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Intra Procedure | Transforming from Clinical IR to Clinical Trials with Tirapazamine (TPZ)
Intra Procedure | Transforming from Clinical IR to Clinical Trials with Tirapazamine (TPZ)
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Kidney lesion | Cryoablation Case | Ablations: Cryo, Microwave, & RFA
Kidney lesion | Cryoablation Case | Ablations: Cryo, Microwave, & RFA
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Case- Ingested Foreign Bodies | OMG: Interesting Cases in Pediatric Radiology
Case- Ingested Foreign Bodies | OMG: Interesting Cases in Pediatric Radiology
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Nodule in right lung | Cryoablation Case | Ablations: Cryo, Microwave, & RFA
Nodule in right lung | Cryoablation Case | Ablations: Cryo, Microwave, & RFA
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Below Knee Deep Vein Thrombosis As Part Of Ilio-Femoral DVT: How I Deal With It
Below Knee Deep Vein Thrombosis As Part Of Ilio-Femoral DVT: How I Deal With It
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Importance of Endovascular Thrombectomy | Neuro-Interventions
Importance of Endovascular Thrombectomy | Neuro-Interventions
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Most common IR procedures and disease in China | Across the Pond: The state of Interventional Radiology in China
Most common IR procedures and disease in China | Across the Pond: The state of Interventional Radiology in China
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An Overview of PET, MRI and PET/MRI | PET/MRI: A New Technique to Obtain High Quality Diagnostic Images for Oncology Patients
An Overview of PET, MRI and PET/MRI | PET/MRI: A New Technique to Obtain High Quality Diagnostic Images for Oncology Patients
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Work-up for PAE | Nursing Management in Prostate Artery Embolization
Work-up for PAE | Nursing Management in Prostate Artery Embolization
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New Findings From The PERICLES Registry Shed Light On Ways To Improve Outcomes Of Parallel Grafts To Treat Complex Aneurysms
New Findings From The PERICLES Registry Shed Light On Ways To Improve Outcomes Of Parallel Grafts To Treat Complex Aneurysms
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Malignant melanoma, liver metastases | Cryoablation Case | Ablations: Cryo, Microwave, & RFA
Malignant melanoma, liver metastases | Cryoablation Case | Ablations: Cryo, Microwave, & RFA
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Case 11: Bleeding Tracheostomy Site | Emoblization: Bleeding and Trauma
Case 11: Bleeding Tracheostomy Site | Emoblization: Bleeding and Trauma
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Imaging Cryoablation | Ablations: Cryo, Microwave, & RFA
Imaging Cryoablation | Ablations: Cryo, Microwave, & RFA
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Update On The Advantages, Limitations And Midterm Results With The Terumo Aortic 3 Branch Arch Device: What Lesions Can It Treat
Update On The Advantages, Limitations And Midterm Results With The Terumo Aortic 3 Branch Arch Device: What Lesions Can It Treat
4 branch CMD TAAA deviceacuteAscending Graft Replacementcardiac arrestRelayBranchRepair segment with CMD Cuffruptured type A dissection w/ tamponadestent graft systemTerumo Aortictherapeutic
Practice Guidelines | Risk Mitigation: Periprocedural Screening and Anticoagulation Guidelines to Reduce Interventional Radiology Bleeding Risks
Practice Guidelines | Risk Mitigation: Periprocedural Screening and Anticoagulation Guidelines to Reduce Interventional Radiology Bleeding Risks
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Introduction- Foreign body aspiration | OMG: Interesting Cases in Pediatric Radiology
Introduction- Foreign body aspiration | OMG: Interesting Cases in Pediatric Radiology
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Transcript

- I wanted to discuss this topic because some of us are more sensitive to DNA damage than others. And it's a complicated ethical issue. I have a disclosure in that I developed a formulation to premedicate patients prior to CT and x-ray. We all know that we stand in fields of radiation for most of our careers,

and we also know that many of us have no hair for example on the outside of our left leg. This is a picture that a bunch of us took for fun demonstrating this. But this is in fact radiation dermatitis. We know that the founders of our field

suffered consequences from the chronic high doses that they received in the 1920's. And they lost digits, they lost ears, they lost noses any many of them died of cancers or cardiovascular disease. The mechanism of injury is the x-rays

impinge upon water molecules in our cells. They create free radicals. These free radicals bind with our DNA and then Oxygen binds with that site resulting in an oxidative injury which can be reduced by the use of anti-oxidants.

I studied this over the last eight or nine years and I looked at the issue of chronic low dose radiation. Now this is different from the data that we collect from Nagasaki and Hiroshima and from Chernobyl and elsewhere. There are cancer risks but there

are also cardiovascular risks. And there are risks from chronic inflammation from increased reactive Oxygen species circulating with our system. I've been in touch with the IAEA recently about this and they didn't actually

realize that we don't wear our badges. So they thought the data they were getting on the doses that we were receiving were accurate. So that was a very interesting conversation with them. So cardiologists have been known

to get lifetime doses of of over one Gray. There's a lot of literature on this in public health literature. For example for every 10 milliSieverts of low dose ionizing radiation and received by patients with acute MI's,

there's a 3% increase in age and sex adjusted cancer risk in the follow-up five years. There's an excellent paper from Kings College London demonstrating that when endovascular surgeons were studied with two specific immunofluorescence tests, P53 and H2 alpha,

they were able to demonstrate that some endovascular surgeons are more sensitive to radiation dose than others. So why would that be? Well it's interesting if you look at this genetically and you look at the repair mechanisms

and in this whole thing I think in fact the lens is kind of the canary in the coal mine. When you get radiation induced cataracts, it's in the posterior chamber of the lens not the middle or anterior, which is where age-related injury occurs.

And this is the germinal layer or reproductive layer. The growth layer in the lens itself. And this is where cataracts develop. And this is really kind of a harbinger I think of injury that occurs elsewhere in our system. We know that when we wear DLDs on our chest,

on our bodies, on our arms, that the dose to the left side of our head is six times higher than to the right. In fact they dosed the left lens as higher than the right. And most of us who have lens replacements have it of the left eye.

This literature from adjacent fields that we may no be aware of. In the flight safety literature for pilots and stewardesses. There's extensive literature on cosmic radiation to flight crews who's doses annually are in the same range as ours.

So when you look at medical staff, you have to look at the overall context of the human in the Angio suite. Many of our medical staff will not be well. They may have chronic cardiac disease. They may be on say drugs for auto

immune disease or Methotrexate. They may have other illnesses such as Multiple Myeloma. They may have antibiotics on board that alter the DNA repair ability like Tetracycline. And they have chronic stress and sleep dysfunction. Cigarettes and alcohol use.

All of these things decrease their ability to repair DNA damage. If you look at DNA repair mechanisms, there are constantly the terms BRCA1 and two, PARP, P53, and ATM that show up. And deficiencies in these,

I'm going to skip all this to show you, can result in increased injury from a same dose being received by two different individuals. Now who is at risk from this is well understood in adjacent fields.

Here are 37 references from the public health literature related to mutations and SNPs or polymorphisms in DNA structure known to cause increased sensitivity to radiation. So I would propose that in, and here are papers on that topic

in adjacent fields that we don't read. So when we talk about personalized medicine for our patients, we need to also think about personalized career choices based on our DNA repair ability when we decide what we do. This has to be done in the context

of empathetic compassionate approach. It may begin with screening based on family history and personal history, and then advance in the right context to genetic screening through mutations and SNPs that can decrease their ability

to repair DNA damage from our occupational exposure. I'll skip all this because I'm out of time. But one other issue to think about, mitochondrial DNA is inherited purely maternally. So maternal DNA damage, mitochondrial DNA damage could be transmitted across generations

in female interventionalists. Also screening is important. It's emotionally complex. It's ethically complex. But it's an important conversation to begin to have. Thank you.

finally intraoperative considerations positioning for comb bean tpz photo

sensitivity EKG and lab draws and noting the time of tpz injection so i wanted to say a little bit about comb beam all right who has comb beam at their facility just a few less okay comb beam is medical imaging technique consisting

of x-ray computed tomography where the x-rays are divergent forming a cone the scanning software collects the data and reconstructs it producing what is termed a digital volume composed of three dimensional voxels of anatomical data

that can then be manipulated and visualized with specialized software on the left is a standard floral image and on the right is the comb beam so the red shows the vascular angiography the blue is a tumor and the yellow is a feeding

artery to the term or so dr. Abuja lays a B today is heavily involved with research so the procedure room with Combee was exclusively constructed for her so positioning for comb beam I believe

to be the bigger challenge initially comb being requires the patient to have their arms up high and using comb beam technology increases the procedural time it would be difficult for the patients to maintain that position and keep still

without anesthesia we started clinical trials with nurse assisted moderate sedation and soon learned it was very difficult the majority of our HCC embolization --zz are done with with sedation but we're

now using anesthesia for all of it so the lead in this case was Tom the radiology tech which assisted with the placement of the anesthesia equipment and patient positioning our anesthesia personnel are not only out of their

comfort zone in the I are sweet but unfamiliar with tpz trial and how the comb beam equipment rotates completely around the patient the patient is wearing two sets of leads one for anesthesia and the other for research

the leads are radio translucent to reduce artifact and imaging keeping the lid lid lead in the department took some getting used to one set got thrown away one set was found up in the ICU one set was on the

anesthesia equipment it was hard keeping track of our special equipment there so the pulse oximetry and blood pressure are on the lower extremities for cone beam again to avoid artifact and imaging when we first

started using cone beam the nursing staff administering sedation were disconnecting patients from monitoring so there were short interruptions with viewing vital signs it became risky and time-consuming to do

so during the procedure one set of EKGs triplicates are done just prior to tpz injection so the treat the EKG triplicates are basically they're two minutes apart in sets of three and lastly having to keep the tpz in a brown

bag and protected from light during the transfer nurse to position there's the photo on the left upper corner doctor busy day basically draws a tpz through a three-way stopcock under a sterile towel

while the nurse keeps the syringe in the brown bag poking a hole in the bag just to NIF to just enough to expose the tip of the syringe and attach it to the three-way this way the tpz is protected from light these reminder adjustments

however they were difficult from the standard and it took time for all the nurses and techs to adjust all right so this here is just a group photo Tom I've got Tyler on the right Thanh our technologist and ELISA and myself so I

thought this was a good photo to represent radiology many specialties consult two IR but it just isn't quite known yet by the general population and surprisingly by the medical staff as well there is a quote by dr. Rosa be

published quote the reason the public doesn't quite understand is we deal with so many disease entities and so many body parts it's hard to brand us unquote so I don't know if you guys were aware but interventional radiology is now its

own medical specialty so hepatocellular carcinoma is a primary malignancy of the liver and now the third leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide with over

- [Dr. de Vries] Thank you for the kind introduction. These are my disclosures. It's why do endografts sometimes need additional fixation with EndoAnchors? Well first, patients with multiple hostile neck parameters still suffer a substantial risk for type I endoleak and endoleak related mortality.

The second reason is that our deployment accuracy of the endograft is not as good as we think. We reviewed 85 consecutive cases in our own hospital and we saw that mainly do the slope of the endograft in the aortic neck, we lose some important apposition,

especially in the outer curve. So the preoperative neck length is not the same as our post-EVAR seal. And the third reason is that some other techniques, like FEVAR do have their limitations and some people are declined because of the branch arteries.

There are also some physiological conditions which is are not good enough for FEVAR. And of course open surgery, well per definition is more invasive and also patients will sometimes have their aneurysm repaired by endovascular means. So EndoAnchors really creates the stability

of a surgical anastomosin shown by David Dietz, and it really rivals the migration resistant of a hand sewn anastomosis. Of the global Anchor registry is captured real-world usage of the EndoAnchors and nowadays 770 patients have been enrolled worldwide.

The Primary Arm represents the majority of the patients in the Anchor Registry, 437 patients in the patients in the Primary Arm. It's not exclusive the Anchor Registry for the Medtronic devices, but also the workhorses like Gore and the Zenith endograft.

Of the prophylactic arm, the patients treated without any endoleak it carries 314 patients in this data slide. And you can see that the majority of those patients will hostile neck parameters. It's true in 91 percentage of the patient cohort.

The median neck length is 11 plus millimeters and also conicity substantial in more than 40% of the cases. What about procedural success? It's high, it's almost 95%. You need an average of around 5.5 EndoAnchors and the time to implant those EndoAnchors is 15 minutes,

and of course there is a learning curve. Core Lab adjudicated outcome, the two years outcomes, there is no new type Ia endoleak in this cohort and no endograft migration. In the Kaplan-Meier Estimates, especially the freedom from

aneurysm related mortality is 98.4% and freedom from secondary procedures at two years timeframe is 92%. There are no serious adverse events related to the implantation of the EndoAnchors itself. No aneurysm rupture and the aneurysm-related mortality

is due to cardiopulmonary comorbidity and not due to aneurysm rupture itself. There's one patient with a surgical conversion in this cohort. And the short neck indication that are patients in the Primary, 70 patients,

only placed with an Endurant in combination with the EndoAnchors and in a prophylactic setting or a patients with a type Ia endoleak. But the median neck length is now less than seven millimeters, so really challenging necks

and also conicity is substantial. It's also a clinical challenging patients cohort. A lot of patients with notable comorbidities and what is important to mention, 17% are patients with symptomatic aneurysm and also one patient with a ruptured aneurysm.

And the well the main treatment is then for prophylactic use but also 21% of the patient do have type Ia endoleak. Procedural results are 31 minutes fluoro time, but only 17 minutes to implant the EndoAnchors. This is the one year outcome. I think it's excellent.

Only one patient with a type I endoleak and he needed a secondary intervention. We had two other patients with a secondary intervention but it was due to a false aneurysm in the groin and a distal extension. No conversion to open surgery and no ruptures.

What about the cost effectiveness? Well you have to consider, it's not only the device cost, but also the level of resource utilization, and also clinical outcomes. And when you compare the short neck cohort, here the 70 patients to the fenestrated IDE study,

there's a cost differential of more than 5,000 U.S. dollars in benefits of the use of the EndoAnchors in those short and hostiles necks. So we can conclude that the Endurant stent graft in combination with the EndoAnchors for short neck indication is easy to use.

It's an off the shelf solution. It gives greater flexibility versus the alternatives. There is no need for renal arterial catheterization and it's really efficient. Thank you very much.

- [Clark] Well, dear chairmen, Frank, thanks for the invitation. In this talk, I'd like to focus on the role of calcifications in the aortic wall, and whether we could use it for clinical risk assessment. My disclosures. Well, an aortic calcification is, of course,

a clear anatomical entity. It's not that difficult to visualize it. Obviously, for a meaningful assessment, we need to quantify it. This can be done by a simple, abdominal aortic calcium score, AAC 0.8.

The severity of calcification is measured in points assigned to the presence of high-density signaling on the anterior and posterior walls of the aorta between the first and the fourth lumbar vetrabra. The cumulative points of both anterior and posterior walls represent the AAC 0.8 score.

This is a cut from (mumbles) for event-free survival in 2 1/2 thousand individuals, and it shows the prognostic value of AAC for cardiovascular outcomes. A high AAC score predicts future events, and it says something about overall survival.

Now, occlusive and aneurysmal disease are not the same, but calcifications also occur in the aneurysmal wall, and they can be assessed with CTA, quite simply. The effects of calcification are unclear, and we don't know whether it's protective or it's generative.

To verify the roles of these calcifications, patients with an aneurysm confirmed by CT in a six-year period were included. Three groups were distinguished on the likelihood of rupture. The elective group were patients,

who had received elective surgery. Acute aneurysms were either symptomatic, nonruptured, or ruptured confirmed CTA. Doing so, significant differences in diameter and calcification were found between ruptured and elective patients.

Using the AAC score, symptomatic patients were significantly more calcified than elective ones. Then after logistic regression, comparing elective versus nonelective aneurysms, female gender came out as the most important risk factor. Compared to diameter, the AAC was better able to distinguish

acute from elective aneurysms. Now, it's obvious that the conclusions of the few studies we have on the prognostic value of calcification in triple A, directly linked to reliability of the methods of measuring the extent of calcification.

Fully quantitative measurements are considered to be best. Mass and volume and several software tools are currently being used, but without exact knowledge on accuracy or, ultimately, use of these tools. This one, we used the Phantom with calcium rods

of pre-established, massive volumes, which were scanned with the specifics D protocol for coronary arteries and one for the abdominal aorta. This was done to see whether calcification tools tested on coronary arteries can be directly applied to the aorta without adjustments.

Five CT scans for each protocol were performed, and the Phantom was moved two to five millimeters in a random direction between each scan to mimic patients' movement. For each measurement tool and for both scanning protocols, the mass and volume were greatly overestimated.

It appears that the error and the variability of the results increased, when the size and the mass of the calcium element decreased. Also, the presence of contrast has a significant effect on aortic calcification's course. To assess the size of this effect

on the clinical conditions, 50 four-phased liver CT scans were retrospectively collected and analyzed in patients over 65 years of age. The first phase was with contrast, followed by three... No, without contrast followed by three contrast

and have phases of different intensity. Here we saw that measuring calcifications under contrast-enhanced conditions overestimated the calcium volume by a significant margin, yet it underestimated the mass of calcification significantly.

As the results, there's no provision factor to adjust for the error. Clinically-relevant small calcifications are most erroneously measured. Tools validated for coronary arteries that can now be extrapolated to the abdominal aorta,

and patients will need two instead of one CT scan, so, with and without contrast. Most striking, I believe, the previous research using calcification scoring tools on the abdominal aorta, especially with contrast, should be highly scrutinized. As a final conclusion, I think it's clear

that before future studies are implemented, we should first harmonize protocols and software packages to get reliable calcium measurement results. Thank you for your attention.

here we have a MRI that shows a lesion in the left kidney sorry I don't have a

pointer here really but you can see the lesion in the medial part of the left kidney there couple probes are placed under CT guidance you can already see the beginning of the formation of an ice ball there this is the second probe you

can see the ice ball forming and there's a good example of the ice ball it's got good coverage of the the lesion as well as a good margin around that cryoablation tends to be less detrimental to the collecting system of

the kidney so some of the concerns when you do renal ablation is that you're gonna cause your read or strictures or urine leaks because you're burning the collecting system essentially with cryoablation you tend not to see that

you don't have to use something called pilar profusion is often right the idea with pilo profusion is you put a small catheter into the ureter and you infuse the kidney with cold saline so that the collecting system stays cold while you

while you burn the tumor well you don't often times have to do that with cryoablation so that's one benefit of it and then this is a one month later scan this is the normal appearance you can see the ablation zone that and the

resolution of the tumor will follow these up for a few years to make sure that all that tissue goes away and this

a what this is a 16 year old who

presented to the GI clinic with a 2-day history of sharp abdominal pain and I know we all think oh my gosh a teenager with abdominal pain how often do we see that it was accompanied by sweats she'd had one episode of non bloody vomiting

decreased oral intake and some diarrhea although she no longer has vomiting and diarrhea denies fever or trauma she does have a history of irritable bowel and chronic constipation and an ovarian cyst rupture so again you have a lot going on

with the abdomen with this kiddo and you know somewhat broad symptoms so on further examination she describes this pain as clearly different from any of her pain associated with IBS and constipation she specifically said it

feels like there is a bubble that is about to burst it was exacerbated by eating coughing and sneezing her she appeared a mild distress but her vital signs were stable and her tenderness was localized to and to the right upper

quadrant with palpation and percussion so the x-ray shows a your object 13 millimeters in length adjacent to the large bowel and liver she was transferred to the emergency department where her pain continued to

intensify they got a CT the IDI doc dug for some more history this goes just you know history history is important keep digging you know as long as you don't know what's going on keep digging and then

finally when talking about food and anything that she could have eaten different they did figure out they had just gotten the grill out about a week ago and the dad had cleaned it real good and they'd been eating barbecue so they

suspected a wire ingestion from the cleaning brush for the grill surgery was consulted there was no signs or symptoms of sepsis or peritonitis so she was admitted for observation this is the CT so you well it's got a narrow good so

you can see and then down here she got to the floor they decided on bowel rest pain control and antibiotics however the pain continued to intensify again feels like a needle poking me she was very specific about the pain where

it was how it felt so surgical removal was recommended and here you see the wire brush or bristle that they removed post-op uneventful discharged after two days with no complications she did continue to be treated for her IBS again

this really just highlights a really common outpatient IDI complaint with a really uncommon diagnosis keep in mind you know we've talked about unwitnessed and kids that you know don't want to tell well this was really you know a

whole different story it was an unknown ingestion take-homes in the last decade there has been a huge increase in reported incidence of this type with wire bristle detailed history preceding the onset of acute and focal

symptoms should prompt physicians to consider unintentional foreign body ingestion and continue digging for that history and

something some case examples of where I use cryoablation right so this is a

patient who has a nodule in the in the back of their lungs in the right lower lobe and basically I'll place two probes into that notch on either side of Brackett the lesion and then three months later fall up you can see a nice

resolution of that nodule so when it comes to lung a couple things I'll mention is if the nodule is greater than eight millimeters I'll immediately go to two probes I want to make sure that I cover the lesion whereas microwave it's

pretty rare depending on what device you're using for you to put more than one probe in so some people's concern with cryo in the lung is more probes means more risk of pneumothorax but you can also see surrounding and proximal to

where we did the place you can see the hemorrhage that you see so if those of you out there that are doing the lung ablations you probably have physicians that are using something called the triple freeze protocol right so the

double freeze protocol is the idea that you go ten minutes freeze five minutes 30 minutes freeze five minutes thought well what we saw was lung early on in the studies was a very large ablation a freeze to start with caused massive

hemorrhage patients were having very large amounts of hemorrhage so what we do now in lung is something called a triple freeze protocol we'll do a very short freeze about three minutes and that'll cause an ice ball to form and

then we'll thaw that in other three minutes three minutes of thawr and as soon as that starts to thaw we'll freeze it again and we've shown us a substantial decrease in the amount of hemorrhage so if you're doing long and

you and you you're told to do a double freeze protocol perhaps suggest the triple freeze is a better idea so that's three months later so another example

- You'll be pleased to know we've got a bit better at using ceiling mounted lead shields and goggles, but there's still room for improvement. These are my disclosures. I thought I'd start just by putting into context the exposures that we receive as operators. So medical diagnostics scans

can be anything up to 25 millisieverts. If you're a classified radiation worker you can only get 20 millisieverts per year. Background radiation, depending on where you live, is something between one and 10 millisieverts per year. And it varies from department to department.

But for a complex endovascular branch and fenestrated case you get typically 50 microsieverts of radiation outside the lead. What is irrefutable is that once you get to 100 millisieverts you have got a raised risk of solid cancers and leukemia.

What we do not know, we simply don't know, is what is the dose response below that 100 millisievert threshold, and is there any individual differences in sensitivity to radiation? Why don't we know?

Because we're no good at following up operators and patients after they receive an exposure. What we need is stringent study design, we need well defined populations, they need to be large studies, 10s of thousands, we need to control for

all the confounding factors for cancer, we need really high quality followup, and we need to know what dose we're receiving. This is my interventional radiology colleague. He's been there since the inception of the complex endovascular program at St. Thomas',

and I asked him to tell me what he did over the past 10 years. And you can see that this is his logbook. It excludes quite a number of perhaps lower exposure cases including GI cases, dilatations, nephrostomies. So he's done 1071 cases in 10 years.

He doesn't know his dose. But if you think per case exposure is 20, 40, or 60 microsieverts you can see that the exposures quickly build up. And in a 20-year career he's going to breach probably that 100 microsievert threshold.

So these numbers are just worth thinking about. So what evidence do we have that exposure causes DNA damage? It has been looked at in mice. If you expose mice they have an increased instance of lung tumors, for example. The radiation at low dose causes DNA damage.

It shortens the life span, and importantly, the risk is synergistic with other risks like smoking. In the course of this DNA damage and repair process, the repair process is not perfect. And eventually you get genomic instability,

and that's what causes cancer. When the cell is irradiated with low doses you also get generation of bad factors such as ROS and inflammatory factor. And we have shown in in operators that you get DNA damage before and after

you carry out fluoroscopically guided case. You can see here foci of this gamma H2AX which signal DNA damage in operators. And what happens over long term? There are markers you can look for long term that show that you're exhibiting genomic instability,

and this includes diccentrics. You can see these chromosomes are abnormal, and that happens as result of chronic radiation exposure. And micronuclei, so you can see that these cells express micronuclei. That is abnormal.

That is genomic instability and that means that your risk of cancer is increased. We haven't measured for these yet in operators, but they may well be present. So I think you need a combination of physical and biological dosimetry.

How do you do that? Well you need high throughput methods for doing it, which we don't have as yet. The current methods are laborious. You need to cont lots of cells and it takes a long time to do it.

But perhaps with the next generation high throughout sequencing this is what we'll be doing. Regular samples from operators and deciding whether there exhibiting genomic instability or not, should they be doing something other than carrying out endovascular operations.

In the meantime, radiation is really dangerous. I think that's what we've got to assume. No matter how much of a dose you're getting it's dangerous. The ALARA principles, you should hopefully all be familiar with, maximal shielding, and as mentioned,

the zero gravity suit. We've started using this. And obviously we wear leg shields. Just as something different, I mentioned that when your cell gets irradiated it produces lots of nasty factors

such as radioactive oxygen species and pro-inflammatory factors, and that can again cause DNA damage. Kieran Murphy spoke earlier on in the previous session about effective low-dose exposure. What they've done is given a cocktail of antioxidants

to patients who have cancer staging. And that actually reduces DNA damage. This is another study that came out recently, another cocktail of antioxidants, exposed to cells in vitro that were irradiated, and this is probably a less relevant study

because it's all in vitro. But again, in a very controlled situation these antioxidants do reduce the production of inflammatory factors in DNA damage. So perhaps we should all be taking a cocktail of pills before we operate.

So in summary, we live in a world of increasing radiation exposures. The health effects are unknown. We need better radiation in epidemiology, a combination of biological and physical dosimetry probably, and in the meantime we have to insist

on maximal protection and assume that all radiation is dangerous. Thank you very much.

- [Gerry] These are my disclosures. When it comes to ilio-femoral deep vein thrombosis, many of us feel that is the most important area to treat. And some of us feel that the inflow is very important, in which case, you've got to worry about it. But if you feel that the inflow doesn't matter at all, then you can forget about it.

So that's for those of you who aren't from New York, that was my Irish accent on a New York, forget it. This is one of the ways to get into the below-knee veins, posterior tibial venous access. It looks quite easy, it's not quite so easy. Although there's two veins side by side,

you typically only get one chance at one vein because the other one goes into spasm. Pardon me, very sensitive mouse, like myself. You choose your wire of choice. I quite like the ED3 Nitrex. And then confirm that you are inside the veins,

because that happens all of the time to me. Those are funny looking veins because I've managed to puncture the artery. And which brings up one of the pitfalls, try not to puncture the artery. If you do manage to get into the vein,

you then insert a catheter and a catheter-directed thrombolysis after that is fairly standard. There's a few little tips and tricks in terms of stitching it in, using a small sheath is possible.

Heparin through the sheath, and then TPA through the infusion catheter. If you are fortunate enough to have the right length of catheter for the thrombus, then you can leave it at that length. Otherwise, you can pull it back

by 10 or 15 centimeters per day. And it typically takes three days to perform catheter-directed thrombolysis in this region. We always put on compression stockings, which sounds fairly basic, but it's important because it means that things don't get pulled.

And curious house officers and doctors don't have a good look at it and pull the whole thing out. Or the patient, for that matter. That's posterior tibial vein access, fiddley, tricky, easy to get into the artery, spasm is coming. You can do it with pharmaco-mechanical thrombectomy

using a 6 French device. The only one that I'm familiar with would be the AngioJet Solent, and not the newer Zelante. Views of the West of Ireland, not from this morning. Then if you want to switch tracks, how else can you get into the deep veins

of the lower extremities? Well, we're talking about improving the inflow, so we're going to now try and go from above and below. This is a patient with massive deep vein thrombosis. You'll see in just a second now. Thrombus starting here,

occlusive thrombus going to the profunda, occlusive thrombus down into the femoral, duplicated femoral vein, and then, most importantly, it goes into the below-knee popliteal. You might say why does this matter? Why do you care about the popliteal at all?

Well, I'm a bit old-school. I do believe that inflow matters quite a lot. Pardon me. So you can see a thrombus starts just here, a rather unusual place for a thrombus to start. Typically it starts much higher in the common iliac vein.

You can see it goes into the profunda femoris here. That's quite important technically, because the profunda is a very important vein in terms of long-term patency of the segment. And you can also see, lordy me, that it goes into the below-knee here as well.

This is what we call criss-cross. Fairly standard, fairly straight-forward, back of the knees, catheters into the popliteal vein from above and below. It sounds very easy, it's actually surprisingly difficult. The problem is that although you start very far apart, your two needles tend to approach

and you tend to puncture the vein in almost identical position, time and time again. So you have to start what feels like an awfully long way apart, in order to get some clearance between the two catheters. This is what you look like

when you're going to start catheter-directed thrombolysis. And what we're doing now, is we start catheter-directed thrombolysis at the bottom end, while working on the top end. The bottom sheath, rather the sheath facing inferiorly, is 6 French, with an infusion catheter

which is typically 20 centimeters long. And then this is a 10 French sheath going north. And through that you can perform AngioJet or whatever your thrombectomy device de jour is. Now this is an initial venogram of the below-knee veins and you can appreciate that there's very little inline flow

going from south to north. And you're seeing a whole lot of collaterals and very little flow going north at all. Pardon me. AngioJet works well here, although there are a variety of thrombectomy devices.

Then I must say I'm a big believer in aspiration. And you can get quite aggressive with a curved 8 French catheter. It sounds very basic, works very well. It's particularly useful, again, to go back to the profunda femoris inflow,

as well as the internal iliac. So this is what it looks like after aspiration. And you can see a rather unusual stenosis. And then, obviously, you need to go on to treat that. We start with our stent at the top to cover the iliac vein compression point,

and then carry on down here, and add a further stent down at the bottom. The inguinal ligament, I don't think is nearly as important as others feel. I think you you have to stent from flow to flow. And you can see that the final flow we've got here

at the end is quite satisfactory. Now this is when I say at the end, this is the end of the above-knee treatment. 'Cause you still haven't dealt with the below-knee veins. So you get your catheters running overnight, and you've got thrombolysis going north and south.

So this is your sort of set-up, your 10 French sheath going north with a catheter through it. A drain fix is quite useful for those of you who have access to that, to keep the catheter in position. And similarly going south, like this.

And this is what it looks like below beforehand, and this is what it looks like afterwards. You might think well, that doesn't really matter very much, but the popliteal vein will guarantee the success of your treatment. If you do not have a patent popliteal vein, in my view,

your success long-term is going to be much more guarded. And then, this is what it looks like from below, and the next morning. You can also appreciate that there's quite significant inflow now from the profunda. You can see the mixing just there, at the top up here.

So you've now guaranteed an inflow from above and below, but it takes two days, typically, because you've got to work one day on the above-knee segment and the second day on the below-knee segment. So could you move it on a bit?

Again, Galway, but not this morning because it was raining. You can do it as a single session criss-cross, so this is very similar to many of the arterial thrombectomies that you perform. I specialize in big, swollen, purple legs,

save the Speedos, they're not mine. But he's got a very, very swollen right leg. Rather unusual when somebody presents with a right leg tense phlegmasia. It starts to get me wondering, why should he have a right leg phlegmasia?

No specific reason. Left, obviously, would be straightforward. A CTV again, heading south here. Nothing really specific there, but you can appreciate this leg is very tense indeed. And there's thrombus in the femoral,

and most importantly, it goes down below-knee again. So you've got no inflow into your popliteal segment. If that popliteal vein is opened, it's a straightforward one hour, one and a half hour procedure. With a thrombosed popliteal vein, it's more difficult.

So here's the view of the external iliac vein, and here's the longitudinal curl reformat, showing A, a very swollen limb, and B, the length of the thrombus. In this case, again, you'd use the same criss-cross technique.

But this time, we were going to attempt a thrombectomy above and below. And starting off, you put a little catheter in here. Niggle it down as far down as you can, and just flush inject five, 10 milligrams of TPA while you're setting up your thrombectomy device.

That usually takes a few minutes. And in that meantime, you then can get to work. And this is just after five to 10 minutes of tissue plasminogen activator. You opened up some segment here. Then you get to work

with, as it happens in this case, the AngioJet. Not perfect, because our puncture points are very close to each other, but you can appreciate that we do have rapid inline flow. And this is over the course of 45 minutes or so. We're now up to about an hour

with, I think that's a Cook Zilver venous stent going from south to north. And this is his CTV, with a filter in situ. At six months, he has a widely patent vein. And the same on the sagittal reformat. You can appreciate that the stent is widely open.

In summary, there's pros and cons to both. First of all, you have to believe that the popliteal vein matters in terms of inflow. I do, I believe that inflow matters in terms of most vascular procedures. CDT is less labor intensive but costs more,

and there are the risks of thrombolysis. Pharmaco-mechanical thrombectomy is faster, and you can do all of your work in one go. But it certainly takes two hours of your time. Posterior tibial vein is more difficult than it it looks. There's lots of ways to skin this particular cat

and Fabritzio and I wrote a little book last year. If you're interested, you can learn more. Thank you so much.

- I have no disclosures. - So the eye lens is a highly radiosensitive tissue. And the radiation damage is a cataract, this is a cancer-like pathology resulting from mutating events. It's a posterior sub-capsular cataract. And in several studies we have seen quite a large number of interventionalists or vascular surgeons or cardiologists

showing this exact type of posterior lens changes, characteristic of radiation exposure. About half of the interventionalists in this study. The risk increases with duration of work years and decreases with regular use of protection. So the conclusion in this paper was

that radiation injuries to the lens can be avoided. By, for example, reducing the dose. So this is obvious that we should do in every way we can do it. And there are many steps shown in this excellent paper published in the European Journal of Vascular Surgery.

And, on top of that, of course, use radiation shields. And I've been focused today on different eye shields. So we tested the eye dose reduction with several commercially-available protection glasses and shields during realistic endovascular procedures in an experimental setting,

using phantoms and dosimeters at the front of the eyes, the left and the right eyes. And this was an EVAR protocol using a Siemens C-arm. So we tested the more modern sports glasses. The reduction to the left eye was only 15 to 50 percent, or in some glasses just 10 to 15 percent.

So much, much lower than what's promised in the brochure. The fit over glasses protected best, especially if you don't use them over personal glasses. So this is because of the, it's if there is just a small gap between the cheek and the glasses, there's scattered radiation pulsing in there.

And it also scatters on your face up to the eye lens. We also tested visors and you can see the effect of having them at a correct angle. They should be downward-angled, and you have a pretty good protection. But the best of all was the ceiling-mounted shield,

if it's properly used with a very high reduction, 90 to 95 percent. So this is an image from our hospital. I'm in the middle with these fit-over glasses that we have all now beginning to use. So in this paper, it was nicely shown that the position

of the shield also is very important. So it should be very tight to the patient and close to the femoral access. Other protective measures like these surgical drapes, we use them and there is a good additive reduction of radiation exposure

to the chest and hands, shown by this paper. But no one has ever related the reduction to the head or the eye. And the latest addition in our center is this zero-gravity suit that has been shown to significantly reduce radiation exposure

to the whole body, including the head and the eyes. So I think this is a very important new device. In this study, from the London group, we can see that adherence to use these kinds of shields is depressingly low. Use of lead-protective glasses was only 36 percent

among the operators and ceiling-mounted leaded shields, no one uses them, at that time at least. So, in conclusion, there are several radiation protection eyeglasses used today. They offer a highly limited dose reduction, giving a false sense of security.

A proper use of ceiling mounted lead shields is essential for adequate protection to the eye lens. And the protection eyeglasses and visors should only be used as a complement. And consider also using additional devices as full-body protection to maximize your protection, thank you.

perspective is why stroke is so you know hot right now I mean here's the number needed to treat means the number of patients you need to do to get an immeasurable outcome and so for lung

cancer screening programs where people are getting C T's of the chest to see if they have lung cancer you need to scan 217 patients okay mammograms right how you need to scan 84 you need to do 84 mammograms to find a

cancer all right what about PCI for STEMI so you need to treat 50 patients in order to save a life doing a STEMI then what about everyone knows what a defibrillator is I mean someone goes on the cardiac shock you need it treat

three people to save a life their stroke is two so you need to treat two people to save a life and making measurable outcome so that's why this is such an important procedure why everyone wants to do it because it's one of the most

effective therapies again if you pick the right patient and here are just different clots that we've taken out you know I used to take pictures a lot but it says that they come out you know sometimes they come out one piece

sometimes they come on multiple different pieces but that one that that case I just showed you is that middle square and it is really satisfying so for those of you who already do it I'm sure you guys are pretty familiar with

this this is more for those like me who never even saw a stroke case and saw what could what could you do now again time is brain and there's a big need now not all operators and there's a lot of drama in the whole field of who

should treat stroke neurosurgeons and neuro IR or something like where we should be the only ones doing it there's IRS like me said no we can do it there's cardiologists who want to do it so it's a lot of drama right now but there's a

need not by just based on numbers even if all neuro IRS and neurosurgeons did it they can't manage to do all the strokes so there's a need and we're in the process of trying to figure out some guidelines

and stuff like that with SAR that paper is going to be released in the next we next month or two but we we are showing that even a body you know trained person can learn it but just defining by doing it appropriately

you know again the need is there because all these centers when you drip in shit meaning you give TPA and then you ship them out to another Center you lose a lot of time time is brain you lose two hours that's a lot think about two

million brain cells per minute so you know EMTs are in charge of where you're taking them and it's getting so much attention that even Wall Street Journal brought out this article last year in in 2018 it said you know the stroke care is

amazing but you might not get it if you go to the wrong hospital so it's something that's you're gonna see a lot more in the next couple of years and you know we're working on on the drama side of it - we finally were able to change

Jake owes mind and now Jake o is on board of having da di ours to it so that was like a big win but you know I I know plenty of people who feel very strongly against you know people like me doing it but I think it's just you had a show

that you can do it safely so and you know this was I took this these slides from David sacks and who runs loose sar stroke course which is actually gonna be in a couple of days and he just runs the numbers and when you look at the numbers

you know that there you need like ano strokes so we need people and you know I think I bought e i RZ you do have enough training you just need to be taught and

mentored now there's a plenty of articles to that show that it's effective and safe so I'm just showing these because a lot of times I RS are scared like to do it and especially they're not trained but they can and

again the guidelines will be out very very soon so this was this is the this is the old statement this was in 2009 so that 2019 which I became part of - is and these are all the authors of it so again

that's gonna really change some of the landscape - and help people get trained we're sending up training and everything as well now our our techs and nurses also had to learn how to how to manage stroke patients and everything they all

loved it now - so I'm just gonna end

you know the most common procedures in China this is kind of interesting I was blown away by this when I did the research on this I knew when I would go

into the hospitals and I was all over for I've been to Beijing shanghai nanjing to even the smallest little place is up in northern china and the one thing that blew me away I'm looking at the board and I'm seeing neuro case

after neuro case after neuro case I'm like it got 10 Narrows and and a pic line I'm like it's an interesting interesting Dysport of cases and the reason being is in China they consider diagnostic neuro

so neuro angio to be the primary evaluating factor for any type of neurological issue so you're not getting a CT if you come in with a headache you think you're gonna go get that cat scan now it's generally what not what they do

so you're talking about a case and I'll give you the case matrix of the break-up it's just proportionately high for a neuro very well trained in neuro and most of the guys that are trying to neuro very similar to what dr. well Saad

said a lot of the guys in Africa are trained in France so other neuro interventions have trained in France or lipstick in China and have received European training on that so you know the level of what they're doing some of

the stroke interventions some of the ways they're going after these complex APM's they'll Rob well anything you'll see here in the US so it is quite interesting to see and the second

largest is taste hepatocellular carcinoma is on the rise it's the highest level in the world is found in China and Korea for that matter and there's many reasons why we can go into it some of it is genetic factors and a

lot of societal factors alcohol is a very liberally lie baited in China and there is problems with you know cirrhotic disease and other things that we know could be particular factors for HCC so always found that very

interesting like I said I would go into a hospital and I'll see a PICC line a hemodialysis catheter and then 20 tase's on the board in one day so it is quite interesting how they do it and then biliary intervention stents tips and

then lung ablation you know the highest rates of HCC biliary cancer and lung cancer found in China and once again when we talk about lung cancer what are those contributing factors you're talking about certainly a genetic

component but mostly it's lifestyle factors smoking is prevalent in the US and in you know in Europe and in some areas in Asia we've seen obviously a big reduction in smoking which is fantastic China not so much you don't see that

it's a societal thing for them and unfortunately that has led to the the largest rates of cancer in the world in lung cancer so lung ablation is a big procedure for them over there as well so procedure breakdown this is kind of some

of that breakdown I was telling you about that cerebral procedure is some of the most commonly performed and you're talking about at very large numbers they're doing neuro intervention because they do it for die

Gnostic purposes and I would that kind of blew me away when I found out they do have cast scanners and certainly for trauma and things like that they'll do it but the majority of the stuff if you come in you have headaches you might end

up in the neuro suite so it's quite interesting how they can do that tumor intervention very high like I said you have the highest rates of HCC in the world you're getting cases they do have y9t available and in fact China just

made their largest acquisition ever with the by what you guys know a company they bought surtex there's a Chinese company now it got bought by China now the interesting is they don't currently have a whole lot of

y9t over there but they just opened up some of their own generators so they can actually start producing the white room 90 and I think you'll see probably a increase in those numbers of y9t cases but to date the number one procedure for

them is taste and they do a lot of them you know like I said on average a community hospital setting you might find 15 or 20 cases a day with three interventionalists so compared to what you guys do there's probably not many

people here unless you're working at a major institution that there's nothing but cancer doing 20 cases a day and I promise you're probably not doing it with only two interventionalists so it's amazing how fast and effective they've

gotten at and below therapy and unfortunately it is necessary because of those elevated HCC levels and like I said when we look at some of these things it's I go over there and I'm looking at the board there are very few

cases for you know PICC lines very few the frosted grams very new bread-and-butter abscess training procedures like we do here in the US they are very it's the prevalence is very simple it's neuro it stays and it's

biopsy and those are some kind of the big three for intervention in China and there it's such a large volume you get to learn a lot when you're over there and CLI PA D even though it's more prevalent in China than it is here

because smoking lifestyle factors certainly westernization of the diet in China which occurred since the 1950s and 60s has led to a lot of McDonald's and and fast food and things that weren't currently available prior to 1950s you

see a lot of PA d but it is very undertreated and certainly talking to some of my colleagues like whom are oh you'll get to see a little bit later on with CLI fighters one of the things that's kind of frustrating for them is

that it is so undertreated it's very common to see amputations in China instead of actually doing pipe in percutaneous intervention they normally like to go too far and you see a lot of amputation certainly above

normal so that's something I think as an interventional initiative when we look at these things coming from a Western perspective it's definitely something we need to pursue a little more aggressively but there it's very little

oh well you're talking about two you know two to three percent you know maybe up to six percent or PID cases very very low levels so equipment in equipment in

positron emission tomography is the use

of a radioactive tracer in this case FD gee her fluorodeoxyglucose to assess the metabolic activity of ourselves ftg is tagged with glucose and glucose is used by our body for energy cancer cells are thought to be our Armour hypermetabolic

so if we inject FDG to our patients it goes to areas with hyper metabolic activity this area is called a hotspot and when a hotspot is noted in a PET scan its it's thought to be cancerous this is an example of a hyper metabolic

region noted in the pelvic area of the patient this patient is diagnosed of cervical cancer and what is MRI as you all know MRI is the use of radio frequency currents produced by strong magnetic fields to provide detailed

anatomical structures it is the preferred method for imaging soft tissue organs and there's no ionizing radiation present now what is pet MRI pet MRI is a combination of these two modalities instead of going to two scans using two

scanners we have one scanner that is able to obtain pet and MRI images simultaneously so why can't we just call this pet well we run through a few problems we have fdg-pet CT where it's a PET scan with low-dose CT accompanying

it and there's fdg-pet CT with diagnostic CT we're full sequences of CT is coupled with a scan and a pet MRI always has a diagnostic MRI done with it

so we're just gonna like hop over to the clinic side and kind of discuss how we work up or what are the things we look for when we see the patients in clinic

so a lot of patients are referred to us by urologist so we have to have a urology on board to to better take care of this patient we can't treat this patient you know by ourselves so a lot of patients are referred to us by our

neurology team if they don't have a urologist we have to refer to them to erosions first before we can even work them up or PAE so we won't make sure that patient you know doesn't have any underlying cancer that we know of so we

want to make sure that we check their PSA levels because this high high patient can ask actually I predict a decent progression and actually our risk for acute urinary retention you want to make sure that you get

urinalysis a lot of patience wet with lots is not only due to pph you could also be secondary to UTI or if patient has some type of bladder tumor or bladder disorder so it's kind of good to know to understand some of the lingo

that urology uses so once they see the urologist they do some your dynamic studies and one of the popular ones are these non-invasive studies called euro flama tree and the post-void residual do you offer the Euro excuse me you heard

from a tree usually we will measure the flow rate and the volume of the patients so what they do is they they would pee in this special funnel and the final obviously they go in private but this final is connected to some machine that

can actually measures how fast and how much their voiding and so normally it's about 25 miles per second but if it's anywhere less than 13 to 15 it can suggest obstruction and use the obstructions usually due to BPH some of

us a very low flow rate such as like say less than ten or six you have you want to be a suspicious of some type of you to neutral structure after they do that usually what they'll do is they take a post void residual is basically scan so

they'll put that little probe above the bladder and they'll see how much is left in a bladder if it's 150 that she usually indicates in complete emptying someone who has greater than 200 that may suggest patients having some type of

bladder dysfunction so a lot of its patients to us at least woke up with some type of imaging and the ones that at least our physician selects is the MRI patient do get a CT angiogram which can also evaluate the pelvic Anatomy and

arteries however the process the mr process actually gives a better illustration of the prostate a tissue to see if there's any suspicious for cancer for example you can also display the president atomy and characteristic up

the gland so most patients do get MRI or at least we get them to get MRI to measure the actual volume in literature they will tell you that a patient can get a trance rectal ultrasound but I'm not sure how many

guys in here would like a probe stuck up their butt to get to get their prostate measured so unless you wanted to get pissed at you just supporter I am right so when we see the patient you obviously want to review their HMP more

importantly you'll want to check their comorbidities there's social history whether it is smoke or not because they're gonna that's gonna have an impact on how we stay patients and how you can predict their anatomies

obviously someone's died who is diabetic or who has a history of smoking you could expect for them to have a greater degree of atherosclerosis and again the first thing that we would get the patient why we walked in is we go in

that scoresheet the IPSS score and so that's gonna give us an idea of how bad this symptoms are so if they come in to us with a score of say you know they're mildly symptomatic I'm not sure how much to pee a procedure with would help them

because how much more lower can we get their scores down so a lot of patients we would treat are in the moderate to severe category and their quality of life score should be for the most part will be about three or higher you also

want to make sure the trusted results since this is Andrew Graham procedures you will make sure that they have a pretty decent renal function patients with lots a lot of them may have some degree of renal insufficiency so we have

to be careful make sure we watch that lab value so this is some of the screening criteria that a lot of us may use so patients who I have refractory to medications for the six months someone has a high IPSS core grain 13 or

qualifies score greater than three process volumes gotta be at least 40 grams we sometimes get patients with a high score but they're positive volumes around 30 we usually usually wouldn't treat those

patient because we can't basically treat or shrink the prostate any any lower than that you someone who has an abnormal urine Flo and someone who maybe refractor to medical therapy these are just a list of

exclusion criteria the ones that should my party set out someone who has prostatitis or current approximate infection you definitely want don't want to treat those patients chronic renal failure and relatively maybe coagulation

factors that could be patient dependent sometime sometimes we could optimize them to get this arteriogram procedure and prostate and bladder malignancy also this somewhat also relative we do treat patients with prostate cancer it just

depends on what course of treatment they're on currently so once we had screen the patients and and deemed them to be a candidate we reviewed the patient we review in detail the procedure with the patient so you want

to let them know that it's a our angiogram procedure that will go through the either the growing or sometimes the radio and the procedure itself you can take anywhere from one for one to four hours and sometimes longer depending on

how complicated their arteries feeding the prosthetist more importantly we want to educate them about the side effects okay we have to let them know that a lot of their symptoms might actually worsen during the first few days after the

procedure so if they have the Syria now urinary continence they actually may get really worse especially for the first few days okay we have to go over the complication with the patients that can include a public infection ischemia or

any vessel related complications that pseudoaneurysm or bleeding so we have to basically have a basic knowledge of how do we combat this side effects and these are just some of the list of side effects that

are mentioning or at least we also used a PI radium it helps I guess to numb up the prostate urethra we have to educate the patient that this can change the color of the urine so we always make a note to our patients that if you are

going to take this medication please call us that way we don't kind of shock you and we also know that the change of color is from the pair radium and not from anything else the tripping or oxybutynin

it helps reduce bladder spasm we would normally use it for a patient who go somewhere to Foley our patients would go some Foley tends to have a great degree of bladder spasm Coley's a lot of spatially get constipated for multiple

reasons being better that or they and she is soft and there's also the over-the-counter azem so this is just a sum of the standard medications that we would give all our patients all of them will get about cipro for seven days

we'll give them some type of anti-inflammatory Asia usually is ibuprofen were prescribed 800 a tid if needed anti-acids since it's just to protect your belly or their stomach from the ibuprofen minimum we'll get a stool

softener at least for the first three days or if they got developed loose toast and we would ask them to stop it and the medications for pain that we would get them as Norco just in case and I would say like more than half these

patients don't even need Norco at best they'll probably use ibuprofen you know just to minimize the inflammatory side effects that I get it also helps out with post embolization that sometimes we'll get and I believe so I don't I'm

not sure if I'm messing about post embolization syndrome patient do can get these symptoms and a lot of symptoms can vary they can get some body slug or fever malaise and the degree the symptoms were may bear from patient to

patient and a lot of symptoms are described kind of like a flu-like symptoms and we also want to reiterate a patient that the symptoms are temporary and it should get better over to at least at first week or so so patients on

warfarin we have a lot of patients on warfarin for whatever reason whether they had a recent cardiac intervention we want to assure that we stop those medications at least before the edge ground procedure so it's very important

that you have a good rapport or whoever and have prescribed him the coumadin whether it's a cardiologist or the surgical team and a lot of dissipation may need to be crossover outside like a short-acting

anticoagulation such as Lobo Knox at least in our practice we ask the patient to this condition discontinue your aspirin unless they're you know they have a recent cardiac intervention we may leave it leave them

on aspirin metformin as very important since we did it is a natural procedure we want to at least hold have the patient hold the metformin the morning of the procedure and maybe a couple of days after and someone who are

allergic to contrasts we will make sure that we're prepared to premedicate a patient and also be prepared in case there's a severe reaction and the pre medication as we know will give them some type of a standard metal prednisone

will they'll take it like twelve seven or one hour before and they also gets unbearable and preoperatively or one hour before the procedure and during the clinic we also determine the level of anesthesia so since this procedure

usually takes a long time we always get it with our anesthesia team is just more for patient comfort it's not really for pain okay I couldn't imagine laying a table for several hours at the time so we all shop anesthesia on board just

really for patient comfort so we're just

- Thank you very much. I'd like to thank Dr. Veith for the opportunity to be here and give a quick smattering in four minutes and a quarter. I have no disclosures. So despite the well-documented benefits of straightforward catheter-directed thrombectomy, it remains slow. It can several days and we need speed.

So, devices for physical removal of clots, disruption of clot, large volume removal, and/or combinations of above have certainly been developed. So, with regards with physical removal, aspiration devices, the number of which we'll have several speakers following, the CAT series is by far the

best example of it, if you will. Suction device connected to a continuous pump. Unfortunately, if offers poor transition into the wire. You have to advance in bare. Particularly when you're doing arteries, this can be concerning.

As you advance the thing, you can't tell if the clot is actually removed or not removed, so sometimes you can push it forward. If you've ever used the device, you've seen this. And clogging requires the entire remov

and thus, and you have to put it back through the artery and start all over again. And the concept of continuous removal with a pump is good for suction, but unfortunately, you can remove up to 160 cc's with just 20 seconds of using the device, as it doesn't have a reperfusion system.

The Aspire Mechanical is sort of a low-tech version, a manual aspiration device, where you have a pump that you manually pump up to start negative pressure. You can advance the catheter. The nice thing, you can connect it to literally anything.

If you can get a catheter in there, you screw it in and away you go. You're less likely to have extreme blood loss. You're unable to adjust the suction, unfortunately. And it's not really clear if the suction is actually working or not working.

The pump is on, you know that. But if you pumped it two or three times, is it sucking or not sucking? There's no actual feedback. The AngioVac is the most powerful or large-volume aspiration system.

It's filtered through a veno-veno extracorporeal pump. You can get a big circuit in there. You can do vena cavas, you can do iliacs, it's great. But you have to set up this very complex system. You require, what I'm going to put here as massive sheaths. So if you ever think about doing this in arteries,

you really can't do it. You need a 24-french sheath to put the device in, and then you need at least an 18 or a 20 to put the volume back in. So unfortunately, for arteries, you're going to have to put a conduit in,

and you're going to have to advance it bare through an artery. The extracorporeal filter pump is very expensive and it's not reimbursed. A lot of institutions will either let you use it a few times until they realize how much it costs, and then you're only going to be reimbursed for a thrombectomy.

With regards with mechanical, the Arrow-Trerotola is probably the most powerful and classic mechanical clot disrupter. It's got a spinning cable that looks like this, the new version. And it can damage native vessels,

so it's designed only for grafts. However, it can also get entangled in wires and stents, so even though the black box warning says don't do it, it doesn't keep people from trying it and having multiple attempts. And this is something that we had to remove once

from a graft because it was all entangled in the wire, and it could neither be pushed in or pulled out. It causes embolic materials. It spins inside, and we've never really manned up or womanned up and looked at what happens to the lungs when we fracture all this stuff.

Combination systems, like the Angiojet, is nice 'cause it can shoot out TPA and spray out a saline and break things up. And also, it has a negative pressure, which causes Bernoulli effect to extract clot. The upside is that it removes soft clot

through small side holes. We love it. It's fast, it sprays saline. However, it can also damage vessel walls. At some point, we've read and/or done ruptured in a thin vessel.

And of course, there's a black box warning against pulmonary. But also, if you've ever used it in a cadaveric graft, you'll do it once, and then they'll come back a month later, and now you have this diffused aneurysmal destruction of your bypass.

It also causes hemolysis. Typically, if you look at a Foley catheter, this is what your urine starts with at the bottom and what your urine ends with at the end. And both my group and Dr. Kashyap, who will be following, have assumed that it may not be good for the kidney.

I'll let him continue with that. So in summary, be judicious when you're choosing your approach. Continue to consider the potential downsides of each product. Risk/benefit ratio based on the patient.

Patient has renal dysfunction, limited outflow, sheath size. Old school lysis may be the way to go. Just look at it and maybe you don't have to do a fancy device every time. Or, actually, go with an open thrombectomy.

Mechanical thrombectomy is thus not like a car. When you're looking at these different options and say, "Gosh. You know, maybe it is faster, but perhaps I should think about it." But if somebody offers you this, there's no conceivable downside.

I would go with it. Thank you very much.

- Thank you very much, Professor Torsello, dear Chairmen, ladies and gentlemen. After the publication of the PERICLES Registry, collecting the published world-wide experience from 13 US and European centers, a nonindustry founded project, we focused on several appealing topics,

which have to do with the chimney technique, and I would like to present you a nice overview of these new findings. Here is a flowchart, you see. After the publication of the PERICLES Registry, five new topics and publications,

and let's start and speak about the gutters. So regarding gutters, this is always a nice topic to be discussed after ch-EVAR, also presented as Achilles' heel of the technique, we classified the phenomenon of gutters based on causative mechanisms,

so we found three, as you see here, patterns, which are responsible for the persistence gutters type 1A endoleak, so two of them have to do with the oversizing, so we have seen cases with excessive oversizing of more than 30% of the aortic stent graft,

leads to this enfolding of the device, and this is a reason for our persistent endoleak as we see here. Another crucial causative mechanism is the undersized aortic endograft, which is often to be seen in case of large neck diameters or multiple chimneys,

so you see that in these cases, we have a gap. We don't have enough fabric material to wrap up the chimney grafts, and we have a persistent type 1 endoleak, and third reason for these phenomenon is a very short sealing zone.

The next key point, or the next appealing topic, was the incidence and factors for several vascular events after ch-EVAR. We published that in JVS. We analyzed this phenomenon, and actually we found a really low incidence of clinical relevant

cerebrovascular events of almost 2%. What we have seen in a very nice analysis is that the bilateral axis from the upper extremity seems to have a significant association with cerebrovascular events, and this is how we perform and administer a double chimney, so we avoid the exposure of the right

and the left upper extremity artery. We prefer the exposure of the axillary artery and double puncture, avoiding the bilateral access from above. Another nice topic is the treatment of type 1A endoleaks after EVAR.

The group from Rome published that in JEVT, and here is an example showing the utility of this technique in type 1A endoleaks. We have mainly migration of the device due to undulated necks as we see here, and for these anatomies the chimney technique performs well

because we use flexible tubes. As here you can see the Endurant device with single chimney for the right renal artery, so we create a new sealing zone, and we treat the challenging pathology like that, or here a ruptured triple A due to type 1A endoleak,

which treated also here again with tube and single chimney for the right renal artery, and we see here no evidence of type 1 endoleak in the follow-up. Another important point was the identification of optimal device combination.

The group from Florida published this topic in JVS in 2018, and we identified that the combination of the Endurant and the Advanta, a combination of a nitinol endoskeleton with a stainless steel, balloon-expandable copper stents, have a significant better performance

regarding mortality and patency as we see here in these very nice overview of the Kaplan-Meier curves. Last but not least, the impact of the technique in gender is also important. We know from the published literature from the group from Professor Timaran that female patients have

a greater risk for more renal function deterioration, reintervention, if they be treated by FEVAR. So we sought to analyze these phenomenon or these option with the chimney technique, and here is an overview between male and female patients. You see that the female patients underwent mostly placement

of flexible self-expanding covered stent, probably due to the tortuosity of the renal arteries, and if we see the outcomes, we didn't observe significant differences between female and male patients regarding the 30-day mortality renal failure late type 1A endoleaks, but also regarding

the chimney graft patency and reintervention, and this is probably to be explained due to the fact that we use devices with a low profile, flexible devices which probably fits better in the anatomy of the female patients as we see here. So in summary, we have seen that the use of chimneys

for juxtarenal pathologies has benefits for female patients showing no statistical differences regarding mortality, renal failures, patency and complications rate. So the new findings about ch-EVAR from the PERICLES Registry cohort were based in the classification of gutter-related endoleaks.

We have seen low incidence of clinical-driven cerebrovascular events, and it looks that the bilateral access as in case of multiple chimneys has a high risk of increased MACE rate, and successful use of this approach in excessive type 1A endoleaks and also female patients with triple A with short necks.

Thank you very much for your attention.

is example as I mentioned about doing very large ablation so this is a lady who hadn't malignant melanoma and she

had metastases to liver we basically placed six probes into this mass as you can see there on that CT the image on the right is the appearance of those six probes it's all excited about how many probes I placed in this patient

like it's a game and then I just watched an ablation talk with a guy put 16 in so that didn't really make me feel much better so so we have six probes here and you can see what we what you do when you have lesions that are in the soft

tissues and you're worried about freezing to the skin you can have injury to the skin right essentially frostburn and so frostbite sorry and so what you can do is you can take either a warm glove fill it up with saline and put it

with the fingers amongst the probes so it keeps the skin warm because you don't want to freeze the skin or what people are doing sometimes as well as they've just put some gauze around all the probes and they spray that goes with

warm saline I just take one of those leader bags of saline put it in the microwave for a couple minutes and then just fill fill the bowl up with it and just spray the gauze on that or you can do the glove technique the main idea

here once again is you don't want to get skin injury when you do these and as you can see a pretty sizable ablation around that entire tumor you can even see the lightening sign which is the low attenuation sort of lightening looking

structures within the ice ball which is cracking of the ice ball as you form but you will see what this is immediately after the procedure the patient will have a very hard ice ball under their chest and it takes about an hour

for that to melt so if you notice bleeding off towards or what is perceived as bleeding before you panic you should realize that that ice pole is going to melt and it's going to come out the holes seep out of the holes that you

created so oftentimes if it's sort of a blood tinge fluid that's really just the ice ball melting in the fluid coming out of the the sites that you've punctured

my last case here you have a 54 year old patient recent case who had head and neck cancer who presents with severe bleeding from a tracheostomy alright for some bizarre reason we had two of these

in like a week all right kind of crazy so here's the CT scan you can see the asymmetry of the soft tissue this is a patient who had had a neck cancer was irradiated and hopefully what you can notice on the

right side of the screen is the the large white circles of contrast which really don't belong there they were considered to be pseudo aneurysms arising from the carotid artery all right that's evidence of a bleed he was

bleeding out of his tracheostomy site so here's a CTA I think the better image is the image on the right side of the screen the sagittal image and you can see the carotid artery coming up from the bottom and you can see that round

circle coming off of the carotid artery you guys see that so here's the angiogram all that stuff that is to the right to the you know kind of posterior to the right of the screen there it doesn't belong there that's just

contrast that's exiting the carotid artery this is a carotid blowout we'll call it okay just that word sounds bad all right so that's bad so another question right what do you want to do here

I think embolization is reasonable but probably not the thing we can do the fastest to present a patient to treat a patient is bleeding out of the tracheostomy site so in this particular case this is a great covered stent case

alright and here's what it looked like after so we can go right up and just literally a cover sent right across the origin of that pseudoaneurysm and address the patient's bleeding alright

- [Presenter] Thank you very much. This is Jordan. It's my pleasure to share this panel with endoanchors believers, I'm one of them. So, there's my disclosures. The scope of the problem about the proximal migration starts

in order to think about the durability of thoracic endografting, because it still is a concern. The cranial migration from the distal attachment is part of this particular concern, especially when the distal neck length is less than three centimeter.

I think this is a under-reported complication in these areas. That is, what has happened, after some kind of follow-up, after four years follow-up, the distal part of the aorta, or the distal part of the endograft is dis-attached from the primary landing zone.

Because all the forces in the ascending thoracic aorta acting in the up cranial fashion. So when you are virtually sure there some kind of migration rate of two years but also have some kind of cranial migration from the distal part of the aorta at the one year is 1.2%

for the VALOR trial and 1% in one year also for the TX2 trial. In our experience, before 2006, for distal neck length, between 1.5 to 3 centimeter in length, 60% of cranial migration rate was registered at five years follow-up. So what's a lot of percent about that we try to perform

a different kind of approach for those particular short or no short, nice distal neck of thoracic aorta. So cranial migration as previously mentioned is under-reported. The upside for the abdominal aorta with the forces acting in the downstream anteriorly in the thoracic one is

posteriorly a cranial and also a cranial migration course. And this kind of phenomenon kind of course in the long run follow-up. These connections and also cranial migration. About the preventative actions there are different kind of creative alternative in order to prevent that,

but let me to focalize my attention and your attention to endoanchors philosophy that is part of our current approach. For a regular neck of more than three centimeters we can use regular endograft but sometimes when it's not so regular it's not so straight, we prefer to use in combination

with endoanchors. When you have a regular straight but between 1.5 and 3 centimeter we prefer to use distal scalloped endograft plus endoanchors as you cam see here. That is what the speakers talk about very extensively but this is just a case in order to see

what happened after two years follow-up in this lady when it has this distal type one endolink we apply the endoanchors and after three years the endoanchors remain in the same position, as you can see here, without any kind of further complications.

So another example, in combination with scalloped devices, scalloped thoracic endograft, just in order to be sure, that the movement in the distal part doesn't occur or even weaken over time. For sure, when you have very short neck length,

that means less than 1.5 centimeter, then we need to switch to another kind of solution like this fenestrated or branched endograft, like you can see here in this example. So in summary, the durability of thoracic endografting remains a concern when cranial migration is a consequence

of biomechanical forces of the thoracic aorta and it is under-reported. The proximal and distal necks deserve equal attention. And many different approaches have been suggested to avoid cranial migration. And endoanchors in combination with the scalloped,

fenestrations and branched endografts should be applied more often. Thank you very much.

- (Speaker) Thank you very much So we're going to try to tackle all of these issues. I do have some disclosures. The indigo system that we're going to talk about does have FDA approval in the vascular system. It is contraindicated for neurovascular and coronary use although there are specific catheters made by this company

for use in those areas, so we're going to talk about the use strictly in the periphery. So we know that Acute Limb Ischemia requires revascularization and we use this Power Aspiration system, we call it XTRACT, using the Indigo system for a number of different therapeutic options.

The device we're talking about, these are reinforced catheters so there's no collapsing of the tip during aspiration. They're atraumatic, this technology was developed and really pirated in some way from stroke work, where we were putting these catheters in the

middle cerebral artery, so these catheters track, it's exceptionally rare to see any vessel damage. We have not dissected any vessels in over 120 cases. The catheters are hooked up to direct tubing to a small handheld pump,

which is easy to use, which sucks, an essentially true vacuum, so that you get maximal aspiration. And, they come in different sizes: 3, 5, 6, and 8 French and you can see there's a large increase in aspiration power as we go up

in size. So this would be a typical case where we have an SFA occlusion, in the distal SFA. There's also a TP trunk occlusion. There's an anterior tib. which is a stump distally. And we don't see any real flow below the TP trunk.

Here we can take a CAT6, we place it in the clot. It's very simple to use. The learning curve here is extremely low. You turn the vacuum on, you just be patient and wait. You don't run this through the clot, and if you suck this way and be patient,

embolization is extremely rare, and I'll show you some of that data. We clean that up as I showed you, then we advance down into this tibioperoneal trunk, and after two or three minutes of aspiration with some gentle catheter moving,

we're able to clear up the TP trunk, we can come back and balloon the underlying lesions and leave this patient who had no runoff, essentially with two vessel runoff. In Press right now, we're actually online, published, and in print, are the results of the PRISM trial,

which is using this system as a retrospective registry, and this is used in 79 patients after failed thrombolysis, as a primary device for acute limb ischemia, for distal emboli caused by other interventional procedures such as angioplasty stem placement.

We looked at patients who had little flow or no flow, TIMI 0-1, and basically we evaluated the flow before. We use this system after we use the system and after any other adjunctive intervention. And along the bottom you can see that we restored flow,

excellent flow, TIMI 2 or 3 flow, and 87% percent of the patients, after the final intervention, so treating the underlying lesion, 96% of patients had essentially normal flow. So, 87% as I say success

just with the device alone, and then using adjunct devices. There were no serious adverse events. The complications from this include vasospasm. We did not have any vessel dissections, or vascular injuries, and

no serious event directly related to the catheter. So where do we use this? Well, we can use this as I mentioned for acute limb ischemia. We can use it as a primary therapy for embolic occlusions. We can use it after iatrogenic emboli.

We use it after incomplete thrombolysis when there's residual clot, so we don't have to lyse someone up further. We can save lysis time and money overnight. And we've expanded our uses out of the arterial and now we're looking at venous, pulmonary, mesenteric,

and dialysis applications. We just published our results in the pulmonary circulation from the single center. There's a retrospective study that's been completed, and now a prospective study which we're just beginning right now.

We actually have our first sites up and ready. We've had experience with DVT, and we're also using this in the mesenteric and portal circulation. A quick image of a before and after on a pulmonary embolism. There's an extensive mass of patient who came in with profound hypotension,

post-using the XTRACT system. So the benefits, simple and easy to use, highly trackable. Limitations, blood loss if you don't know how to use this right. You just can't run this vacuum in flowing blood. Once you learn that and control the switch

blood loss can be minimized. As I mentioned, the learning curve is small. A few tips, not to use the separator much in the arterial system. Just be patient with your suction. Be careful damaging the tip when you introduce it

through the sheath, there's an introducer. In conclusion, we think this is an effective method to primarily treat arterial occlusions, venous pulmonary occlusions, and more data will be coming to you on the venous and pulmonary sides but I think in the arterial side,

we actually have several publications out, demonstrating safety and ethicacy. Thank you.

terms of imaging my favorite aspect of cryoablation is the fact that you can see the ice ball very well on CT and most procedures are done with CT guidance right so as you can see this is

a renal ablation the probe has been placed you can see the ice bowl forming around the probe right so that's very predictable you can see exactly where it is the only problem with cryoablation is that that ice bowl is not

necessarily the lethal ice ball right so that maximal ice ball is really your zero Degree and in actual fact the lethal zone is about five millimeters in from that so anytime you do a cryoablation you want to weigh over

freeze essentially to get those margins that you want so that's one important thing to remember the ice ball is not the lethal it's really five millimeters short of that okay so a little more information by cryoablation you don't

have to spend too much time on this but the idea is that the more energy you put in the larger ice ball you can get and so essentially more probes you place can just supplement that energy to increase the size of the ice ball so advantages

- The only disclosure is the device I'm about to talk to you about this morning, is investigation in the United States. What we can say about Arch Branch Technology is it is not novel or particularly new. Hundreds of these procedures have been performed worldwide, most of the experiences have been dominated by a cook device

and the Terumo-Aortic formerly known as Bolton Medical devices. There is mattering of other experience through Medtronic and Gore devices. As of July of 2018 over 340 device implants have been performed,

and this series has been dominated by the dual branch device but actually three branch constructions have been performed in 25 cases. For the Terumo-Aortic Arch Branch device the experience is slightly less but still significant over 160 device implants have been performed as of November of this year.

A small number of single branch and large majority of 150 cases of the double branch repairs and only two cases of the three branch repairs both of them, I will discuss today and I performed. The Aortic 3-branch Arch Devices is based on the relay MBS platform with two antegrade branches and

a third retrograde branch which is not illustrated here, pointing downwards towards descending thoracic Aorta. The first case is a 59 year old intensivist who presented to me in 2009 with uncomplicated type B aortic dissection. This was being medically managed until 2014 when he sustained a second dissection at this time.

An acute ruptured type A dissection and sustaining emergent repair with an ascending graft. Serial imaging shortly thereafter demonstrated a very rapid growth of the Distal arch to 5.7 cm. This is side by side comparison of the pre type A dissection and the post type A repair dissection.

What you can see is the enlargement of the distal arch and especially the complex septal anatomy that has transformed as initial type B dissection after the type A repair. So, under FDA Compassion Use provision, as well as other other regulatory conditions

that had to be met. A Terumo or formerly Bolton, Aortic 3-branch Arch Branch device was constructed and in December 2014 this was performed. As you can see in this illustration, the two antegrade branches and a third branch

pointing this way for the for the left subclavian artery. And this is the images, the pre-deployment, post-deployment, and the three branches being inserted. At the one month follow up you can see the three arch branches widely patent and complete thrombosis of the

proximal dissection. Approximately a year later he presented with some symptoms of mild claudication and significant left and right arm gradient. What we noted on the CT Angiogram was there was a kink in the participially

supported segment of the mid portion of this 3-branch graft. There was also progressive enlargement of the distal thoracoabdominal segment. Our plan was to perform the, to repair the proximal segment with a custom made cuff as well as repair the thoracoabdominal segment

with this cook CMD thoracoabdominal device. As a 4 year follow up he's working full time. He's arm pressures are symmetric. Serum creatinine is normal. Complete false lumen thrombosis. All arch branches patent.

The second case I'll go over really quickly. 68 year old man, again with acute type A dissection. 6.1 cm aortic arch. Initial plan was a left carotid-subclavian bypass with a TEVAR using a chimney technique. We changed that plan to employ a 3-branch branch repair.

Can you advance this? And you can see this photo. In this particular case because the pre-operative left carotid-subclavian bypass and the extension of the dissection in to the innominate artery we elected to...

utilize the two antegrade branches for the bi-lateral carotid branches and actually utilize the downgoing branch through the- for the right subclavian artery for later access to the thoracoabdominal aorta. On post op day one once again he presented with

an affective co arctation secondary to a kink within the previous surgical graft, sustaining a secondary intervention and a placement of a balloon expandable stent. Current status. On Unfortunately the result is not as fortunate

as the first case. In 15 months he presented with recurrent fevers, multi-focal CVAs from septic emboli. Essentially bacteria endocarditis and he was deemed inoperable and he died. So in conclusion.

Repair of complex arch pathologies is feasible with the 3-branch Relay arch branch device. Experience obviously is very limited. Proper patient selection important. And the third antegrade branch is useful for later thoracoabdominal access.

Thank you.

- [Jean] Thank you, Will, thank you again, Frank, for inviting me to your symposium. I'm going to talk to you about this concept of the value of EndoAnchors and TEVAR, and if you talk about that, basically, you need to figure out if we can predict TEVAR failure. So we published, last year, the creation of a novel

that makes a severity grading score to assess thoracic aneurysm and see if we can actually predict the patient that will not behave nicely with a simple TEVAR. Here's an example of two scores. Patient with an ASG score of 24

and the other one with an ASG score of 43. And the top of the ASG score is all the way up to 57 if you have all the worst characteristic that is applied to the different region of the thoracic aorta. So we found by doing a ROC Curve analysis

that an ASG score of 24 was actually the cut off, and below 24 was the low score group. And 24 and higher were patients with the really bad, challenging anatomy. And those patients had only a 69% freedom

from postoperative endoleak, requiring re-intervention at two years. So this novel anatomic severity grading score can actually really successfully identify patients that are at increased risk of endoleak requiring re-intervention

and then it would make sense in those patients to potentially apply for prophylactic EndoAnchors. And this is what we did in this next study where we looked at only patients with a high ASG score. So we had 63 patients with those high scores. 40% had only TEVAR and under the 20 patients

had TEVAR and prophylactic EndoAnchors as well. And if you look at those patients that only had TEVAR and bad anatomy, we had a 58% chance of freedom from aortic related re-intervention at three years. The 62% freedom from Type I endoleak at three years.

But when you place prophylactic EndoAnchors you end up with an excellent result with 95 to 100% survival free from any of those two kind of problem. So this would be the value in using EndoAnchors and these are better to me now. The technique for the thoracic EndoAnchor

and compared to the abdominal is that we have the selection of three potential active guide size, 22, 32, 42. And we size it according to the size of the endograft. I say as an example of a patient with challenging anatomy that was the patient with the ASG score of 43. This patient had a hemiarch debranching

and then we went ahead and deployed the endograft and deployed the EndoAnchor at the inner arch. This is the completion angiogram after those prophylactic EndoAnchors. And there is no endoleaks at two years. This patient is now currently at over three year follow-up

no migration and no endoleak, despite an extremely challenging anatomy. You can also have another prophylactic indication is to prevent upward migration. If you look at the tapering of the thoracic endograft right above that celiac artery,

this is really an area that in fact in the Valor II trial, has really showed that a lot of patient have Type 1B endoleak after a few years. And by using circumferential placement of those EndoAnchors at the distal end of the TEVAR,

you can really prevent this upward migration and endoleak 1B formation. Now the technique it's really about the angle of attack. I think if you have a bad angle of attack, you will not be able to deliver properly. But when you have a real 90 degree perpendicular attack

of the endograft this is how you can safely deploy those EndoAnchors in the thoracic aorta. This is a deployment of the ascending aorta in an RAO view, so you can not only deploy at the inner curve, but you can also deploy EndoAnchor on the interior or posterior aspect of the arch

by deploying anchors with these special view with the barrel. When you look at the outer curve of the arch, this is an easy Zone 1 delivery. This is a more tricky Zone 1 delivery, but it also possible to deploy EndoAnchors

in the outer curve. Same thing when we have the sternum open to do a total arch debranching, we can deploy EndoAnchors in an antegrade fashion in Zone 0 and obtain also great result. Top 10 tips for EndoAnchors.

First is take the time for preoperative planning. Second one is wishful thinking will not create the landing zone. Sometimes you have to do some debranching to obtain a landing zone. Deliver the endograft accurately.

Do the aortic balloon molding first. You have to size the Aptus guide according to the endograft size. You have to undersize it when you want to use it at the level of the outer curve of the arch. You deploy two rows in TEVARs.

I always deploy three rows in arch because of the increase in hemodynamics at that level. I think a good place to learn to do TEVAR and EndoAnchors is the distal end near the celiac artery. And never start a challenging TEVAR case without EndoAnchors.

So in summary, EndoAnchors in TEVAR are done in imperfect landing zones, improve outcomes by decreasing Type I endoleaks and the need for aortic reinterventions. Safe and effective deployment of EndoAnchors really relies on simple techniques, device selection,

and the knowledge of the failure modes of doing TEVAR in those challenging zones. Thank you.

- [Lu Qingsheng] I have no disclosures. We know for indication of EVAR we need favorable proximal neck anatomy but if it not unfavorable maybe we are some Type 1a endoleak it's a serious complication for EVAR. So for prevent and treat Type 1a endoleak

especial for some juxtarenal aneurysm maybe we use the chimney fenestration branch and some sac bag. Could we find a simple safe cheap and effective method? So we find from open surgery we were introduced this fibrin glue

means its complex of thrombin and fibrinogen, it's used hemostasis in open surgery so we put that into inject that into the sac, we call it fibrin glue sac embolization. I will show you some cases.

For this case is very short neck and not quality of deck and after deploy the stent graft, of course very serious Type 1a endoleak. But fortunately, we put a catheter before we deploy the stent graft so this catheter is into the sac of the aneurysm

then we use up a long controlled blood flow and we inject from the catheter into the sac of the aneurysm and we inject the fibrin glue. And you can find the contrast not moved after we withdraw balloon. Then we do the angiogram.

We find no any endoleak. Another case showed is angulated neck as this patient. Of course after we deployed stent graft have a lot of endoleak. And we do again this technique. And control the balloon, control the blood flow,

then inject the fibrin glue, and we check all that and withdrew the balloon, there are no any movement about the sac. And we do the angiogram and no any endoleak. Till now, we did, we begin this technique 2002, so we follow long time that we can show it's safe.

So till now we treat 156 cases and proximal less then short proximal neck is 75 cases even some of less than 10 millimeters. And angulation more than 60 degree even some cases more than 75 degree.

Most of them more than 98% of patients' endoleak was resolved. And during our follow up, the mean time more than 100 months, only three patients died of aneurysm related sac enlargement.

The mean maxim aneurysm diameter decreased and no recurrent Type 1 endoleak so we have confidence that it's safe and no any sealant-related complication for example renal failure and aplasia other things. So we discuss the mechanism

it's not only embolization for endoleak but also coagulating all sac of aneurysm like this in shows how it worked. And we also measure the pressure in the sac. Intrasac pressure decreased significantly in treated cases. And how about that technique we need occlusion

proximal blood flow and protect branch ateliers and prevent distal embolization. And we also treated into the rupture aneurysm and it can treat any type of endoleak as these cases it's a rupture aneurysm we do the EVAR emergency.

And after we deploy this devices, we find this endoleak. We don't make sure which kind of endoleak but anyway we just do that, control the blood flow use the balloon then inject the fibrin glue in that.

And all the sac of aneurysm. Then we do the angiogram and endoleak disappeared. We'll be treat any type endoleak of the rupture EVAR we prevent rupture post-EVAR and we decreased abdominal compartment syndrome. So the conclusion is

fibrin glue sac embolization is a simple and effective treatment method. And this method could expand the current indication of EVAR. For selective the length maybe can to the 5 millimeters, angle maybe can to the 90 degree,

and for emergency we seen it should be into the older EVARs for rupture aneurysms. Thank you very much.

- [Dr. Vikram Kashyap] Thanks to Dr. Viets for the kind invitiation. Dr. Hotze and Dr. Calgoro, and thank you Dr. Escobar for that great introduction. Obviously, percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy's something that we all use. It hastens treatment, and we use it regularly

for both venous and arterial thrombosis. However, PMT has been linked to cases of reversible post-operative acute kidney injury. It's thought to be due to either the hemolysis and the deposition of red corpuscle elements into the kidney parenchyma, and it may actually also

potentiate contrast-induced nephrotoxicity. Clearly, PMT leads to mechanical breakdown, but the intravascular hemolysis is perhaps the concern. And as Dr. Escobar illuminated, clearly can reduce the time for catheter-directed thrombolysis

or overall thrombectomy, period. Catheter-directed thrombolysis on the other hand, chemical breakdown through, usually, the plasminogen system, with converting to plasma, and then fibrinolysis. But clearly, because of the risk of bleeding, we think about using PMT to decrease the CDT time.

Our hypothesis was that there is an increased incidence of renal dysfunction in patients undergoing PMT for treatment of an acute thrombus, compared to patients undergoing CDT alone. So this is a report- a single-center, retrospective study. 227 patients were reviewed.

145 patients were included into the study analysis. The excluded patients included patients that had acute kidney injury before their intervention, patients that were already end-stage renal patients on dialysis, and patients who that either inadequate or no follow-up data.

So of those 145-odd patients, one-third had arterial thrombosis, two-thirds had venous thrombosis, and as you can see in this pie graph, about half the patients had combination catheter directed thrombolysis

and percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy. 12 percent had CDT alone. 10 percent had PMT alone. And then 29 percent had PMT with pulse spray tPA in a single-setting intervention. We used the RIFLE Criteria to characterize

the severity of renal dysfunction after intervention. And in the RIFLE Criteria, you can see in these rows risk, injury, and failure. There's an increase in creatinine or a decrement in GFR and Loss and ESRD are obviously patients that go on to either temporary or permanent dialysis.

This was the incidence of renal dysfunction in this group. 20 percent in the patients that had PMT alone. With power pulse PMT TPA - 21 percent. With the combination PMT and catheter-directed thrombolysis - 14 percent. And with catheter-directed thrombolysis alone - zero percent

These were highly significantly different between these two groups and the CDT group with values as you can see here on the lower right. If we look at the RIFLE Criteria, none of these patients went on to permanent dialysis. They all had risk, injury, or failure,

which were decrements in GFR, or escalations in creatinine. In fact, all the patients were covered to their baseline renal function, but it took an average of 5.1 days. This lengthened their hospitalization. And all 22 patients that had renal dysfunction

had either PMT alone or PMT combination therapy. If you look at the procedural of variables in this table, you can see that the length of admission's actually fairly similar. Importantly, the total TPA dose was similar, and the total contrast volume

between these two groups was also similar. If you look at other post-procedure outcomes, luckily, none of these patients that had renal dysfunction had long-term harm. There was similar six month mortality, six percent versus five percent.

Other complications were very similar. Limb salvage was 92 and 95 percent and there was no increased readmission rate for DVT or arterial thrombosis. So, ladies and gentlemen, in conclusion, the use of PMT as a treatment for venous

or arterial thrombosis is associated with acute renal dysfunction, but is not associated with adverse six month clinical outcomes. We still use this to hasten thrombolysis time and decrease time in the hospital,

but I think it necessitates that we have post-operative, post-procedure vigilance, and renal protective measures as much as possible to decrease the likelihood of renal dysfunction. Thank you very much.

- [Instructor] Thank you very much. So, you saw some of the issues that our, oh, this is the slightest cut, but that's okay. Some of the issues that we've seen with these percutaneous mechanical devices, and, back in the 90's, and perhaps even more than a decade ago, there were a lot of these.

And this space gets hot and cold, and one of the problems is that the level of evidence for doing these is very low, and when it is done, it wasn't done well. And this is a nice registry, a lot of patients enrolled, unfortunately we didn't learn

what we had to learn from these types of registries, because of just the study wasn't done well. So the level of evidence is low, and when we did have them, they didn't really work. And you saw some of the problems, that these devices can cause.

And here's another problem that wasn't discussed. You can see the DVT, iliofemoral DVT in here, and a device is pushed a few times up and down, and sort of aspiration, a Bertoulli, that type of thing. And this looks, oh wow, well this looks good,

maybe the thing is working, except all the clot is up here. So, these devices tend to push the clot around. So the issue is, enter now more recently, these are some of the more recent ones. Note that the AngioVac is not here, I don't consider that a practical thrombectomy device,

and so, it's not here. So, we're going to be talking about JETi. This is a system that is an aspiration system with a jet that comes inside the catheter, therefore the clot is engaged and pulled in and broken down by the jet, therefore there's no hemolysis.

And this demonstrated in this case, which is acute and chronic 17 year old multiple DVTs in the past, the iliofemoral segments are stented, as you can see here, this segment is somewhat fresh clot but these, as you can see, are subacute clot. Look at this, so the system now is designed

for over the wire, but for DVT you can use it without the wire, because it works a lot better. As you can see it can really aspirate the clot, in before your eyes. Now this I have passed the device in here once, and you can see the fresh clot is gone,

we have some residual debris in there, we have not established flow yet, and then I turn the device on... and it pulls the whole thing in, okay? So, very powerful aspiration method. So, and as you can see here, we don't have

a flow establish, outflow established yet. Therefore, when you turn it on, you have a vacuum created right here, and so this tells you how strongly this device can aspirate and work. And this isn't on the table.

After a pass here, two passes here, some residual clot in here, obviously there's residual clot there. So we pass it around these areas once more, and this segment obviously needs to get stented and on the table, re-establish antegrade flow. Since May, we've had 19 patients treated, most of them DVT.

And, based on our assessment, 17 of the 19 patients at a total time of 90 minutes on the table, had better than 90% clot retrieve. We have 30-day patency data on only 16 of those patients, because this is really since this May. And 15 of those were open, one re-thrombosed

and we had to retrieve again. Conclusion, so preliminary experience indicates that this is an effective device. There were no safety issues, we don't see any hemolysis, we don't see any pushing around of the clot, but there is a learning curve to it,

and for best application, thank you.

- [Narrator] Thank you, thank you Dr. Veith and the committee for the kind invitation. No related disclosures. Carotid webs are rare, noninflammatory arteriopathy that are also known as pseudovalvular folds, as well as other pseudonyms for this. They are small, shelf-like linear filling defects,

arising posteriorly from the posterior proximal-most ICA and project superiorly into the lumen. They're generally regarded as a developmental anomaly of the brachiocephalic system, and histopathology lacks atheromatous changes and inflammation of the tunica intima.

They may be associated with FMD, or be considered an atypical form of intimal fibroplasia, and generally arise from dysplasia within the media. They will as we will see, carry a considerable stroke risk based on laminar flow disruption and irregular shear profile.

This is the mechanism by which they produce strokes, seen clockwise from the top upper-left. There are areas of stasis in which thrombus can develop behind the web. The thrombus can enlarge and eventually embolize. Operative findings and pathologic findings include

these webs seen here behind this nerve hook, and generally smooth muscle with extensive myxoid degenerative changes. Over the last several years we have treated 10 patients with carotid endarterectomy for symptomatic webs. The mean age of these patients

is generally quite young, in the 40s. The majority are female, one patient had a bilateral web and 70% of these patients had no atherosclerotic risk factors whatsoever. The mean maximum peak systolic velocity on duplex was 77 centimeters,

and five of the cases were closed primarily without a patch. There were no strokes perioperatively in this group, no mortalities, and there have been no new neurological events nor restenosis. Several other groups have looked at this phenomenon as well,

this is a case series of which 7 patients were identified prospectively having had an ischemic stroke. Again, the mean age was young. Of note, five of these patients had a recurrent ipsilateral stroke to the web. No FMD was seen throughout the other vascular beds

and four out of five of these patients, the recurrent patients had CEAs with no recurrence at approximately a year. Another review identified 33 patients who had excellent CAT scan imaging. These were younger patients over a six year period,

with cryptogenic stroke. The prevalence of webs within that group was 21%. Symptomatic patients within that group with webs were 7 patients out of 33 and again you see a young age, predominance of women,

in this study of predominance of African American patients 3 bilateral webs, all patients had MCA infarcts. And oh, 1.6% of the webs in the control group were without a stroke. Another case-control study looked at 62 cases over four years.

They were able to match 53 of these patients with other cerebrovascular pathology, webs were found in 9% of the cases, but only 1% of the controls. And again of the webs, predominance of young patients

and women with two bilateral strokes. So what about diagnosis? Even large webs generally do not meet the velocity criteria for significant stenosis, and while you may see a filling defect, you're generally dependent on B mode imaging,

and having a high level of suspicion, for identifying this process. CTA is the gold standard, it's got rapid, high-resolution imaging, reformatting across planes, makes this an excellent modality

in associated findings of thrombus, and atherosclerosis can also be detected. Angiogram again, as always, gives you a good view of flow dynamics, intra and extra cranial pathology, and in general the finding is of contrast pooling,

which you have to look for behind the web. MRA is one method that's been used to characterize this, in this modality you can see slowed blood flow distal to the web, blood pooling distal to the web, and generally this all leads to an atypical pulsatility, of the carotid wall near the area of the web,

suggesting impaired hemodynamics in this condition. Management is with a carotid endarderectomy which has been the preferred treatment, although some have advocated medical management with formal anticoagulation, patients have had strokes

while on anti platelet therapy, and there are several case series now appearing of acute stroke treated with stents, these are generally delayed following thrombectomy. There's one latrogenic dissection in these groups. These patients have few atherosclerotic risk factors,

in the same demographics as noted above. So in conclusion, these are associated with FMD and intimal fibroplasia. The prevalence is low. The prevalence may be increasing but it's not clear whether this is a true prevalence increase,

or simply increased detection. They're associated with recurrent symptoms even in the setting of adequate medical therapy and is an underappreciated cause of stroke, and are now becoming a recognized, and rather than a cryptogenic cause of stroke.

They are generally not identified by current duplex criteria in asymptomatic patients, and duplex may miss them entirely. Axial imaging is essential and currently we don't stratify these based on either legion characteristics or demographics.

So while the optimal management is not completely defined given the recurrent stroke risk CEA seems prudent especially in young, medically fit patients with or without patch angioplasty, which may have some impact on quality metrics

at least in the United States. We've treated patients with three months of antiplatelet therapy, aspirin indefinitely. Right now the role of statins is undefined, and the durability and role for endovascular approaches remains also undefined.

Thank you.

- [Jes] Here are my potential disclosures, I have none. Research in non-aneurysm screening programs points to the risk of more or less severe negative, psychological side effects. It is feelings of stigmatization, fear, aggression, psychosomatic reactions, social isolation, nocebo effects, that's the completely opposite than placebo.

It causes illness and blame the victim reactions in lifestyle mediated diseases. And I ... Expose the psychological side effects, also in my first screening trial, and concluded that the offer of screening

causes transient psychological stress in subjects, found to have no aneurysm. But more seriously, diagnosis of an aneurysm seems to impair quality of life progressively, in conservatively treated cases. And this impairment

seems completely reversible by operation. And that is just what the UK SAT Trial also reported. But it couldn't confirmed in the MASS trial by Theresa Marteau. She is one of the leading experts in psychometrics.

And she is exceptionally critical on screening. She couldn't show any significant reaction or states compared to the non-invited controls, except a short and transient reaction on those having surgery. In all the differences if any were small, she concluded.

Neither could I in my second randomized trial, but this time I was aware of the side effects, and carefully instructed on how to inform the screened positive men. The MASS trial was also the second trial of Mr. Alan Scott. He was experienced from the Chichester trial,

and may have done the same experiences. And qualitative studies in recently initiated programs also conclude the need for proper information. So I'll tell you one message today, is let the patients know, "The danger of an aneurysm is not knowing you have one."

As underset, we can calculate that it takes approximately two elective repairs to prevent one rupture. It may sound quite acceptable, but you can also formulate it this way, that approximately half of those referred for elective repair,

they risk complications and death for conditions that they never would have trouble with if it was left unrepaired. This is a serious and an ethical dilemma which can't be solved currently. Not for screen detected cases,

not for randomly detected cases. We simply need better tools. Nevertheless, screening and preventive repairs still saves more lives and it doesn't cause more postoperative death, and complications because it prevents emergency procedures.

And the fact that treating screen detected cases are much less dangerous than treating incidentally detected cases. Screen detected cases actually are treated with one third the risk of those detected incidentally. So when the randomized clinical trials,

are weighted in a population based view, using gained, quality adjusted living years and its costs, early detection shows to be efficient and cost effective, but it doesn't take into account other psychological costs. Diagnoses without benefit and harm against people who would never have problems if they were left alone.

But who is to decide what's best for the individual? I know a lot of ... people who want to play God and take the decision on other people, but I strongly believe that men age 65 are old enough to make a decision on their own.

Thank you very much.

now that you all have an overview and a refresher of nursing school and how these medications work in our body I want to now go over our practice

guidelines and the considerations that we take into place so as you know I'm not going to go over into detail the patient populations that are prescribed these meds but kind of knowing that these are the

patients that we see in our practice that for example are on your direct direct vector 10a inhibitors patients with afib or artificial valves or patients with a clock er sorry a factor v clotting disorder these oral direct

thrombin inhibitors patients with coronary artery thrombosis or patients who are at risk for hit in even patients with percutaneous coronary intervention or even for prophylaxis purposes your p2 y12 inhibitors or your platelet

inhibitors are your cabbage patients or your patients with coronary artery disease or if your patients have had a TI AR and mi continued your Cox inhibitors rheumatoid arthritis patients osteoarthritis vitamin K antagonists a

fib heart failure patients who have had heart failure mechanical valves placed pulmonary embolism or DVT patients and then your angiogenesis inhibitors kind of like Kerry said these are newer to our practice these are things that we

had just recently really kind of get caught up with these cancer agents because there really aren't any monitoring factors for these and there is not a lot of established literature out there knowing that granted caring I

did our literature review almost two years ago now so 18 months ago there is a lot more literature and obviously we learned things this morning so our guidelines are reviewed on a by yearly basis so we will be reviewing these too

so there is more literature out there for these thank goodness so now we want to kind of go into two hold or not to hold these medications so knowing that we have these guidelines and we'll be sharing you with you the tables that

tell us hold for five days for example hold for seven days some of these medications depending on why the patient is taking them are not safe to hold so some of the articles that we reviewed showed that for sure there's absolutely

an identified risk with holding aspirin for example a case study found that a patient was taking aspirin for coronary artery disease and had an MI that was associated with holding aspirin for a

radiology procedure they found that this happened in 2% of patients so 11 of 475 patients that sounds small number but in our practice we do about 400 procedures in a week so that would be 11 patients in one week that would have had possibly

an adverse reaction to holding their aspirin and then your Cox inhibitors or your NSAIDs as Carrie already mentioned it's just really important to know that some of those the Cox inhibitors have no platelet effects and then your NSAIDs

can be helped because their platelet function is normalized within 24 to 48 hours Worf Roman coumadin so depending on the procedure type and we'll go into that to here where we have low risk versus moderate to high risk

we do recommend occasionally holding warfarin however we need to verify why the patient is absolutely on their warfarin and if bridging is an option because as you learn bridging is not always on the most appropriate thing for

your patient so when patients on warfarin and they do not have any lab values available that's when you really need to step outside of guidelines and talk with your radiologists your procedure list and potentially have a

physician to physician discussion to determine what's best for a particular patient this just kind of goes into your adp inhibitors and plavix a few of the studies that we showed 50 are sorry 63 patients who took Plex within five days

of their putt biopsy they found that there was of those one bleeding complication during a lung biopsy so minimal so that's kind of why we have created our guidelines the way we did and here's just more information

regarding your direct thrombin inhibitors as cari alluded to products is something that we see very commonly in our practice and then your direct vector 10a inhibitors this is what we found in the literature

good morning everybody and I'm always excited when there's pediatric content anywhere so when Nancy Michelle and I were we're talking we were trying to figure out a topic and I had some experience with some foreign bodies in MRI and such in my experience so we

thought it would be interesting to talk about interesting cases in pediatric radiology okay our objectives for today are to identify potential risk factors that present in Pediatric Radiology patients discuss some pre screening

assessments for common pediatric comorbid conditions using a case base case based methodology and reviews and radiologic images of unique pediatric cases so we know that kids have a tendency to put things into small

objects into their mouths and other or orifices their nose their ears their vaginas so we are going to be discussing some cases throughout this presentation and we know that kids not only ingest objects but they also insert them and

they may actually inhale them as well most of these objects will pass spontaneously 10 to 20 percent of those that they swallow will require removal by endoscopy and about 1% require surgical removal and why is this a

problem with kids we know that kids are in the oral phase of development so they their teeth are not formed so they have inadequate dentition so they can't chew things so those pieces of hotdog those peanuts and and such are difficult for

them to chew which we know is the first phase of digestion their epiglottis is higher so it can make it more difficult for them to swallow and they have immature swallowing coordination so hence things are more likely to get

stuck so the incidence of foreign bodies is about six months to four years of age makes sense there's a slight predominance of males I can tell you I have a son and a daughter my daughter never put anything in her mouth or nose

or whatever but my son was certainly broke that record there's a slight predominance of males the most common objects are coins earrings marbles barrettes and rocks and objects that are typically longer than five centimeters

or greater than two centimeters in diameter are less likely to pass through the pylorus which makes sense and most pass within four to six days but some take up to four weeks of ingestion so why do we need radiologic imaging so

x-rays we know that the object would have to be radio opaque to be visualized on x-ray we know there's a challenge in cooperating for expiratory films and I'll talk about that in a couple of more slides we want to avoid CT scan if

possible because of the radio the exposure but ultrasound is really up and coming in terms of determining the location and the status of the object and provides dynamic imaging when you're thinking about foreign body foreign body

ingestion so ingestion versus aspiration foreign body aspiration is the fifth leading cause of death among one to three year olds and the primary cause of unintentional death in infants so the initial choking episode may be

unwitnessed it doesn't take very long for it for a six-month-old who's sitting up to grab something and put it in his mouth and toys pieces of toys account for ninety percent of these cases there's often a delay in diagnosing

these cases in patients that have a history of asthma croup or pneumonia because they always COFF so when they have an episode of coughing say oh it just must be the start of an asthma flare not thinking about foreign body

aspiration in the mix and of course early and up too late complications maybe it's fixing cardiac arrest dis Nia and laryngeal edema because as I said the epiglottis is high those Airways are narrow so there can be swelling

they swallow or ingest something and not

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