the IVC. Extensive, you can see the hardware here. And it was very obstructed right at that segment where it was, had the bone material pushing on the vein it was quite difficult to get through there

but finally we did and we ballooned that to open a channel up large enough to accommodate ClotTriever catheter. We then did multiple passes and we extracted a large amount of thrombus. Some looking like typically acute stuff

and then some more dense material that may have been a few days worth of build up on the wall there. We then stinted with an 18 by 90 across the obstructed segment and this was our completion run.

It's not perfect but it looks like a pretty good channel going through. This is the hardware not obstruction at that level. Hospital course, the patient had significant improvement in their swelling by post-op day one. Was discharged on compression and anti-coagulation.

He returned about two months ago for his three month follow-up and really had very minimal symptoms in the left leg. Venous duplex showed that the left common femoral was partially compressible but did have phasic flow and the stent appeared to be open through it's course.

So of course this is an anecdote, this is early in the experience with this catheter. There have been numerous improvements made to ease the use of it and do it in fewer steps. And so we're starting a ClotTriever outcomes registry

to enroll up to 500 patients to begin to define outcomes with this device. It does offer the promise of single session therapy without lytic administration and we'll see how it performs and which patients it works best in through the registry.

Thank you very much.

- Thank you. I have a little disclosure. I've got to give some, or rather, quickly point out the technique. First apply the stet graph as close as possible to the hypogastric artery.

As you can see here, the end of distal graft. Next step, come from the left brachial you can lay the catheter in the hypogastric artery. And then come from both

as you can see here, with this verge catheter and you put in position the culver stent, and from the femoral you just put in position the iliac limb orthostatic graft.

The next step, apply the stent graft, the iliac limb stent graft, keep the viabahn and deployed it in more the part here. What you have here is five centimeter overlap to avoid Type I endoleak.

The next step, use a latex balloon, track over to the iliac limb, and keep until the, as you can see here, the viabahn is still undeployed. In the end of the procedure,

at least one and a half centimeters on both the iliac lumen to avoid occlusion to viabahn. So we're going to talk about our ten years since I first did my first description of this technique. We do have the inclusion criteria

that's very important to see that I can't use the Sandwich Technique with iliac lumen unless they are bigger than eight millimeters. That's one advantage of this technique. I can't use also in the very small length

of common iliac artery and external iliac artery and I need at least four millimeters of the hypogastric artery. The majority patients are 73 age years old. Majority males. Hypertension, a lot of comorbidity of oldest patients.

But the more important, here you can see, when you compare the groups with the high iliac artery and aneurismal diameter and treat with the Sandwich Technique, you can see here actually it's statistically significant

that I can treat patient with a very small real lumen regarding they has in total diameter bigger size but I can treat with very small lumen. That's one of the advantages of this technique. You can see the right side and also in the left side. So all situations, I can treat very small lumen

of the aneurysm. The next step so you can show here is about we performed this on 151 patients. Forty of these patients was bilateral. That's my approach of that. And you can see, the procedure time,

the fluoroscope time is higher in the group that I performed bilaterally. And the contrast volume tends to be more in the bilateral group. But ICU stay, length of stay, and follow up is no different between these two groups.

The technical success are 96.7%. Early mortality only in three patients, one patient. Late mortality in 8.51 patients. Only one was related with AMI. Reintervention rate is 5, almost 5.7 percent. Buttock claudication rate is very, very rare.

You cannot find this when you do Sandwich Technique bilaterally. And about the endoleaks, I have almost 18.5% of endoleaks. The majority of them was Type II endoleaks. I have some Type late endoleaks

also the majority of them was Type II endoleaks. And about the other complications I will just remark that I do not have any neurological complications because I came from the left brachial. And as well I do not have colon ischemia

and spinal cord ischemia rate. And all about the evolution of the aneurysm sac. You'll see the majority, almost two-thirds have degrees of the aneurysm sac diameter. And some of these patients

we get some degrees but basically still have some Type II endoleak. That's another very interesting point of view. So you can see here, pre and post, decrease of the aneurysm sac.

You see the common iliac artery pre and post decreasing and the hypogastric also decreasing. So in conclusion, the Sandwich Technique facilitates safe and effective aneurysm exclusion

and target vessel revascularization in adverse anatomical scenarios with sustained durability in midterm follow-up. Thank you very much for attention.

- Thank you. I have two talks because Dr. Gaverde, I understand, is not well, so we- - [Man] Thank you very much. - We just merged the two talks. All right, it's a little joke. For today's talk we used fusion technology

to merge two talks on fusion technology. Hopefully the rest of the talk will be a little better than that. (laughs) I think we all know from doing endovascular aortic interventions

that you can be fooled by the 2D image and here's a real life view of how that can be an issue. I don't think I need to convince anyone in this room that 3D fusion imaging is essential for complex aortic work. Studies have clearly shown it decreases radiation,

it decreases fluoro time, and decreases contrast use, and I'll just point out that these data are derived from the standard mechanical based systems. And I'll be talking about a cloud-based system that's an alternative that has some advantages. So these traditional mechanical based 3D fusion images,

as I mentioned, do have some limitations. First of all, most of them require manual registration which can be cumbersome and time consuming. Think one big issue is the hardware based tracking system that they use. So they track the table rather than the patient

and certainly, as the table moves, and you move against the table, the patient is going to move relative to the table, and those images become unreliable. And then finally, the holy grail of all 3D fusion imaging is the distortion of pre-operative anatomy

by the wires and hardware that are introduced during the course of your procedure. And one thing I'd like to discuss is the possibility that deep machine learning might lead to a solution to these issues. How does 3D fusion, image-based 3D fusion work?

Well, you start, of course with your pre-operative CT dataset and then you create digitally reconstructed radiographs, which are derived from the pre-op CTA and these are images that resemble the fluoro image. And then tracking is done based on the identification

of two or more vertebral bodies and an automated algorithm matches the most appropriate DRR to the live fluoro image. Sounds like a lot of gobbledygook but let me explain how that works. So here is the AI machine learning,

matching what it recognizes as the vertebral bodies from the pre-operative CT scan to the fluoro image. And again, you get the CT plus the fluoro and then you can see the overlay with the green. And here's another version of that or view of that.

You can see the AI machine learning, identifying the vertebral bodies and then on your right you can see the fusion image. So just, once again, the AI recognizes the bony anatomy and it's going to register the CT with the fluoro image. It tracks the patient, not the table.

And the other thing that's really important is that it recognizes the postural change that the patient undergoes between the posture during the CT scan, versus the posture on the OR table usually, or often, under general anesthesia. And here is an image of the final overlay.

And you can see the visceral and renal arteries with orange circles to identify them. You can remove those, you can remove any of those if you like. This is the workflow. First thing you do is to upload the CT scan to the cloud.

Then, when you're ready to perform the procedure, that is downloaded onto the medical grade PC that's in your OR next to your fluoro screen, and as soon as you just step on the fluoro pedal, the CYDAR overlay appears next to your, or on top of your fluoro image,

next to your regular live fluoro image. And every time you move the table, the computer learning recognizes that the images change, and in a couple of seconds, it replaces with a new overlay based on the obliquity or table position that you have. There are some additional advantages

to cloud-based technology over mechanical technology. First of all, of course, or hardware type technology. Excuse me. You can upgrade it in real time as opposed to needing intermittent hardware upgrades. Works with any fluoro equipment, including a C-arm,

so you don't have to match your 3D imaging to the brand of your fluoro imaging. And there's enhanced accuracy compared to mechanical registration systems as imaging. So what are the clinical applications that this can be utilized for?

Fluoroscopy guided endovascular procedures in the lower thorax, abdomen, and pelvis, so that includes EVAR and FEVAR, mid distal TEVAR. At present, we do need two vertebral bodies and that does limit the use in TEVAR. And then angioplasty stenting and embolization

of common iliac, proximal external and proximal internal iliac artery. Anything where you can acquire a vertebral body image. So here, just a couple of examples of some additional non EVAR/FEVAR/TEVAR applications. This is, these are some cases

of internal iliac embolization, aortoiliac occlusion crossing, standard EVAR, complex EVAR. And I think then, that the final thing that I'd like to talk about is the use with C-arm, which is think is really, extremely important.

Has the potential to make a very big difference. All of us in our larger OR suites, know that we are short on hybrid availability, and yet it's difficult to get our institutions to build us another hybrid room. But if you could use a high quality 3D fusion imaging

with a high quality C-arm, you really expand your endovascular capability within the operating room in a much less expensive way. And then if you look at another set of circumstances where people don't have a hybrid room at all, but do want to be able to offer standard EVAR

to their patients, and perhaps maybe even basic FEVAR, if there is such a thing, and we could use good quality imaging to do that in the absence of an actual hybrid room. That would be extremely valuable to be able to extend good quality care

to patients in under-served areas. So I just was mentioning that we can use this and Tara Mastracci was talking yesterday about how happy she is with her new room where she has the use of CYDAR and an excellent C-arm and she feels that she is able to essentially run two rooms,

two hybrid rooms at once, using the full hybrid room and the C-arm hybrid room. Here's just one case of Dr. Goverde's. A vascular case that he did on a mobile C-arm with aortoiliac occlusive disease and he places kissing stents

using a CYDAR EV and a C-arm. And he used five mils of iodinated contrast. So let's talk about a little bit of data. This is out of Blain Demorell and Tara Mastrachi's group. And this is use of fusion technology in EVAR. And what they found was that the use of fusion imaging

reduced air kerma and DSA runs in standard EVAR. We also looked at our experience recently in EVAR and FEVAR and we compared our results. Pre-availability of image based fusion CT and post image based fusion CT. And just to clarify,

we did have the mechanical product that Phillip's offers, but we abandoned it after using it a half dozen times. So it's really no image fusion versus image fusion to be completely fair. We excluded patients that were urgent/emergent, parallel endographs, and IBEs.

And we looked at radiation exposure, contrast use, fluoro time, and procedure time. The demographics in the two groups were identical. We saw a statistically significant decrease in radiation dose using image based fusion CT. Statistically a significant reduction in fluoro time.

A reduction in contrast volume that looks significant, but was not. I'm guessing because of numbers. And a significantly different reduction in procedure time. So, in conclusion, image based 3D fusion CT decreases radiation exposure, fluoro time,

and procedure time. It does enable 3D overlays in all X-Ray sets, including mobile C-arm, expanding our capabilities for endovascular work. And image based 3D fusion CT has the potential to reduce costs

and improve clinical outcomes. Thank you.

- Good morning, thank you very much to Dr. Veith and Professor Veith and the organizers. So this is real holography. It's not augmented reality. It's not getting you separated from the environment that you're in. This is actually taking the 3D out of the screen

so the beating heart can be held in the palm of your hand without you having to wear any goggles or anything else and this is live imaging. It can be done intra-procedure. This is the Holoscope-i and the other one is the Holoscope-x

where in fact you can take that actually 3D hologram that you have and you can implant it in the patient and if you co-register it correctly then you can actually do the intervention in the patient

make a needle tract to the holographic needle and I'm going to limit this to just now what we're actually doing at the moment and not necessarily what the future can be. This is ultimate 3D visualization, true volumes floating in the air.

This is a CT scan. So it started working, So we get rid of the auto-segmented and you can just interact. It's floating 45 centimeters away from you and you can just hold the patient's anatomy here and you can slice into the anatomy.

This is for instance a real CT of an aorta with the aortic valve which they wanted to analyze for a core valve procedure. This is done by Phelps. If you take the information

and they've looked at the final element analysis and interaction between the stem and the tissue. So here you can make measurements in real time. So if you did the 3D rotation and geography and you had the aorta and you wanted to put in a stent graft EVAR TVAR, and you would see,

and you could put in a typical tuber that you would do, and you could see how it, and this is a dynamic hologram, so you can see how it would open up, you can mark where your fenestration's chimney is and all that type of stuff would be. And you can move it around, and you have

a complete intuitive understanding of a, can we go to the next slide please, I can't, it seems to be clicking, thank you. So how do we do all this? Well, to create a hologram, what you need to do is just conceptualize it as printing in light.

Like if you had plastic and you took the XYZ data and you just put it into a 3D printer, and it would print it for you in light, then you'd go, Okay, so I understand, if it was printed for you in plastic then you'd understand. But imagine it's printing in light.

So we have every single piece of light focused, each photon is focused so that you can see it with a naked eye, in a particular place, but the difference is that it's totally sterile, you don't have to take off your gloves, you don't have to use a mouse,

you can interact with it directly. And all the XYZ data is 100% in place, so we've just seen a beautiful demonstration of augmented reality, and in augmented reality, you have to wear something, it isolates you from the environment that you're in, and it's based on

stereoscopy, and stereoscopy is how you see 3D movies, and how you see augmented reality, is by taking two images and fusing them in one focal plane. But you can't touch that image, because if you look at me now, you can see me very well, but if you hold your finger up 45 centimeters

and you focus on your finger, I become blurred. And so, you can only focus in one plane, you can't touch that image, because that image is distant from you, and it's a fused image, so you have the focus plane and you have the convergence plane, and this is an illusion

of 3D, and it's very entertaining, and it can be very useful in medical imaging, but in intra-operative procedures it has to be 100% accurate. So you saw a very beautiful example in the previous talk of augmented reality, where you have gesturing, where you can actually gesture with the image,

you can make it bigger, you can make it smaller. But what RealView does by creating real holography, which is all the XYZ data, is having it in the palm of your hand, with having above 20 focal planes, here, very very close to your eye, and that in another way, of having all those focal planes not only actually lets you

do the procedure but prevents nausea and having a feeling of discomfort because the image is actually there as of having the illusion of the images there. So just to go back, all RealView imaging is doing, is it's not changing your 3D RA cone, BMCT, MRI,

we can do all those XYZ datas and we can use them and we can present them, all we're doing, so you use your acquisition, we're just taking that, and we're breaking open the 3D displays and seeing all that 3D data limited in the 2D screen, let's set it free and have it floating in the air.

So we have the holoscope-i for structural cardiology and electrophysiology, and obviously the holoscope-x, which makes the patient x-rayed, completely visible. So its an over the head, this is now, obviously, free-standing when somebody buys us like Phillips or Siemens, it will be integrated into your lab,

come down from the ceiling, it's an independent system, and you just have a visor that you look through, which just goes up and down whenever you want to use it. You can interact with it the same as you do with your iPhone you can visualize, you can rotate, you can mark, you can slice, you can measure, as I showed you

some examples of it, and you can do this by voice as well, you just talk to it, you say slice and you slice it with your hand, it recognizes everybody's hand, there's no delay for whatever you're imaging. So structural cardiac procedures, this is what

a mitral valve will look like, floating in the air in front of you, you can see the anterior leaflet, the posterior leaflet. And once the catheter is inside and you're guiding the catheter inside the procedure, you can turn on your doppler, you'll be able to see that the catheter

movements, so for someone doing a mitral clip, or whatever, this would be very very useful. This is an electrophysiological procedure, and you can see how the catheter moves, when the catheter will move, and obviously, as my previous speaker was saying, you are appreciating 3D in a 2D screen,

so it's very difficult to appreciate, you'll have to take my word for it. But I think you can see dynamic colography at this quality, that you can interact with, that is something that is very special, we've presented at a number of conferences,

including at Veith, and we've already done a first in man, and the most exciting thing for now, is just this week, the first machine was installed at Toronto general, at the Peter Munk Cardiac Center, and they've done their first case, and so now we are launching and clinical trials in 2018, and hopefully,

I'll have something which is more vascular relevant, at the next time, Veith 2019, thank you very much.

- Good morning. Thank you Dr. Veith for this kind invitation to present our data. These are my disclosures. So despite multimodal strategies to improve spinal cord perfusion permanent paraplegia still occurs in up to ten percent of patients undergoing

complex thoracoabdominal procedures. And the rates of transient lower extremity weakness are even higher. Hyperglycemia is associated with worsened clinical outcomes after acute ischemic stroke, severe head injury and subarachnoid hemorrhage.

In experimental date in animal studies suggests that hyperglycemia may be deleterious in the setting of spinal cord ischemic injury, but human studies are lacking. We have previously shown that elevated blood and CSF glucose levels were significantly associated

with postoperative lower extremity weakness in patients undergoing multi-branched endovascular aortic aneurysm repair. And importantly these elevated glucose levels preceded the onset of lower extremity weakness. Based on the findings of this study, we initiated

an insulin infusion protocol to maintain postoperative glucose levels to less than 120 milligrams per deciliter in all patients undergoing MBEVAR. And the purpose of this current study was to determine whether using this insulin infusion protocol to achieve tight postoperative blood glucose control

decrease the rate of lower extremity weakness after MBEVAR. This was a single center prospective clinical trail of asymptomatic patients with thoracoabdominal or pararenal aneurysms who underwent MBEVAR. All patients were admitted one day prior to the procedure and treated with IV fluid hydration and their

antihypertensive medications were held peri-operatively. All of these patients underwent preoperative placement of a lumbar catheter for drainage of CSF. And in October of 2013 we began to collect blood and CSF samples on these patients for further analysis. In July of 2016 we began the insulin infusion protocol.

And in all patients who had a blood glucose level of greater than or equal to 120 milligrams per deciliter, they were started on a regular IV insulin infusion which was further titrated based on subsequent glucose measurements and then continued in the ICU for the first 48 hours postoperatively.

Between October of 2013 and April of 2018, 43 patients without pre-existing paraplegia underwent MBEVAR. The mean age of the cohort was 73 years and the majority were men. 19% of these patients had diabetes mellitus, but none of these patients were on insulin preoperatively.

53% of patients underwent treatment for either a type four or a pararenal aneurysm, but the proximal seal zone was in the superceliac aorta in all of these patients. Before initiation of the insulin infusion protocol 22 patients underwent MBEVAR, and after initiation of the insulin infusion protocol

21 patients underwent MBEVAR. There's no difference in demographic characteristics, comorbidity, or operative parameters between the two groups of patients. Before initiation of the insulin infusion protocol, seven of twenty-two patients developed

lower extremity weakness within the first 48 hours of repair. This was temporary in five patients, leaving two patients with permanent paraplegia. After we instituted the insulin infusion protocol, no patients developed lower extremity weakness

within the first 48 hours of repair. One patient did develop paraplegia on postoperative day four which was two days after the insulin had been stopped. This rate of early lower extremity weakness was significantly lower after initiation of the insulin infusion protocol.

And important to note that all patients in group B did require insulin at some point in the postoperative period. This table just describes the onset, laterality and nature of the deficit in the two groups of patients with lower extremity weakness.

Before initiation of the insulin infusion protocol, the blood and CSF glucose levels were significantly higher in the postoperative period in patients who develop lower extremity weakness compared to those who did not. After initiation of the insulin infusion protocol the glucose levels in the blood and CSF in this group

of patients was similar to those patients in the earlier group who did not have lower extremity weakness. So in conclusion, patients with elevated blood and CSF glucose levels are at higher risk for postoperative lower extremity weakness.

And strict control of their blood glucose levels in the first 48 hours appears to decrease this risk. And maybe that elevated glucose levels are directly toxic to neuronal tissue and what we're seeing are the protective effects of euglycemia. However, insulin receptors are abundant throughout the CNS,

so it's possible that we're also seeing one of the pleiotropic effects of insulin as it's known to have anti-inflammatory and vasodilatory effects throughout the CNS. So we're actually speculating that this postoperative hyperglycemia could be due to a state

of acute insulin resistance. And we're currently studying some changes in neuron-derived blood exosomes before and after MBEVAR to try to understand the processes at play. So stay tuned.

- These are my disclosures. So central venous access is frequently employed throughout the world for a variety of purposes. These catheters range anywhere between seven and 11 French sheaths. And it's recognized, even in the best case scenario, that there are iatrogenic arterial injuries

that can occur, ranging between three to 5%. And even a smaller proportion of patients will present after complications from access with either a pseudoaneurysm, fistula formation, dissection, or distal embolization. In thinking about these, as you see these as consultations

on your service, our thoughts are to think about it in four primary things. Number one is the anatomic location, and I think imaging is very helpful. This is a vas cath in the carotid artery. The second is th

how long the device has been dwelling in the carotid or the subclavian circulation. Assessment for thrombus around the catheter, and then obviously the size of the hole and the size of the catheter.

Several years ago we undertook a retrospective review and looked at this, and we looked at all carotid, subclavian, and innominate iatrogenic injuries, and we excluded all the injuries that were treated, that were manifest early and treated with just manual compression.

It's a small cohort of patients, we had 12 cases. Eight were treated with a variety of endovascular techniques and four were treated with open surgery. So, to illustrate our approach, I thought what I would do is just show you four cases on how we treated some of these types of problems.

The first one is a 75 year-old gentleman who's three days status post a coronary bypass graft with a LIMA graft to his LAD. He had a cordis catheter in his chest on the left side, which was discovered to be in the left subclavian artery as opposed to the vein.

So this nine French sheath, this is the imaging showing where the entry site is, just underneath the clavicle. You can see the vertebral and the IMA are both patent. And this is an angiogram from a catheter with which was placed in the femoral artery at the time that we were going to take care of this

with a four French catheter. For this case, we had duel access, so we had access from the groin with a sheath and a wire in place in case we needed to treat this from below. Then from above, we rewired the cordis catheter,

placed a suture-mediated closure device, sutured it down, left the wire in place, and shot this angiogram, which you can see very clearly has now taken care of the bleeding site. There's some pinching here after the wire was removed,

this abated without any difficulty. Second case is a 26 year-old woman with a diagnosis of vascular EDS. She presented to the operating room for a small bowel obstruction. Anesthesia has tried to attempt to put a central venous

catheter access in there. There unfortunately was an injury to the right subclavian vein. After she recovered from her operation, on cross sectional imaging you can see that she has this large pseudoaneurysm

coming from the subclavian artery on this axial cut and also on the sagittal view. Because she's a vascular EDS patient, we did this open brachial approach. We placed a stent graft across the area of injury to exclude the aneurism.

And you can see that there's still some filling in this region here. And it appeared to be coming from the internal mammary artery. We gave her a few days, it still was patent. Cross-sectional imaging confirmed this,

and so this was eventually treated with thoracoscopic clipping and resolved flow into the aneurism. The next case is a little bit more complicated. This is an 80 year-old woman with polycythemia vera who had a plasmapheresis catheter,

nine French sheath placed on the left subclavian artery which was diagnosed five days post procedure when she presented with a posterior circulation stroke. As you can see on the imaging, her vertebral's open, her mammary's open, she has this catheter in the significant clot

in this region. To manage this, again, we did duel access. So right femoral approach, left brachial approach. We placed the filter element in the vertebral artery. Balloon occlusion of the subclavian, and then a stent graft coverage of the area

and took the plasmapheresis catheter out and then suction embolectomy. And then the last case is a 47 year-old woman who had an attempted right subclavian vein access and it was known that she had a pulsatile mass in the supraclavicular fossa.

Was noted to have a 3cm subclavian artery pseudoaneurysm. Very broad base, short neck, and we elected to treat this with open surgical technique. So I think as you see these consults, the things to factor in to your management decision are: number one, the location.

Number two, the complication of whether it's thrombus, pseudoaneurysm, or fistula. It's very important to identify whether there is pericatheter thrombus. There's a variety of techniques available for treatment, ranging from manual compression,

endovascular techniques, and open repair. I think the primary point here is the prevention with ultrasound guidance is very important when placing these catheters. Thank you. (clapping)

- And thanks to Dr. Veith for the opportunity to get involved. Here's my disclosures. Like so many in the audience, for years and years we've had awesome results with the AngioJet from Boston Sci. We know that this rheolytic system works quite well.

However it has a black box warning for PE due to the hemolysis and the adenosine that can be extruded out. It's oftentimes not stand alone. It's not used for stroke and there can be some renal issues. But we've had excellent results with it over the years,

but at the end of the day often times you still need lytics. And I think Professor Davies just eluded to the potential problems not only medical, but legal as well of lytics. Therefore for the past four plus years we've utilized this as well as other thrombectomy devices.

This is the Indigo device from Penumbra. I'm certain by now most of your are familiar with it, but if not what it is it's a braided catheter that's very atraumatic and soft at the tip. It can come straight in or torqued so you can have some directionality to it.

And then what it also has is this separator technology which is really just like a glorified pipe cleaner to be honest. You're going to go in and out with this device as I'll show you here in a second, to clear the lumen while you're

allowing for continuous aspiration through this system. We learned from our neurosurgery colleagues who utilized typically the CAT five, sometimes six for their stroke patients, but now there's CAT three, five, six, and eight. And within the next probably three to four months

there's going to be CAT 10 or possibly even 12 out there. This is what you have. It's all pretty simple. You cross your lesion with the wire. You then bring your catheter across. You connect it to this suction device,

hit the green button and away you go. You get maximal aspiration. And what's nice about it is in particular for the CAT eight with the XTORQ, as you can see you can get out to vessel 25 millimeters in diameter.

So essentially a cava. This shows you how powerful this is. This is one of my patient's with a standard nitinol stent. A Zilver PTX was occluded and you can see how powerful this device

is with maximal aspiration. Turn it off and obviously the self expanding stent goes right back to normal. So after our results with the ALI patients, and we presented our data at the Midwest meeting in St. Louis earlier this fall,

we start looking at our DVT patients and here you can see an effort thrombosis. Somebody here. We went eight French basilic. Ultrasound guided. Put an eight French Indigo in and with no lytics,

were able to clean this out. We then went on to, I put him on a DOAC. Today I'd probably use Lovenox for two weeks. And then he went home. He's a 32 year old.

Went to Disney World with his family and then came back later on for is infraclavicular rib excision. Here's another one of my patients, Lena. She's a 19 year old who started her OPCs on the way back to Bellarmine College in Louisville.

And as you can see here, she is a likely underlying May Thurner lesion. Extensive of femoral DVT. As you look over here to the screen left to screen right, you can see that we crossed it, put our catheter up in the common iliac vein,

as as you can see we're twisting it around to get to the edges of the vessel, the whole iliofemoral system. Here's what you get afterwards. You get antegrade flow. Certainly there's no device yet that's perfect at this.

For this particular patient we gave her 14 milligrams of lytics then did our IVUS then did our wallstent. And she's done quite well. We use it for arms. We use it for legs.

We use it for filters as well as you can see here with this occluded filter. And often times the picture you're going to get is an underlying acute on chronic thrombosis here. And we later on came back and took that filter out. So I think there's no question there's less lytics with it.

Earlier this year we presented at the American Venous Forum in Tucson. Our initial experiences with vacuum-assisted thrombectomy for DVT. And what showed is that often times you can get antegrade flow as I'll show you here.

Some of them are single sessions. But more importantly just as efficacious as it is it's safe. You can see here that we had minimal blood loss, low transfusions, and here's our breakdown. As we use it for all venous pathologies as you can see.

So at the time when we looked at our first 20, you can see that there were some that were single session therapy. And that's before. We've now added the turbo pulse technique where you're going to lace it with

14 milligrams of TPA through a unifused catheter, wait 20 minutes, go around get some coffee, whatever you need to do, come back and then use the Indigo. So at the end of the day, I think as Professor Davies eluded to, there are major complications with lytics.

This is not what we need for our patients. So in 2018 we can either continue to load with dangerous lytics or minimize lytics, adopt continuous aspiration thrombectomy. It's your all's choice. So thanks so much.

- Great, thank-you very much, a pleasure to be here. My disclosures. So, we've talked a little bit about obviously percutaneous and thrombectomy techniques. Obviously we have catheter-directed thrombolysis with TPA, but what happens when we can't use TPA

mechanical techniques? We've discussed several of them already in this session, I'm going to try to kind of bring them together and note the differences and how they evolved. And really look at fragmentation, rheolytic therapy, vacuum assisted devices, and vacuum and suction devices.

So when do we need these? Patients that can't tolerate thrombolysis, can't get TPA, that have a high risk of TPA, or maybe there is a situation we need a rapid response. We're trying to create flow and establish flow as much as possible and a lot of times we use this

in combination therapy if we've already hurt. What's the ideal device? I think there are multiple different characteristic's that could define the ideal device. Obviously we want it simple to use, We want it to be reproducible,

we want it to remove a lot of thrombus, but minimize blood loss and trauma to the vessels and to the blood cell. These are just some of them. There's a lot of mechanical thrombectomy devices right now on the market continuing to grow,

both in the arterial and venous system so I think this is going to be an evolution. We started really using mechanical fragmentation with a pig tail and spinning a pig tail. We used that. A lot of times the patient with severe massive pulmonary embolism.

These we're really small antidotes, small case reports. Will Kuo, looked at these in the 2009 and basically saw over all clinical success, about 86% using these mechanical devices. Then we had some that were even more automated.

All these did was break up the clot. So you have the Trerotola Device , Cleaner Device, really almost in the dialysis space. Rheolytic Throbectomy, we've already heard about. Some of how it works and the advantages. Really I think this is the first time we've saw

a system which would try to aspirate and remove some of that thrombus as it got broken up. The PEARL registry really showed for the first time, maybe we can get this done within 24 hours, can we get this done in one session? Unfortunately in this registry only about three or

four percent of patients actually had just rheolytic therapy alone without any TPA. We've discussed a little bit about the use of Ango and this type of device in terms of bradyarrhythmia's and that may be a limitation. But I think we can still use it particularly

outside of the chest. So What about suction devices? You can have a catheter, I think a catheter suction device is very limited. We use that in the arterial tree when there is a small thrombus, a small embolus, I think

we're very limited, not only in the amount of thrombus we can remove but the amount of suction we can apply. Other types like almost mechanical, very simple to use systems is the aspire device. Well you can basically create and suction a

limited area and then help you aspirate the thrombus. And then to the other extreme. We're going to hear my next speaker talk about Angiovac, again a different system, a different system requires a patient on bypass large 26 french devices.

Where we can actually go in and deal with a large amount of thrombus, like this patient had a thrombus cave on both iliac veins. And to be able to basically come with this vacuum aspiration system over wires and kind of pulling them out and you get these little canisters,

seeing what you've actually removed. Very gratifying. But takes a lot of work to get it going. We've heard a little bit about vacuum assisted with the Indigo system. With a system of creating a constant continuous vacuum.

We now have eight french catheters with incredible aspiration volume, almost 20cc's, I'm sorry you can get up to 140cc's of thrombus in a minute can be aspirated quickly. Here is a patient, 80 years old, colorectal CA. You can see the thrombus in the right leg.

There was actually a mass invading this vein. That is where we wanted to use thrombolysis, really went a head and you can see the amount of thrombus. Cleared this out with some passage. You can see this here, the separator. You started seeing thrombus especially when

its acute it kind of looks like this. It's kind of gelatinous, things that we've already seen, and then went ahead and placed a stent, dilated that stent. Had to clean up some more with the device

on top of the stent, but with a good result without needing any TPA. Other types of extraction devices we've seen the Inari device, again this is like a stent Triever device, a nitinol ring we can use this in the pulmonary arteries.

And we've already seen previous and talked about the ClotTriever device Again remove that thrombus, put it into a bag and remove it. So again, capture and removal of thrombus. And this is a solution without the need of TPA. New kid in the block the JETi device

Again very similar to aspiration Indego device, but at the same time it has a jet to macerate the clot and kind of break up the clot a little to smaller areas so we can able to thromb and take more out. I think really here what I've seen and Dr. Razavi

showed me this case. Being able to treat a patient quickly, treat that patient very quickly you can see the amount of thrombus being able to, within about an hour and 15 minutes, get all that thrombus, then create patency in that vein and he showed

some early initial good data. Over the last year we did have a paper that was presented here and published this year in the Journal of Vascular Surgery, venous and lymphatic disorders and again pulled multiple patient's, again showing that

it affective and safe. We still need better data. We need to figure out which patients are best treated with which devices and which again will be affective. Thank-you very much.

- Thank you and thanks again Frank for the kind invitation to be here another year. So there's several anatomic considerations for complex aortic repair. I wanted to choose between fenestrations or branches,

both with regards to that phenotype and the mating stent and we'll go into those. There are limitations to total endovascular approaches such as visceral anatomy, severe angulations,

and renal issues, as well as shaggy aortas where endo solutions are less favorable. This paper out of the Mayo Clinic showing that about 20% of the cases of thoracodynia aneurysms

non-suitable due to renal issues alone, and if we look at the subset that are then suitable, the anatomy of the renal arteries in this case obviously differs so they might be more or less suitable for branches

versus fenestration and the aneurysm extent proximally impacts that renal angle. So when do we use branches and when do we use fenestrations? Well, overall, it seems to be, to most people,

that branches are easier to use. They're easier to orient. There's more room for error. There's much more branch overlap securing those mating stents. But a branch device does require

more aortic coverage than a fenestrated equivalent. So if we extrapolate that to juxtarenal or pararenal repair a branched device will allow for much more proximal coverage

than in a fenestrated device which has, in this series from Dr. Chuter's group, shows that there is significant incidence of lower extremity weakness if you use an all-branch approach. And this was, of course, not biased

due to Crawford extent because the graft always looks the same. So does a target vessel anatomy and branch phenotype matter in of itself? Well of course, as we've discussed, the different anatomic situations

impact which type of branch or fenestration you use. Again going back to Tim Chuter's paper, and Tim who only used branches for all of the anatomical situations, there was a significant incidence of renal branch occlusion

during follow up in these cases. And this has been reproduced. This is from the Munster group showing that tortuosity is a significant factor, a predictive factor, for renal branch occlusion

after branched endovascular repair, and then repeated from Mario Stella's group showing that upward-facing renal arteries have immediate technical problems when using branches, and if you have the combination of downward and then upward facing

the long term outcome is impaired if you use a branched approach. And we know for the renals that using a fenestrated phenotype seems to improve the outcomes, and this has been shown in multiple trials

where fenestrations for renals do better than branches. So then moving away from the phenotype to the mating stent. Does the type of mating stent matter? In branch repairs we looked at this

from these five major European centers in about 500 patients to see if the type of mating stent used for branch phenotype grafts mattered. It was very difficult to evaluate and you can see in this rather busy graph

that there was a combination used of self-expanding and balloon expandable covered stents in these situations. And in fact almost 2/3 of the patients had combinations in their grafts, so combining balloon expandable covered stents

with self expanding stents, and vice versa, making these analyses very very difficult. But what we could replicate, of course, was the earlier findings that the event rates with using branches for celiac and SMA were very low,

whereas they were significant for left renal arteries and if you saw the last session then in similar situations after open repair, although this includes not only occlusions but re-interventions of course.

And we know when we use fenestrations that where we have wall contact that using covered stents is generally better than using bare stents which we started out with but the type of covered stent

also seems to matter and this might be due to the stiffness of the stent or how far it protrudes into the target vessel. There is a multitude of new bridging stents available for BEVAR and FEVAR: Covera, Viabahn, VBX, and Bentley plus,

and they all seem to have better flexibility, better profile, and better radial force so they're easier to use, but there's no long-term data evaluating these devices. The technical success rate is already quite high for all of these.

So this is a summary. We've talked using branches versus fenestration and often a combination to design the device to the specific patient anatomy is the best. So in summary,

always use covered stents even when you do fenestrated grafts. At present, mix and match seems to be beneficial both with regards to the phenotype and the mating stent. Short term results seem to be good.

Technical results good and reproducible but long term results are lacking and there is very limited comparative data. Thank you. (audience applauding)

- These are my disclosures, as it pertains to this talk. FEVAR has become increasingly common treatment for juxtarenal aneurysm in the United States since it's commercial release in 2012. Controversy remains, however, with regard to stenting the SMA when it is treated with a single-wide, 10 mm scallop in the device.

You see here, things can look very similar. You see SMA treated with an unstented scallop on the left and one treated with the stented SMA on the right. It has been previously reported by Jason Lee that shuttering can happen with single-wide scallops of the SMA and in their experience

the SMA shuttering happens to different degree in patients, but is there in approximately 50% of the patients. But in his experience, the learning curve suggests that it decreases over time. At UNC, we use a selective criteria for stenting in the SMA. We will do a balloon test in the SMA,

as you see in the indication, and if the graft is not moved, then our SMA scallop is appropriate in line. If we have one scallop and one renal stent, its a high likelihood that SMA scallop will shift and change over time. So all those patients get stented.

If there is presence of pre-existing visceral stenosis we will stent the SMA through that scallop and in all of our plans, we generally place a 2 mm buffer, between the bottom edge of the scallop and the SMA. We looked over our results and 61 Zenith fenestrated devices performed over a short period of time.

We looked at the follow-up out up to 240 days and 40 patients in this group had at least one single wide scallop, which represented 2/3 of the group. Our most common configuration as in most practices is too small renal fenestrations and one SMA scallop.

Technically, devices were implanted in all patients. There were 27 patients that had scallops that were unstented. And 13 of the patients received stented scallops. Hospital mortality was one out of 40, from a ruptured hepatic artery aneurysm post-op.

No patients had aneurysm-related mortality to the intended treated aneurysm. If you look at this group, complications happen in one of the patients with stented SMA from a dissection which was treated with a bare metal stent extension at the time

of the initial procedure. And in the unstented patients, we had one patient with post-op nausea, elevated velocities, found to have shuttering of the graft and underwent subsequent stenting. The second patient had elevated velocities

and 20-pound weight loss at a year after his treatment, but was otherwise asymptomatic. There is no significant difference between these two groups with respect to complication risk. Dr. Veith in the group asked me to talk about stenting choice

In general, we use the atrium stent and a self-expanding stent for extension when needed and a fenestrated component. But, we have no data on how we treat the scallops. Most of those in our group are treated with atrium. We do not use VBX in our fenestrated cases

due to some concern about the seal around the supported fenestration. So Tips, we generally calculate the distance to the first branch of the SMA if we're going to stent it. We need to know the SMA diameter, generally its origin where its the largest.

We need to position the imaging intensifier orthogonal position. And we placed the stent 5-6 mm into the aortic lumen. And subsequently flare it to a 10-12 mm balloon. Many times if its a longer stent than 22, we will extend that SMA stent with a self-expanding stent.

So in conclusion, selective stenting of visceral vessels in single wide scallops is safe in fenestrated cases during this short and midterm follow-up if patients are carefully monitored. Stenting all single wide scallops is not without risk and further validation is needed

with multi-institution trial and longer follow-up

- Thank you, good morning everybody. Thank you for the kind invitation, Professor Veith, it's an honor for me to be here again this year in New York. I will concentrate my talk about the technical issues and the experience in the data we have already published about the MISACE in more than 50 patients.

So I have no disclosure regarded to this topic. As you already heard, the MISACE means the occlusion of the main stem of several segmental arteries to preserve the capability of the collateral network to build new arteries. And as a result, we developed

the ischemic preconditioning of the spinal cord. Why is this so useful? Because it's an entirely endovascular first stage of a staged approach to treat thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm in order to reduce the ischemic spinal cord injury.

How do you perform the MISACE? Basically, we perform the procedure in local anesthesia, through a percutaneous trans-femoral access using a small-bore sheath. The patient is awake, that means has no cerebrospinal fluid damage

so we can monitor the patient's neurological for at least 48 hours after the procedure. So, after the puncture of the common femoral artery, using a technique of "tower of power" in order to cannulate the segmental arteries. As you can see here, we started with a guiding catheter,

then we place a diagnosis catheter and inside, a microcatheter that is placed inside the segmental artery. Then we started occlusion of the ostial segment of the segmental artery. We use coils or vascular plugs.

We don't recommend the use of fluids due to the possible distal embolization and the consequences. Since we have started this procedure, we have gained a lot of experience and we have started to ask,

what is a sufficient coilembolization? As you can see here, this artery, we can see densely packed coils inside, but you can see still blood flowing after the coil. So, was it always occluding, or is it spontaneous revascularization?

That, we do not know yet. The question, is it flow reduction enough to have a ischemic precondition of the spinal cord? Another example here, you can see a densely packed coil in the segmental artery at the thoracic level. There are some other published data

with some coils in the segm the question is, which technique should we use, the first one, the second one? Another question, is which kind of coil to use? For the moment, we can only use the standard coils

in our center, but I think if we have 3-D or volume coils or if you have microvascular plugs that are very compatible with the microcatheter, we have a superior packing density, we can achieve a better occlusion of the segmental artery, and we have less procedure time and radiation time,

but we have to think of the cost. We recommend to start embolization of the segmental artery, of course, at the origin of it, and not too far inside. Here, you can see a patient where we have coiled a segmental artery very shortly after the ostium,

but you can see here also the development of the collaterals just shortly before the coils, leading to the perfusion of segmental artery that was above it. As you can see, we still have a lot of open question. Is it every patent segmental artery

a necessary to coil? Should we coil only the large ones? I show you an example here, you can see this segmental artery with a high-grade stenotic twisted ostium due to aortic enlargement.

I can show you this segmental artery, six weeks after coiling of a segmental artery lower, and you can see that the ostium, it's no more stenotic and you can see also the connection between the segmental artery below to the initial segmental artery.

Another question that we have, at which level should we start the MISACE? Here, can see a patient with a post-dissection aneurysm after pedicle technique, so these are all uncovered dissection stent, and you can see very nicely the anterior spinal artery

feeded by the anterior radiculomedullary artery from the segmental artery. So, in this patient, in fact, we start the coiling exactly at the seat of this level, we start to coil the segmental artery that feeds the anterior spinal artery.

So, normally we find this artery of the Th 9 L1, and you can see here we go upwards and downwards. We have some challenges with aneurysm sac enlargement, in this case, we use this technique to open the angle of the catheter, we can use also deflectable steerable sheath

in order to reach the segmental artery. And you can see here our results, again, I just will go fast through those, we have treated 57 patients, most of them were Type II, Type III aortic aneurysms. We have found in median nine patent segmental artery

at the level of the aorta to be treated, between 2 and 26, and we have coiled in multiple sessions with a mean interval of 60 days between the sessions. No sooner than seven days we perform the complete exclusion of the aneurysm

in order to let the collateral to develop, and you can see our result: at 30 days we had no spinal cord ischemia. So I can conclude that our first experience suggest that MISACE is feasible, safe, and effective, but segmental artery coiling in thoracoabdominal aneurysm

can be challenging, it's a new field with many open questions, and I looking forward for the results with PAPA_ARTiS study. Thank you a lot.

- Dear Chairman, Ladies and Gentlemen, Thank you Doctor Veith. It's a privilege to be here. So, the story is going to be about Negative Pressure Wound Non-Excisional Treatment from Prosthetic Graft Infection, and to show you that the good results are durable. Nothing to disclose.

Case demonstration: sixty-two year old male with fem-fem crossover PTFE bypass graft, Key infection in the right groin. What we did: open the groin to make the debridement and we see the silergy treat, because the graft is infected with the microbiology specimen

and when identified, the Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus epidermidis. We assess the anastomosis in the graft was good so we decided to put foam, black foam for irrigation, for local installation of antiseptics. This our intention-to treat protocol

at the University hospital, Zurich. Multi-staged Negative Pressure for the Wound Therapy, that's meets vascular graft infection, when we open the wound and we assess the graft, and the vessel anastomosis, if they are at risk or not. If they are not at risk, then we preserve the graft.

If they are at risk and the parts there at risk, we remove these parts and make a local reconstruction. And this is known as Szilagyi and Samson classification, are mainly validated from the peripheral surgery. And it is implemented in 2016 guidelines of American Heart Association.

But what about intracavitary abdominal and thoracic infection? Then other case, sixty-one year old male with intracavitary abdominal infection after EVAR, as you can see, the enhancement behind the aortic wall. What we are doing in that situation,

We're going directly to the procedure that's just making some punctures, CT guided. When we get the specimen microbiological, then start with treatment according to the microbiology findings, and then we downgrade the infection.

You can see the more air in the aneurism, but less infection periaortic, then we schedule the procedure, opening the aneurysm sac, making the complete removal of the thrombus, removing of the infected part of the aneurysm, as Doctor Maelyna said, we try to preserve the graft.

That exactly what we are doing with the white foam and then putting the black foam making the Biofilm breakdown with local installation of antiseptics. In some of these cases we hope it is going to work, and, as you see, after one month

we did not have a good response. The tissue was uneager, so we decided to make the removal of the graft, but, of course, after downgrading of this infection. So, we looked at our data, because from 2012 all the patients with

Prostetic Graft infection we include in the prospective observational cohort, known VASGRA, when we are working into disciplinary with infectious disease specialist, microbiologists, radiologist and surgical pathologist. The study included two group of patients,

One, retrospective, 93 patient from 1999 to 2012, when we started the VASGRA study. And 88 patient from April 2012 to Seventeen within this register. Definitions. Baseline, end of the surgical treatment and outcome end,

the end of microbiological therapy. In total, 181 patient extracavitary, 35, most of them in the groin. Intracavitary abdominal, 102. Intracavitary thoracic, 44. If we are looking in these two groups,

straight with Negative Pressure Wound Therapy and, no, without Negative Pressure Wound Therapy, there is no difference between the groups in the male gender, obesity, comorbidity index, use of endovascular graft in the type Samson classification,

according to classification. The only difference was the ratio of hospitalization. And the most important slide, when we show that we have the trend to faster cure with vascular graft infection in patients with Negative Pressure Wound Therapy

If we want to see exactly in the data we make uni variant, multi variant analysis, as in the initial was the intracavitary abdominal. Initial baseline. We compared all these to these data. Intracavitary abdominal with no Pressure Wound Therapy

and total graft excision. And what we found, that Endovascular indexoperation is not in favor for faster time of cure, but extracavitary Negative Pressure Wound Therapy shows excellent results in sense of preserving and not treating the graft infection.

Having these results faster to cure, we looked for the all cause mortality and the vascular graft infection mortality up to two years, and we did not have found any difference. What is the strength of this study, in total we have two years follow of 87 patients.

So, to conclude, dear Chairman, Ladies and Gentlemen, Explant after downgrading giving better results. Instillation for biofilm breakdown, low mortality, good quality of life and, of course, Endovascular vascular graft infection lower time to heal. Thank you very much for your attention.

(applause)

- Thanks Fieres. Thank you very much for attending this session and Frank for the invitation. These are my disclosures. We have recently presented the outcomes of the first 250 patients included in this prospective IDE at the AATS meeting in this hotel a few months ago.

In this study, there was no in-hospital mortality, there was one 30-day death. This was a death from a patient that had intracranial hemorrhage from the spinal drain placement that eventually was dismissed to palliative care

and died on postoperative day 22. You also note that there are three patients with paraplegia in this study, one of which actually had a epidural hematoma that was led to various significant and flacid paralysis. That prompted us to review the literature

and alter our outcomes with spinal drainage. This review, which includes over 4700 patients shows that the average rate of complications is 10%, some of those are relatively moderate or minor, but you can see a rate of intracranial hemorrhage of 1.5% and spinal hematoma of 1% in this large review,

which is essentially a retrospective review. We have then audited our IDE patients, 293 consecutive patients treated since 2013. We looked at all their spinal drains, so there were 240 placement of drains in 187 patients. You can see that some of these were first stage procedures

and then the majority of them were the index fenestrated branch procedure and some, a minority were Temporary Aneurysm Sac Perfusions. Our rate of complication was identical to the review, 10% and I want to point out some of the more important complications.

You can see here that intracranial hypotension occurred in 6% of the patients, that included three patients, or 2%, with intracranial hemorrhage and nine patients, or 5%, with severe headache that prolonged hospital stay and required blood patch for management.

There were also six patients with spinal hematomas for a overall rate of 3%, including the patient that I'll further discuss later. And one death, which was attributed to the spinal drain. When we looked at the intracranial hypotension in these 12 patients, you can see

the median duration of headache was four days, it required narcotics in seven patients, blood patch in five patients. All these patients had prolonged hospital stay, in one case, the prolongation of hospital stay was of 10 days.

Intracranial hemorrhage in three patients, including the patient that I already discussed. This patient had a severe intracranial hemorrhage which led to a deep coma. The patient was basically elected by the family to be managed with palliative care.

This patient end up expiring on postoperative day 21. There were other two patients with intracranial hemorrhage, one remote, I don't think that that was necessarily related to the spinal drain, nonetheless we had it on this review. These are some of the CT heads of the patients that had intracranial hemorrhage,

including the patient that passed away, which is outlined in the far left of your slide. Six patients had spinal hematoma, one of these patients was a patient, a young patient treated for chronic dissection. Patient evolved exceptionally well, moving the legs,

drain was removed on postoperative day two. As the patient is standed out of the bed, felt weakness in the legs, we then imaged the spine. You can see here, very severe spinal hematoma. Neurosurgery was consulted, decided to evacuate, the patient woke up with flacid paralysis

which has not recovered. There were two other patients with, another patient with paraplegia which was treated conservatively and improved to paraparesis and continues to improve and two other patients with paraparesis.

That prompted changes in our protocol. We eliminated spinal drains for Extent IVs, we eliminated for chronic dissection, in first stages, on any first stage, and most of the Extent IIIs, we also changed our protocol of drainage

from the routine drainage of a 10 centimeters of water for 15 minutes of the hours to a maximum of 20 mL to a drainage that's now guided by Near Infrared Spectroscopy, changes or symptoms. This is our protocol and I'll illustrate how we used this in one patient.

This is a patient that actually had this actual, exact anatomy. You can see the arch was very difficult, the celiac axis was patent and provided collateral flow an occluded SMA. The right renal artery was chronically occluded.

As we were doing this case the patient experienced severe changes in MEP despite the fact we had flow to the legs, we immediately stopped the procedure with still flow to the aneurysm sac. The patient develops pancreatitis, requires dialysis

and recovers after a few days in the ICU with no neurological change. Then I completed the repair doing a subcostal incision elongating the celiac axis and retrograde axis to this graft to complete the branch was very difficult to from the arm

and the patient recovered with no injury. So, in conclusion, spinal drainage is potentially dangerous even lethal and should be carefully weighted against the potential benefits. I think that our protocol now uses routine drainage for Extent I and IIs,

although I still think there is room for a prospective randomized trial even on this group and selective drainage for Extent IIIs and no drainage for Extent IVs. We use NIRS liberally to guide drainage and we use temporary sac perfusion

in those that have changes in neuromonitoring. Thank you very much.

- Good morning everybody. Here are my disclosures. So, upper extremity access is an important adjunct for some of the complex endovascular work that we do. It's necessary for chimney approaches, it's necessary for fenestrated at times. Intermittently for TEVAR, and for

what I like to call FEVARCh which is when you combine fenestrated repair with a chimney apporach for thoracoabdominals here in the U.S. Where we're more limited with the devices that we have available in our institutions for most of us. This shows you for a TEVAR with a patient

with an aortic occlusion through a right infracrevicular approach, we're able to place a conduit and then a 22-french dryseal sheath in order to place a TEVAR in a patient with a penetrating ulcer that had ruptured, and had an occluded aorta.

In addition, you can use this for complex techniques in the ascending aorta. Here you see a patient who had a prior heart transplant, developed a pseudoaneurysm in his suture line. We come in through a left axillary approach with our stiff wire.

We have a diagnostic catheter through the femoral. We're able to place a couple cuffs in an off-label fashion to treat this with a technically good result. For FEVARCh, as I mentioned, it's a good combination for a fenestrated repair.

Here you have a type IV thoraco fenestrated in place with a chimney in the left renal, we get additional seal zone up above the celiac this way. Here you see the vessels cannulated. And then with a nice type IV repaired in endovascular fashion, using a combination of techniques.

But the questions always arise. Which side? Which vessel? What's the stroke risk? How can we try to be as conscientious as possible to minimize those risks? Excuse me. So, anecdotally the right side has been less safe,

or concerned that it causes more troubles, but we feel like it's easier to work from the right side. Sorry. When you look at the image intensifier as it's coming in from the patient's left, we can all be together on the patient's right. We don't have to work underneath the image intensifier,

and felt like right was a better approach. So, can we minimize stroke risk for either side, but can we minimize stroke risk in general? So, what we typically do is tuck both arms, makes lateral imaging a lot easier to do rather than having an arm out.

Our anesthesiologist, although we try not to help them too much, but it actually makes it easier for them to have both arms available. When we look at which vessel is the best to use to try to do these techniques, we felt that the subclavian artery is a big challenge,

just the way it is above the clavicle, to be able to get multiple devices through there. We usually feel that the brachial artery's too small. Especially if you're going to place more than one sheath. So we like to call, at our institution, the Goldilocks phenomenon for those of you

who know that story, and the axillary artery is just right. And that's the one that we use. When we use only one or two sheaths we just do a direct puncture. Usually through a previously placed pledgeted stitch. It's a fairly easy exposure just through the pec major.

Split that muscle then divide the pec minor, and can get there relatively easily. This is what that looks like. You can see after a sheath's been removed, a pledgeted suture has been tied down and we get good hemostasis this way.

If we're going to use more than two sheaths, we prefer an axillary conduit, and here you see that approach. We use the self-sealing graft. Whenever I have more than two sheaths in, I always label the sheaths because

I can't remember what's in what vessel. So, you can see yes, I made there, I have another one labeled right renal, just so I can remember which sheath is in which vessel. We always navigate the arch first now. So we get all of our sheaths across the arch

before we selective catheterize the visceral vessels. We think this partly helps minimize that risk. Obviously, any arch manipulation is a concern, but if we can get everything done at once and then we can focus on the visceral segment. We feel like that's a better approach and seems

to be better for what we've done in our experience. So here's our results over the past five-ish years or so. Almost 400 aortic interventions total, with 72 of them requiring some sort of upper extremity access for different procedures. One for placement of zone zero device, which I showed you,

sac embolization, and two for imaging. We have these number of patients, and then all these chimney grafts that have been placed in different vessels. Here's the patients with different number of branches. Our access you can see here, with the majority

being done through right axillary approach. The technical success was high, mortality rate was reasonable in this group of patients. With the strokes being listed there. One rupture, which is treated with a covered stent. The strokes, two were ischemic,

one hemorrhagic, and one mixed. When you compare the group to our initial group, more women, longer hospital stay, more of the patients had prior aortic interventions, and the mortality rate was higher. So in conclusion, we think that

this is technically feasible to do. That right side is just as safe as left side, and that potentially the right side is better for type III arches. Thank you very much.

- Like to thank Dr. Veith and the committee for asking me to speak. I have no conflicts related to this presentation. Labial and vulvar varicosities occur in up to 10% of pregnant women, with the worst symptoms being manifested in the second half of the pregnancy.

Symptoms include genital pressure and fullness, pruritus, and a sensation of prolapse. These generally worsen with standing. Management is usually conservative. Between compression hose, cooling packs, and exercise, most women can make it through to the end of the pregnancy.

When should we do more than just reassure these women? An ultrasound should be performed when there's an early presentation, meaning in the first trimester, as this can be an unmasking of a venous malformation. If there are unilateral varicosities,

an ultrasound should be performed to make sure that these aren't due to iliac vein thrombosis. If there's superficial thrombosis or phlebitis, you may need to rule out deep venous extension with an ultrasound. When should we intervene?

You may need to intervene to release trapped blood in phlebitis, or to give low molecular weight heparin for comfort. When should a local phlebectomy or sclerotherapy be performed? Should sclerotherapy be performed during pregnancy?

We know very little. Occasionally, this is performed in a patient who is unknowingly pregnant, and there have been no clear complications from this in the literature. The effectiveness of sclero may also

be diminished in pregnancy, due to hormones and increased venous volume. Both polidocanol and sodium tetradecyl sulfate say that there is no support for use during pregnancies, and they advise against it. So what should you do?

This following case is a 24 year old G2P1, who was referred to me at 24 weeks for disabling vaginal and pelvic discomfort. She couldn't go to work, she couldn't take care of her toddler, she had some left leg complaints, but it was mostly genital discomfort and fullness,

and her OB said that he was going to do a pre-term C-section because he was worried about the risk of hemorrhage with the delivery. So this is her laying supine pre-op, and this is her left leg with varicosities visible in the anterior and posterior aspects.

Her ultrasound showed open iliac veins and large refluxing varicosities in the left vulvar area. She had no venous malformation or clot, and she had reflux in the saphenofemoral junction and down the GSV. I performed a phlebectomy on her,

and started with an ultrasound mapping of her superficial veins and perforators in the labial region. I made small incision with dissection and tie ligation of all the varicosities and perforators, and this was done under local anesthesia

with minimal sedation in the operating room. This resulted in vastly improved comfort, and her anxiety, and her OB's anxiety were both decreased, and she went on to a successful delivery. So this diagram shows the usual location of the labial perforators.

Here she is pre-op, and then here she is a week post-op. Well, what about postpartum varicosities? These can be associated with pelvic congestion, and the complaints can often be split into local, meaning surface complaints, versus pelvic complaints.

And this leads into a debate between a top down treatment approach, where you go in and do a venogram and internal coiling, versus a bottom up approach, where you start with local therapy, such as phlebectomy or sclero.

Pelvic symptoms include aching and pressure in the pelvis. These are usually worse with menstruation, and dyspareunia is most pronounced after intercourse, approximately an hour to several hours later. Surface complaints include vulvar itching, tenderness, recurrent thrombophlebitis, or bleeding.

Dyspareunia is present during or at initiation of sexual intercourse. I refer to this as the Gibson Algorithm, as Kathy Gibson and I have talked about this problem a lot, and this is how we both feel that these problems should be addressed.

If you have an asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic patient who's referred for varicosities that are seen incidentally, such as during a laparoscopy, those I don't treat. If you have a symptomatic patient who has pelvic symptoms, then these people get a venogram with coils and sclerotherapy as appropriate.

If they are not pregnant, and have no pelvic symptoms, these patients get sclero. If they are pregnant, and have no pelvic symptoms, they get a phlebectomy. In conclusion, vulvar varicosities are a common problem, and usually conservative management is adequate.

With extreme symptoms, phlebectomy has been successful. Pregnancy-related varicosities typically resolve post-delivery, and these can then be treated with local sclerotherapy if they persist. Central imaging and treatment is successful for primarily pelvic complaints or persistent symptoms.

Thank you.

- Good morning. It's a pleasure to be here today. I'd really like to thank Dr. Veith, once again, for this opportunity. It's always an honor to be here. I have no disclosures. Heel ulceration is certainly challenging,

particularly when the patients have peripheral vascular disease. These patients suffer from significant morbidity and mortality and its real economic burden to society. The peripheral vascular disease patients

have fivefold and increased risk of ulceration, and diabetics in particular have neuropathy and microvascular disease, which sets them up as well for failure. There are many difficulties, particularly poor patient compliance

with offloading, malnutrition, and limitations of the bony coverage of that location. Here you can see the heel anatomy. The heel, in and of itself, while standing or with ambulation,

has tightly packed adipose compartments that provide shock absorption during gait initiation. There is some limitation to the blood supply since the lateral aspect of the heel is supplied by the perforating branches

of the peroneal artery, and the heel pad is supplied by the posterior tibial artery branches. The heel is intolerant of ischemia, particularly posteriorly. They lack subcutaneous tissue.

It's an end-arterial plexus, and they succumb to pressure, friction, and shear forces. Dorsal aspect of the posterior heel, you can see here, lacks abundant fat compartments. It's poorly vascularized,

and the skin is tightly bound to underlying deep fascia. When we see these patients, we need to asses whether or not the depth extends to bone. Doing the probe to bone test

using X-ray, CT, or MRI can be very helpful. If we see an abcess, it needs to be drained. Debride necrotic tissue. Use of broad spectrum antibiotics until you have an appropriate culture

and can narrow the spectrum is the way to go. Assess the degree of vascular disease with noninvasive testing, and once you know that you need to intervene, you can move forward with angiography. Revascularization is really operator dependent.

You can choose an endovascular or open route. The bottom line is the goal is inline flow to the foot. We prefer direct revascularization to the respective angiosome if possible, rather than indirect. Calcanectomy can be utilized,

and you can actually go by angiosome boundaries to determine your incisions. The surgical incision can include excision of the ulcer, a posterior or posteromedial approach, a hockey stick, or even a plantar based incision. This is an example of a posterior heel ulcer

that I recently managed with ulcer excision, flap development, partial calcanectomy, and use of bi-layered wound matrix, as well as wound VAC. After three weeks, then this patient underwent skin grafting,

and is in the route to heal. The challenge also is offloading these patients, whether you use a total contact cast or a knee roller or some other modality, even a wheelchair. A lot of times it's hard to get them to be compliant.

Optimizing nutrition is also critical, and use of adjunctive hyperbaric oxygen therapy has been shown to be effective in some cases. Bone and tendon coverage can be performed with bi-layered wound matrix. Use of other skin grafting,

bi-layered living cell therapy, or other adjuncts such as allograft amniotic membrane have been utilized and are very effective. There's some other modalities listed here that I won't go into. This is a case of an 81 year old

with osteomyelitis, peripheral vascular disease, and diabetes mellitus. You can see that the patient has multi-level occlusive disease, and the patient's toe brachial index is less than .1. Fortunately, I was able to revascularize this patient,

although an indirect revascularization route. His TBI improved to .61. He underwent a partial calcanectomy, application of a wound VAC. We applied bi-layer wound matrix, and then he had a skin graft,

and even when part of the skin graft sloughed, he underwent bi-layer living cell therapy, which helped heal this wound. He did very well. This is a 69 year old with renal failure, high risk patient, diabetes, neuropathy,

peripheral vascular disease. He was optimized medically, yet still failed to heal. He then underwent revascularization. It got infected. He required operative treatment,

partial calcanectomy, and partial closure. Over a number of months, he did finally heal. Resection of the Achilles tendon had also been required. Here you can see he's healed finally. Overall, function and mobility can be maintained,

and these patients can ambulate without much difficulty. In conclusion, managing this, ischemic ulcers are challenging. I've mentioned that there's marginal blood supply, difficulties with offloading, malnutrition, neuropathy, and arterial insufficiency.

I would advocate that partial or total calcanectomy is an option, with or without Achilles tendon resection, in the presence of osteomyelitis, and one needs to consider revascularization early on and consider a distal target, preferentially in the angiosome distribution

of the posterior tibial or peroneal vessels. Healing and walking can be maintained with resection of the Achilles tendon and partial resection of the os calcis. Thank you so much. (audience applauding)

- Thanks very much Tim and thanks again to Dr. Veith for the kind invitation to speak on this topic. These are my disclosures. I'm just going to review a lot of the same data that you saw but I reach a slightly different conclusion than my opponent. We'll review randomized trials of open endovascular

and a review of current information on repair. The UK Small Aneurysm Trial was recently published out to twelve years. Over a thousand patients followed up for twelve years. 75% of the surveillance group ultimately did undergo aneurysm repair and these were the indications

that you see here. The time to repair by about eight years. The majority of patients who had come to repair were ultimately at that point but there is a significant number of patients who did not require repair.

And early repair did not affect mortality or rupture risk at all in these patients overall. These patients were extensively studied for their follow-up. You can see the primary rupture was slightly increased in the surveillance group but it was not

statistically significant and understand there is a primary rupture rate in the surgical group as the well as the secondary rupture risk in this group as well. The ADAM trial done in the US, over 1,100 patients followed-up to about five years.

And a little over 60% of the surveillance group ultimately underwent aneurysm repair for these indications. And about 10% of the patients were repaired outside of these recommendations to proceed onto repair. This is just a graphic look at the time to repair. At again about six to eight years you see the

flattening of that curve and there is a significant group of patients who do not require repair. This again did not have an affect on overall mortality early repair, and in fact when you look in this group at rupture, about 2% in the surveillance group,

.4% in the immediate surgery group. And sudden death which may be predictive of aneurysm rupture was essentially the same in the two groups. So I think this is a good look at what rupture was. In order to assess the outcomes with endovascular repair, we implemented the PIVOTAL Trial under

Ken Ouriel's guidance over 700 patients the mean follow-up in the publication was out to 20 months. Again about 60% of the group ultimately underwent aneurysm repair for the indications you see here. And again this curve looks fairly similar. At three years about 40% of the patients in the

surveillance group had undergone repair. No change in overall mortality. And in fact when you look at a composite end point of aneurysm rupture and aneurysm-related mortality, they're exactly the same. The CAESAR Trial in Italy,

a smaller group of patients followed up to over 4 years. Sixty percent ultimately undergoing a repair. No change in mortality. There are some differences in the rate of expansion of aneurysms, the larger aneurysms expanded at larger rates.

That's why recommendations are to survey them at a more frequent interval. I would point out though that when you look at aneurysm growth, in the EVAR group out at three years, about 10% of the population actually had

aneurysm growth even with the EVAR in place. Clearly EVAR alone does not protect these patients. The same paper that looked at a report of International consortium of registries, my opponent failed to point out that this cut-off right here,

is the difference between fee-for-service populations where this is done, and capitated systems where this is done. Clearly when you get paid more, you do more of these operations. In the VQI when you look overall,

40% of aneurysms are done in males, outside of indications are less than five and a half centimeters and a significant percentage in women less than five centimeters. When you look at the outcomes for endovascular repair, clearly there is a risk of reintervention,

If you look at two to three years, about 10 to 15% of patients will undergo reintervention. And in this same paper, the authors found that intervention, reintervention after EVAR clearly has an increased risk of mortality.

Here in pink you see the survival in the group of patients who had EVAR with reintervention. We assume that these are benign but the fact is, reinterventions carry their own mortality. So once we put these endographs in, we march these patients towards a process of

reintervention increasing mortality. And the fact is that right now, we should not be doing these. Aneurysm repair should according to guidelines. And the guidelines are based upon the best available evidence.

Small aneurysm repair does not make clinical, economic or overall sense. Thank you.

- Thank you (mumbles) and thank you Dr. Veith for the kind invitation to participate in this amazing meeting. This is work from Hamburg mainly and we all know that TEVAR is the first endovascular treatment of choice but a third of our patients will fail to remodel and that's due to the consistent and persistent

flow in the false lumen over the re-entrance in the thoracoabdominal aorta. Therefore it makes sense to try to divide the compartments of the aorta and try to occlude flow in the false lumen and this can be tried by several means as coils, plug and glue

but also iliac occluders but they all have the disadvantage that they don't get over 24 mm which is usually not enough to occlude the false lumen. Therefore my colleague, Tilo Kolbel came up with this first idea with using

a pre-bulged stent graft at the midportion which after ballooning disrupts the dissection membrane and opposes the outer wall and therefore occludes backflow into the aneurysm sac in the thoracic segment, but the most convenient

and easy to use tool is the candy-plug which is a double tapered endograft with a midsegment that is 18 mm and once implanted in the false lumen at the level of the supraceliac aorta it occludes the backflow in the false lumen in the thoracic aorta

and we have seen very good remodeling with this approach. You see here a patient who completely regressed over three years and it also answers the question how it behaves with respect to true and false lumen. The true lumen always wins and because once

the false lumen thrombosis and the true lumen also has the arterial pressure it does prevail. These are the results from Hamburg with an experience of 33 patients and also the international experience with the CMD device that has been implanted in more than 20 cases worldwide

and we can see that the interprocedural technical success is extremely high, 100% with no irrelevant complications and also a complete false lumen that is very high, up to 95%. This is the evolvement of the candy-plug

over the years. It started as a surgeon modified graft just making a tie around one of the stents evolving to a CMD and then the last generation candy-plug II that came up 2017 and the difference, or the new aspect

of the candy-plug II is that it has a sleeve inside and therefore you can retrieve the dilator without having to put another central occluder or a plug in the central portion. Therefore when the dilator is outside of the sleeve the backflow occludes the sleeve

and you don't have to do anything else, but you have to be careful not to dislodge the whole stent graft while retrieving the dilator. This is a case of a patient with post (mumbles) dissection.

This is the technique of how we do it, access to the false lumen and deployment of the stent graft in the false lumen next to the true lumen stent graft being conscious of the fact that you don't go below the edge of the true lumen endograft

to avoid (mumbles) and the final angiography showing no backflow in the aneurysm. This is how we measure and it's quite simple. You just need about a centimeter in the supraceliac aorta where it's not massively dilated and then you just do an over-sizing

in the false lumen according to the Croissant technique as Ste-phan He-lo-sa has described by 10 to 30% and what is very important is that in these cases you don't burn any bridges. You can still have a good treatment

of the thoracic component and come back and do the fenestrated branch repair for the thoracoabdominal aorta if you have to. Thank you very much for your attention. (applause)

- I think by definition this whole session today has been about challenging vascular access cases. Here's my disclosures. I went into vascular surgery, I think I made the decision when I was either a fourth year medical student or early on in internship because

what intrigued me the most was that it seemed like vascular surgeons were only limited by their imagination in what we could do to help our patients and I think these access challenges are perfect examples of this. There's going to be a couple talks coming up

about central vein occlusion so I won't be really touching on that. I just have a couple of examples of what I consider challenging cases. So where do the challenges exist? Well, first, in creating an access,

we may have a challenge in trying to figure out what's going to be the best new access for a patient who's not ever had one. Then we are frequently faced with challenges of re-establishing an AV fistula or an AV graft for a patient.

This may be for someone who's had a complication requiring removal of their access, or the patient who was fortunate to get a transplant but then ended up with a transplant rejection and now you need to re-establish access. There's definitely a lot of clinical challenges

maintaining access: Treating anastomotic lesions, cannulation zone lesions, and venous outflow pathology. And we just heard a nice presentation about some of the complications of bleeding, infection, and ischemia. So I'll just start with a case of a patient

who needed to establish access. So this is a 37-year-old African-American female. She's got oxygen-dependent COPD and she's still smoking. Her BMI is 37, she's left handed, she has diabetes, and she has lupus. Her access to date - now she's been on hemodialysis

for six months, all through multiple tunneled catheters that have been repeatedly having to be removed for infection and she was actually transferred from one of our more rural hospitals into town because she had a infected tunneled dialysis catheter in her femoral region.

She had been deemed a very poor candidate for an AV fistula or AV graft because of small veins. So the challenges - she is morbidly obese, she needs immediate access, and she has suboptimal anatomy. So our plan, again, she's left handed. We decided to do a right upper extremity graft

but the plan was to first explore her axillary vein and do a venogram. So in doing that, we explored her axillary vein, did a venogram, and you can see she's got fairly extensive central vein disease already. Now, she had had multiple catheters.

So this is a venogram through a 5-French sheath in the brachial vein in the axilla, showing a diffusely diseased central vein. So at this point, the decision was made to go ahead and angioplasty the vein with a 9-millimeter balloon through a 9-French sheath.

And we got a pretty reasonable result to create venous outflow for our planned graft. You can see in the image there, for my venous outflow I've placed a Gore Hybrid graft and extended that with a Viabahn to help support the central vein disease. And now to try and get rid of her catheters,

we went ahead and did a tapered 4-7 Acuseal graft connected to the brachial artery in the axilla. And we chose the taper mostly because, as you can see, she has a pretty small high brachial artery in her axilla. And then we connected the Acuseal graft to the other end of the Gore Hybrid graft,

so at least in the cannulation zone we have an immediate cannualation graft. And this is the venous limb of the graft connected into the Gore hybrid graft, which then communicates directly into the axillary vein and brachiocephalic vein.

So we were able to establish a graft for this patient that could be used immediately, get rid of her tunneled catheter. Again, the challenges were she's morbidly obese, she needs immediate access, and she has suboptimal anatomy, and the solution was a right upper arm loop AV graft

with an early cannulation segment to immediately get rid of her tunneled catheter. Then we used the Gore Hybrid graft with the 9-millimeter nitinol-reinforced segment to help deal with the preexisting venous outflow disease that she had, and we were able to keep this patient

free of a catheter with a functioning access for about 13 months. So here's another case. This is in a steal patient, so I think it's incredibly important that every patient that presents with access-induced ischemia to have a complete angiogram

of the extremity to make sure they don't have occult inflow disease, which we occasionally see. So this patient had a functioning upper arm graft and developed pretty severe ischemic pain in her hand. So you can see, here's the graft, venous outflow, and she actually has,

for the steal patients we see, she actually had pretty decent flow down her brachial artery and radial and ulnar artery even into the hand, even with the graft patent, which is usually not the case. In fact, we really challenged the diagnosis of ischemia for quite some time, but the pressures that she had,

her digital-brachial index was less than 0.5. So we went ahead and did a drill. We've tried to eliminate the morbidity of the drill bit - so we now do 100% of our drills when we're going to use saphenous vein with endoscopic vein harvest, which it's basically an outpatient procedure now,

and we've had very good success. And here you can see the completion angiogram and just the difference in her hand perfusion. And then the final case, this is a patient that got an AV graft created at the access center by an interventional nephrologist,

and in the ensuing seven months was treated seven different times for problems, showed up at my office with a cold blue hand. When we duplexed her, we couldn't see any flow beyond the AV graft anastomosis. So I chose to do a transfemoral arteriogram

and what you can see here, she's got a completely dissected subclavian axillary artery, and this goes all the way into her arterial anastomosis. So this is all completely dissected from one of her interventions at the access center. And this is the kind of case that reminded me

of one of my mentors, Roger Gregory. He used to say, "I don't wan "I just want out of the trap." So what we ended up doing was, I actually couldn't get into the true lumen from antegrade, so I retrograde accessed

her brachial artery and was able to just re-establish flow all the way down. I ended up intentionally covering the entry into her AV graft to get that out of the circuit and just recover her hand, and she's actually been catheter-dependent ever since

because she really didn't want to take any more chances. Thank you very much.

- Good morning. Thank you very much. I realize the audience is a bit thin, but thank you very much Dr. Veith for the kind invitation to talk about this. As we all know, hyperbaric oxygen is a treatment that most of us

don't use in vascular surgery. However, we've been using it as a rescue treatment for spinal cord ischemia after all types of thoraco repair. These are my disclosures. So as we all know,

any type of thoracoabdominal aneurysm repair can result in interruption of the blood supply of the spinal cord. We know that some patients, about 10% will wake up with an immediate spinal cord injury, or often spinal cord injury can be delayed.

And the rates of spinal cord injury vary by both procedure and series. So open repairs, we all know the large experience published by Coselli, he had about a 9.6% total 30 day deficit rate, but ultimately only 2.9% had permanent paraplegia,

and 2.6 with permanent paraparesis. Now, fenestrated and branched cases, depending on which series you look at, and whether you look at meta-analysis, the rates of spinal cord injury rate between eight and 13%.

Now the spinal cord blood flow is a network of blood supply. We've got the anterior spinal artery which is the key collateral in the front of the spinal cord, which supplies the anterior two-thirds of the cord.

And that's where the important tracts that deliver motor and sensory signals to your legs exist. Now, segmental arteries play a key component of this, and we've all heard many years worth of talk about the Artery of Adamkiewicz,

but we know that's not the only artery that's important, and these small segmental vessels that are coming in to supply the spinal cord that you see in the cartoon on the bottom right, are critical in supplying the spinal cord blood flow. The etiology of cord injury is generally ischemic.

However, this can be potentiated by a systemic hypoperfusion. Some people believe that atheromatous embolic infarction is an important mechanism, and thrombosis of radicular arteries. We also have that mechanism of ischemia reperfusion

where there's ischemia during surgery and during clamp or after a deployment of an aortic graft, and that if you don't get reperfusion this proceeds to infarction. This cartoon on the left-hand side is from a recent article by Wynn and Archer

and it's really quite a good description of the mechanisms that lead to a spinal cord injury. Now, conventional therapy once spinal cord injury is discovered is really about maximizing perfusion to the cord by raising the mean blood pressure, optimizing hemoglobin delivery, CSF drainage,

but there are no proven drugs or adjuncts at the moment. Now why did we get interested in hyperbaric oxygen? Well there are many animal models and a lot of animal literature that suggests that hyperbaric oxygen has significant benefits. Now what are the mechanisms?

Well first of all, it's based on the fact that you can increase oxygen delivery to the cord by increasing the amount of dissolved oxygen. That's a fraction of the oxygen usually delivered by hemoglobin, but if you increase the amount of dissolved oxygen in the blood,

it can enhance diffusion into ischemic areas and that can have salutary effects on spinal cord function. The longer lasting effects have been documented in animal studies on anti-oxidant, oxidant mechanisms including nitric oxide, secretion of growth factors, modified inflammation and decreased

ischemia reperfusion injury. This is a recent article that we published based on our early experience, and basically what we do is patients who are identified as having spinal cord injury after thoracoabdominal aneurysm repair

get conventional therapy, with raising of the hemoglobin, raising of the blood pressure and enhanced spinal cord drainage. But if they don't respond and they're not improving, then we take them to the hyperbaric chamber

where they start out at 2.5 atmospheres and then are down to 2.4 for subsequent treatments. The main risk is oxygen toxicity and the patients are actually breathing 100% oxygen either through a hood or an endotracheal tube, and the other people that are monitoring them

in the chamber are at atmospheric pressure at, above atmospheric pressure, but having just regular 21% oxygen. The goal is to achieve supra physiologic concentrations of oxygen in the soluble in the plasma. And our initial therapy,

and this is described in seven patients, both a mixture of open and endovascular cases, and although not all patients recovered, we felt there was an important signal here. We've subsequently treated 18 patients, total of almost 90 therapies.

Average is five treatments per patient and we give it BID for the first two days. Six patients did not survive, but one of those completely recovered. We had nine patients who recovered from paraplegia and can ambulate, and three non, complete non-responders.

So in conclusion, hyperbaric oxygen is an experimental therapy. It raises the level of dissolved oxygen in the blood, potentially reperfusing the cord, and has about a 50% response rate after unresponsiveness to conventional therapy.

It's supported by limited animal data and it obviously requires larger studies and potentially randomized studies to determine its ultimate effectiveness. Thank you.

- We are talking about the current management of bleeding hemodialysis fistulas. I have no relevant disclosures. And as we can see there with bleeding fistulas, they can occur, you can imagine that the patient is getting access three times a week so ulcerations can't develop

and if they are not checked, the scab falls out and you get subsequent bleeding that can be fatal and lead to some significant morbidity. So fatal vascular access hemorrhage. What are the causes? So number one is thinking about

the excessive anticoagulation during dialysis, specifically Heparin during the dialysis circuit as well as with cumin and Xarelto. Intentional patient manipulati we always think of that when they move,

the needles can come out and then you get subsequent bleeding. But more specifically for us, we look at more the compromising integrity of the vascular access. Looking at stenosis, thrombosis, ulceration and infection. Ellingson and others in 2012 looked at the experience

in the US specifically in Maryland. Between the years of 2000/2006, they had a total of sixteen hundred roughly dialysis death, due to fatal vascular access hemorrhage, which only accounted for about .4% of all HD or hemodialysis death but the majority did come

from AV grafts less so from central venous catheters. But interestingly that around 78% really had this hemorrhage at home so it wasn't really done or they had experienced this at the dialysis centers. At the New Zealand experience and Australia, they had over a 14 year period which

they reviewed their fatal vascular access hemorrhage and what was interesting to see that around four weeks there was an inciting infection preceding the actual event. That was more than half the patients there. There was some other patients who had decoags and revisional surgery prior to the inciting event.

So can the access be salvaged. Well, the first thing obviously is direct pressure. Try to avoid tourniquet specifically for the patients at home. If they are in the emergency department, there is obviously something that can be done.

Just to decrease the morbidity that might be associated with potential limb loss. Suture repairs is kind of the main stay when you have a patient in the emergency department. And then depending on that, you decide to go to the operating room.

Perera and others 2013 and this is an emergency department review and emergency medicine, they use cyanoacrylate to control the bleeding for very small ulcerations. They had around 10 patients and they said that they had pretty good results.

But they did not look at the long term patency of these fistulas or recurrence. An interesting way to kind of manage an ulcerated bleeding fistula is the Limberg skin flap by Pirozzi and others in 2013 where they used an adjacent skin flap, a rhomboid skin flap

and they would get that approximal distal vascular control, rotate the flap over the ulcerated lesion after excising and repairing the venotomy and doing the closure. This was limited to only ulcerations that were less than 20mm.

When you look at the results, they have around 25 AV fistulas, around 15 AV grafts. The majority of the patients were treated with percutaneous angioplasty at least within a week of surgery. Within a month, their primary patency was running 96% for those fistulas and around 80% for AV grafts.

If you look at the six months patency, 76% were still opened and the fistula group and around 40% in the AV grafts. But interesting, you would think that rotating an adjacent skin flap may lead to necrosis but they had very little necrosis

of those flaps. Inui and others at the UC San Diego looked at their experience at dialysis access hemorrhage, they had a total 26 patients, interesting the majority of those patients were AV grafts patients that had either bovine graft

or PTFE and then aneurysmal fistulas being the rest. 18 were actually seen in the ED with active bleeding and were suture control. A minor amount of patients that did require tourniquet for a shock. This is kind of the algorithm when they look at

how they approach it, you know, obviously secure your proximal di they would do a Duplex ultrasound in the OR to assess hat type of procedure

they were going to do. You know, there were inciting events were always infection so they were very concerned by that. And they would obviously excise out the skin lesion and if they needed interposition graft replacement they would use a Rifampin soak PTFE

as well as Acuseal for immediate cannulation. Irrigation of the infected site were also done and using an impregnated antibiotic Vitagel was also done for the PTFE grafts. They were really successful in salvaging these fistulas and grafts at 85% success rate with 19 interposition

a patency was around 14 months for these patients. At UCS, my kind of approach to dealing with these ulcerated fistulas. Specifically if they bleed is to use

the bovine carotid artery graft. There's a paper that'll be coming out next month in JVS, but we looked at just in general our experience with aneurysmal and primary fistula creation with an AV with the carotid graft and we tried to approach these with early access so imagine with

a bleeding patient, you try to avoid using catheter if possible and placing the Artegraft gives us an opportunity to do that and with our data, there was no significant difference in the patency between early access and the standardized view of ten days on the Artegraft.

Prevention of the Fatal Vascular Access Hemorrhages. Important physical exam on a routine basis by the dialysis centers is imperative. If there is any scabbing or frank infection they should notify the surgeon immediately. Button Hole technique should be abandoned

even though it might be easier for the patient and decreased pain, it does increase infection because of that tract The rope ladder technique is more preferred way to avoid this. In the KDOQI guidelines of how else can we prevent this,

well, we know that aneurysmal fistulas can ulcerate so we look for any skin that might be compromised, we look for any risk of rupture of these aneurysms which rarely occur but it still needs to taken care of. Pseudoaneurysms we look at the diameter if it's twice the area of the graft.

If there is any difficulty in achieving hemostasis and then any obviously spontaneous bleeding from the sites. And the endovascular approach would be to put a stent graft across the pseudoaneurysms. Shah and others in 2012 had 100% immediate technical success They were able to have immediate access to the fistula

but they did have around 18.5% failure rate due to infection and thrombosis. So in conclusion, bleeding to hemodialysis access is rarely fatal but there are various ways to salvage this and we tried to keep the access viable for these patients.

Prevention is vital and educating our patients and dialysis centers is key. Thank you.

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